Friday 24 May 2024

TheGenealogist adds Army Lists from 1837 to 1959

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

1.8 Million New Military Records Go Online
Unlock the Military Histories of Your Ancestors with TheGenealogist’s Latest Release of Army Lists

The Genealogist has added 1.8 million individuals to its Military Collection with its latest release of Army Lists from 1837 to 1959.

Family history research often requires scouring military records to uncover the career details of ancestors who had served in the British Army. A key resource for such research are the officially published Army Lists that provide comprehensive details about officers and warrant officers, including their ranks, regiments, and service appointments.

Subscribers to TheGenealogist can now access an extensive collection of digitised Army Lists, which can significantly enhance their understanding of an ancestor's military career. These records detail officers by regiment, rank and seniority, offering a detailed snapshot of the officer corps at any given time.

This resource is excellent for tracking the careers of officers, offering a chronological record of promotions, transfers, and retirements. It provides a wealth of information crucial for family historians, including dates of promotions, brevet ranks, and the duration of an officer's service. Additionally, these records include information about officers who retired or resigned, often with specific dates of departure from active service.

The Army Lists can provide insights into where officers served in staff positions or held special appointments, for example as instructors or aides-de-camp. This additional context can be invaluable in understanding an officer’s career and their contributions to the military beyond their regimental duties.

Moreover, the lists encompass officers serving in colonial forces and the Indian Army, reflecting the global reach of the British Empire. Some officers may have transferred between these forces, further enriching the historical context for researchers.

TheGenealogist’s digitised Army Lists are an indispensable tool for anyone looking to explore their family's military history. With this resource, family historians can uncover the detailed dates of their ancestors’ service and gain a deeper understanding of their military careers and contributions.

Read TheGenealogist’s feature article, The Stiff Upper Lip: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2024/the-stiff-upper-lip-7471/


(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.

British Newspaper Archive storms past 78 million pages

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) has just stormed past 78 million pages, with the total at the time of writing being 78,379,006 pages - a massive additon over the last week, with a great deal of Scottish and Irish content.

The following are the latest additions for Scotland and Northern Ireland over the last 30 days, with one of the most interesting additions perhaps being the earliest editions of the Belfast Newsletter from the late 18th century:

Scotland

Ellon Times & East Gordon Advertiser
1991-1994

St. Andrews Citizen
1872, 1993-1994

Arbroath Herald
1981-1982, 1992

Falkirk Herald
1986-1987, 1990

Motherwell Times
1984-1985, 1989, 1992-1994

Musselburgh News
1986-1987

Leven Mail
1965-1974

Cumbernauld News
1994

Kirriemuir Herald
1987

Fife Herald
1988, 1993-1994

Dalkeith Advertiser
1964-1968, 1976, 1979-1982

Fife Free Press
1988-1992

Mearns Leader
1975, 1993-1994

Buchan Observer and East Aberdeenshire Advertiser
1985, 1987-1989, 1993-1994

Kilsyth Chronicle
1898-1899

Buteman
1856

Shetland Times
1945, 1962

Broughty Ferry Guide and Advertiser
1981, 1983-1984

Forfar Dispatch
1953-1958, 1986


Northern Ireland

Larne Times
1992, 2000-2002

Coleraine Times
2000-2001

Londonderry Sentinel
1978-1983, 1988, 1991, 2000-2001

Belfast News-Letter
1768-1769, 1771, 1773-1774, 1781, 1783, 1786, 1804, 1810-1815, 2000, 2002

Ulster Star
2000-2002

Newtownabbey Times and East Antrim Times
2000-2002

Carrick Times and East Antrim Times
2000-2002

Derry Journal
2000-2002

Ballymena Observer
1985, 1991, 1993, 1995

Ballymena Weekly Telegraph
1990
 

Chris

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.

Wednesday 22 May 2024

Ancestry adds Londonderry city burials information 1853-1961

Just added to Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

Londonderry, Northern Ireland, City Cemetery Burials, 1853-1961
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/62771/
Source: Cemeteries. Tower Museum. https://towermuseumcollections.com/cemetery-records/ Accessed: Jun 2023.

This collection contains burial records from Londonderry, Northern Ireland between the years 1853 and 1961. Most records are in English.

Using this collection

Records in the collection may include the following information:

  • Name
  • Spouse's name
  • Religion
  • Death date
  • Death place
  • Burial date
  • Burial place
  • Burial location
  • Age
  • Parents' names
  • Birth date
  • Birthplace

Chris

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.

Tuesday 21 May 2024

2022 census - number of Gaelic speakers has increased since 2011

I'm spending today revising for my Advanced Higher exam next week in Gaelic, and what should suddenly be announced but the 2022 census results on the language's state in Scotland, for which there is some mixed news on its fortunes.

The absolutely brilliant news is that overall in Scotland the number of people aged over 3 who can speak Gaelic has risen from 57,602 in 2011 to 69,701, with some 2.5% of the population having some knowledge of the language, up from 1.7% (an increase of 50%). This is thanks to a growing and successful Gaelic Medium Education programme, as well as an increase in interest further afield (thanks to SpeakGaelic, Duolingo, etc). That means 1 in every 40 people in the country now has some level of understanding of Gaelic. However, on the negative side, its use in the Western Isles, the language's remaining native heartland, has fallen from 52% to 45% since 2011, although in Na h-Eileanan Siar the number of folk with skills in Gaelic stands at 57.2%. 

More work needs to be done to bolster the language's continued use in its remaining native heartland, at the same time recognising that a new form of language community is beginning to emerge beyond the Western Isles. Duolingo won't be around forever, so more sustainable policies need to be put in place, something it is hoped that the new languages bill before the Scottish Parliament will urgently address (as well as measures for the Scots language). Maybe it's also time to bring back Comunn an Luchd-Ionnsachaidh?

On the Scots language, the numbers claiming some knowledge of the language has risen to 46.2% in 2022 from 37.7% in 2011.

Incidentally, also released are figures on those who claim to be religious in Scotland - 51.1% have no religion in the country at all, the highest figure in the UK, up from 36.7% in 2011.

The census data is available at www.scotlandscensus.gov.uk.

Comment: Over the last 5 years I have been putting in a shift to learn the language of my Highland ancestors (Perthshire, Invernessshire and Rossshire), and so am delighted to see that the number of Gaelic speakers is finally growing again in the country, even if it is still struggling to find a steady baseline in the Western Isles. There are new Gaelic centre initiatives on the mainland at places such as the new Culturlann in Inverness, and continued enterprises such as An Lòchran in Glasgow, which I recently raised £2225 for by doing the Glasgow Kiltwalk. Next week I will be sitting my Advanced Higher exam, in the summer I am looking forward to a week's course at Sabhal Mòr Ostaig on the Isle of Skye, and then from September I will be returning to full-time education for eight months, doing a Cert HE course in Gaelic with Immersion at Glasgow University. I am still not sure where all this is taking me - I will certainly be applying it more to my genealogical work, but may well seek to take on new areas of interest after I finish the course. It's an exciting journey, and one that is certainly reshaping and rebalancing my connections to Scotland, but the key thing I want to point out is that if you are interested in Gaelic, it can be learned!

If you have an interest in the language, try the Duolingo Scottish Gaelic course to get underway (www.duolingo.com), as well as the BBC's Speak Gaelic series (www.speakgaelic.scot) and the Learn Gaelic platform (www.learngaelic.scot). If you are making progress with then language, and are resident in Scotland, I would also strongly recommend the National 5, Higher, and Advanced Higher courses in Gaelic for Learners available via e-Sgoil (https://www.e-sgoil.com). If you're in the Glasgow area, do visit An Lòchran (www.anlochran.com) for its opportunities for learners to get comfortable using the language.

And don't forget this site's Genealogy Terms for Gaelic Learners page at http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/p/gaelic-genealogy.html...!

Deagh fòrtan dhuibh uile - agus suas leis a' Ghàidhlig!

For BBC Alba's coverage of the census results, visit https://www.bbc.co.uk/naidheachdan/sgeulachdan/c0kk8xrl8k2o.


Chris

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land RecordsSharing Your Family History OnlineTracing Your Scottish Family History on the InternetTracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES

Sunday 19 May 2024

Ancestry adds Scottish Indexes' Scottish Crown Counsel Procedure Books index

Ancestry has added the following index to Scottish court records as created by Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes.com):

Web: Scotland, Crown Counsel Procedure Books Index, 1822-1877
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/70963/
Source: Scotland, Crown Counsel Procedure Books Index, 1822-1877. Glasgow, Scotland, UK: Scottish Indexes. https://www.scottishindexes.com/ Accessed: 2024.

There is no description of the records on Ancestry's platform (I suspect Scots Law is too much for it!), but there is a guide to them on Scottish Indexes itself, available at https://www.scottishindexes.com/learningccpb.aspx, which notes the following:

The Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (now known as the COPFS) is Scotland’s public prosecution service and sudden or suspicious death investigation authority. Although modern records are closed, we can access historical records and these can be a great resource if you are tracing your Scottish family history. Records for preservation are held by the National Records of Scotland.

We have indexed historical cases reported to the Crown Counsel for an opinion, this is the AD9 collection held by the National Records of Scotland. These are cases where someone was accused of a crime and the Crown Office was asked for an official ‘opinion’.

As is the case today, some went on to the High Court, some to the Sheriff Court or another lower court, and some were dropped. This means that the Crown Counsel Procedure Books acts as a finding aid to other records


NB: Alternative indexing for the records is also available on Old Scottish from 1822-1856 at https://www.oldscottish.com/crown-counsel-procedure-cases.html

Chris

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.

Photo Scanner now available on MyHeritage app

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com)

There’s nothing like indulging that sweet sense of nostalgia when you look at old photos. We’re delighted to announce that we’ve made it even easier to scan family photos using the MyHeritage mobile app. We recently added a powerful, state-of-the art Photo Scanner that uses Artificial Intelligence (AI) to capture entire album pages in one tap. The new Photo Scanner uses the same technology that we use in Reimagine, our standalone app for preserving and improving your family photos that we released last year. Users were excited to efficiently scan their cherished photos and have them sync with their MyHeritage family site. We’re excited to bring the same powerful technology to the MyHeritage mobile app, so you can preserve your family photos and improve them with our suite of photo features! 

For further details visit https://blog.myheritage.com/2024/05/new-multi-photo-scanner-on-the-myheritage-mobile-app

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris 

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.

TheGenealogist maps 1851 census entries for Britain

 From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

Where were they in 1851? – Mapping Your Ancestors’ in the Census
For the first time, you can now pin down your ancestors in 1851!
 
TheGenealogist’s latest release makes it easy to locate an ancestor geographically in the 1851 census. With a choice of historical and modern georeferenced maps, this welcome development makes it simple to explore the place where your ancestors lived and discover their surroundings.

Census records have always been a staple resource for family historians. With the particulars of the street or road name, researchers will often turn to a modern map to see if they can locate where their forebears lived. This, however, can be fraught with difficulties if the road name changed over the years or the area was redeveloped. Thus, TheGenealogist has been working through its census collection, linking the records to the detailed map collections on its Map Explorer™.

●    The 1851 census now joins the ranks of other key censuses (1861, 1871, 1881, 1891, 1901, 1911, and the 1939 Register) already integrated with the innovative Map Explorer™.

●    With just a click of a button, researchers can pin their forebears’ residences down to a parish, street or building and trace the routes they would have taken to visit local shops, pubs, churches, workplaces, and parks.

●    Historical maps reveal the location of major roads and the nearest railway stations, shedding light on how our ancestors would have travelled to other parts of the country to work, visit relatives or their hometowns.

With this latest release, subscribers of TheGenealogist can now explore their ancestors’ neighbourhood in 1851, making it easier to uncover hidden stories and discover connections to family that lived nearby.

For those family historians on the move, TheGenealogist allows you to trace your forebears’ footprints while walking down modern streets using their “Locate me” feature. Imagine retracing your ancestors’ steps and discovering the places that they had frequented!

When viewing a household record from the 1851 census on TheGenealogist, you’ll now see a map indicating where your ancestor was during the night of the census. Clicking on this map seamlessly loads the location in Map Explorer™, enabling you to explore the area.

Read TheGenealogist’s feature article where the 1851 census locates the Edinburgh house where a famous author was born: https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2024/a-leading-light-on-the-map-of-the-1851-census-7470/

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.

Friday 17 May 2024

FindmyPast adds Scottish and Northern Irish deaths 1980-2024

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) has added two new additions this week for Northern Ireland and Scotland:

  • 497,172 death record transcriptions from 1980-2024 added to the Scotland, Modern and Civil Deaths & Burials 1855-2024 collection.
  • 28,292 additions to a new Ireland, Northern Ireland Deaths 1980-2024 database. 

Comment: I'll be honest, at first I felt a bit queasy seeing the index entry for my father who died in Scotland just 3 years ago. The information lists his name, town and county of death, and his birth and death dates. The source is given as "MiExact Ltd", the website for which at https://miexact.com denotes them as handling "Mortality and wills intelligence, events, data insights & data management solutions for the UK charity & commercial sectors."

This seems to be a similar sort of harvested data presentation as offered by Ancestry through its Scotland and Northern Ireland, Death Index, 1989-2022 collection, the source of which is GreyPower Deceased Data. compiled by Wilmington Millennium, West Yorkshire. This site too offes my father's death entry, with practically the same information returned. 

However, on reflection it is not the fact that my father's death is noted there that bothers me - after all, it did happen three years ago, and there's an index entry for him on ScotlandsPeople, which hosts the state's official death records, and through which I can purchase copies of his death record. For genealogical purposes it will of course be helpful too. But I think what bugs me slightly about this is that a commercial company has an index of records including those up to 2024, and from a few test searches, the records appear to go up to January 2024 - in other words, there will be people included in this new database who have literally just passed away four months ago. At least on Ancestry there is a buffer zone of a couple of years for thiose who may be grieveing. 

Perhaps a slight tweak to this might make it a bit more tasteful, FindmyPast?

Chris

 Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.

Tuesday 14 May 2024

Family Tree magazine's Irish Ancestors Study Afternoon with Chris Paton

On Saturday June 29th 2024 I will be giving three talks for a Family Tree magazine hosted Irish Ancestors Study Afternoon. The following will be the programme, which kicks off at 1pm (UK time) - each talk will be about an hour, with Q&A and short breaks in between:

1) Records of Daily Life in Ireland

There are many basic resources available to help us establish the genealogy of our families, but in this session, family historian Chris Paton looks at many additional record sets exist that document their role and status in society, as well as their fate. These include electoral records (including freeholders lists and absent voters lists), the administration of the poor law and the role of the poorhouse in Ireland, and education records.

Chris will also look at judicial records and the records of law enforcement, and explore a case study of a 19th century murder which unblocked a genealogical brick wall within his own ancestry, pushing the family narrative back to the mid 18th century.

2) Researching Irish Occupations

In this session genealogist Chris Paton explores the occupational world of our Irish ancestors, including agricultural Ireland, the factories and shipyards established through industrialisation, the professional classes such as church ministries, physicians and nurses, communications workers, the merchant shipping services, and the military, both British and Irish.

Chris will also look at how Irish people travelled to Britain and beyond for economic opportunities, whether through seasonal work or through longer term economic necessity.

3) A Decade of Remembrance: Researching Ireland 1912-1923

In this talk Chris looks at the landmark events that led to the Partition of Ireland in 1921 and its consequences. It includes the Suffragette struggle in Ireland, the Ulster Covenant of 1912, the formation of the Irish Volunteers and the Ulster Volunteers, the Dublin Lock-out of 1913, the First World War, the Easter Rising, the War of Independence, Partition, and the subsequent Irish Civil War.

As well as addressing the historical events Chris will show how to research ancestors caught up in the period, whether on the British or Irish side, and from across the island and beyond.

To sign up, please visit https://www.family-tree.co.uk/how-to-guides/webinars/irish-ancestors-study-afternoon-29-june/ - ticket for all three talks are £35, or £25 for Family Tree subscribers or Family Tree Plus members.

I hope you can join me!

Chris

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.

Friday 10 May 2024

New Pharos course - Researching Irish Land Records

I'm delighted to announce that a second Irish themed course that I have written will be taught via Pharos Tutors (www.pharostutors.com) from October 21st - here are the details!

Researching Irish Land Records

The issue of land ownership was a potent question in Ireland for centuries. In the 17th century vast swathes of land was settled by Protestant British colonists during the Plantations of Ulster, drawn mostly from Scotland, whilst the subsequent Cromwellian conquest led to mass confiscation of land across Ireland, to be conveyed to English soldiers and 'adventurers'. The Penal Laws had soon dispossessed the native Irish Catholic population of many rights, including land ownership and inheritance rights. At the same time, the first national land valuation survey in the world was carried out, and an elaborate system of land administration imposed. In the 19th century, Ireland's incorporation into the United Kingdom was followed by great tragedy with the Famine, but in its aftermath a new opportunity arose following the Land War to radically alter rental provisions and then to redistribute land away from an absentee landlord class.

Following on from the Progressing Your Irish Research Online course*, this course will look at the various types of records that can help with land research in Ireland from the period of the 17th century to the present day. It will examine the various forms of land tenure that existed, the records of ownership and rental, the valuation and conveyance of property, maps, and many other resources. Importantly it will show how to find the most useful land records, and how to use them for your family history research.

* Although not compulsory, it is recommended that students will have first completed the Progressing Your Irish Research Online course.

Lesson Headings:

  • The Basics of Irish Land Research
  • Colonialism and Conquest
  • Managing the Land
  • Valuation and Conveyance
  • The Land War and Redistribution

Relevant countries: Ireland

What to expect:

Each lesson includes lesson notes, activities and forum exercises for students to complete during the week and a one-hour live tutorial (text chat or Zoom) with the tutor and the rest of the class. Times for the tutorials are set at the beginning of each course by the tutor. 

Tutor: Chris Paton   
Length: 5 weeks   
Start date: Mon 21 Oct 2024
Cost: £58

To register, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/researching-irish-land-records

Comment: This will be the fifth course that I teach through Pharos, and the third that I have written, and I am looking forward to getting stuck in! Athouygh not compulsory, it is recommended that students will have first done my Progressing Your Irish Research Online course prior to this new course - it starts up again on August 19th, and you can find more on this at https://www.pharostutors.com/progressing-your-irish-research-online.

Chris

Order Tracing Your Belfast Ancestors in the UK at https://bit.ly/BelfastAncestors. Also available - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. For purchase in tthe USA visit https://www.penandswordbooks.com. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, on Threads at @scottishgenesblog and via Mastodon at https://mastodon.scot/@ScottishGENES.