Tuesday, 31 March 2020

Secretary Hand - the Joscelyn font!

Every so often, something comes along that just makes me laugh for its sheer brilliance and simplicity. This is one such occasion - a font that writes in a style of Secretary Hand!

To be slightly more correct, there is a font available for your word processing software called Joscelyn. I noticed it being tweeted about earlier on the Manuscripts After Print account (@MSS_AfterPrint), which was retweeted by a reader (sorry, have lost who that was, but you are a hero!). The font attempts to render text in an old European style of handwriting known as Secretary Hand, which in Scotland was well used up to the 18th century, and which can cause a great number of headaches with earlier documents.

This is an example of the font's style...


The phrase written here is "This is some craic, so it is....!!!" (Ulster English and Secretary Hand, together at last!)

The Scottish Handwriting website (www.scottishhandwriting.com) suggests that a useful practice phrase to write down in Scots, using Secretary Hand, is 'sic braw secretarie hand'. This is that phrase from the site, with Joscelyn's rendition of it placed below:

You'll notice some differences - it's... complicated! But you'll find more about it on the website.

Whether the font can help you attune to the forms of Secretary Hand script or not, it is still immense fun to have something a bit Oldie Wordie on my computer!

The tweet noted more about the font earlier:

We've been having loads of fun with Joscelyn, an amazing secretary hand font developed by the incredibly talented Peter Baker. It's based on the main hand of Corpus Christi College MS 488 and is freely available at github.com/psb1558/Joscel. Check out those ligatures!

Following the link takes you to a page where you can download a zipped folder called Joscelyn.zip. Save this, then extract the files. Once done, simply right click on Joscelyn.otf and click on install.
 
With thanks to all involved!

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

TNA: Volunteers needed to transcribe Royal Navy service records

From the UK's National Archives at Kew (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk):

Volunteers needed to transcribe Royal Navy service records

The National Archives is currently seeking volunteers to help transcribe First World War Royal Navy service records for a free online database.

Service records for the First World War can provide information about individuals and their lives. However, as crew lists for ships and submarines during this period rarely survive, it is difficult for researchers to determine who was on a ship or in a certain battle together. Royal Navy: First World War - Lives at Sea is a fully-searchable online resource, hosted by the National Maritime Museum, which provides researchers with crew lists that have been reconstructed from transcribed service records. The project aims to facilitate and promote new research into topics such as mortality rates, invalidity, the areas men were recruited from and the type of tradesmen enlisted.

Volunteers on the project are tasked with inputting information from service records into a database. All you need to be involved is a computer, internet connection and a willingness to learn. No prior historical knowledge or training is necessary. There is also no minimum time commitment for volunteers. Whether you can do a little or a lot, all contributions are welcome.

For more information and to register your interest, please contact crewlists@nationalarchives.gov.uk.

Royal Navy: First World War - Lives at Sea is a collaborative project between The National Archives and the National Maritime Museum, with the generous support of the Crew List Index Project team.


(With thanks to Clare Kelly)

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Ulster Historical Foundation - Migration Memorial, Genealogy Hub, and Books Bundle

From the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestyireland.com):

Invest in our future - Migration Memorial and Genealogy Hub

Ulster Historical Foundation would like to develop an Irish Migration Memorial where interested parties can commemorate a specific ancestor, or family line that they have been researching. By supporting our proposed Migration Memorial you would also be contributing to the development of our "Genealogy Hub" - a dedicated research centre, library and lecture facility based in Northern Ireland.

The Migration Memorial itself would be in the form of a tree on which members of the public can sponsor a leaf in memory of their ancestors. A tree and leaves we believe are particularly appropriate motifs in relation to immigration and family history.

For more information visit: www.ancestryireland.com/invest-in-our-future/



Irish ancestors research book bundle

At this time of great uncertainty and as many of us find ourselves having to isolate from the outside world, might we suggest that now might be the time to do the family history research that we always intended to do?

To this end, we have added a collection of core genealogy publications - our Irish Ancestors Research Bundle - to our online bookstore. All three books included in this bundle fully complement each other and are highly valuable resources to help guide your research.

We would recommend these titles to anyone with even a fleeting interest in researching their Irish family history.

For more information go to: www.booksireland.org.uk/store/books/irish-ancestors-research-bundle


(With thanks to the Ulster Historical Foundation - and I'm honoured to have my book included in their bundle!)

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Family Tree magazine announces new initiatives for readers

From Family Tree magazine (www.family-tree.co.uk)

The team behind Family Tree magazine and the family-tree.co.uk website have launched a number of new initiatives to support family historians and the genealogy community during the Covid-19 lockdown, including a new podcast, a weekly email, and a growing library of family history videos.

Associate Publisher Matt Hill said: ‘We’re determined to do everything we can to help family historians around the world carry on with their genealogy research during these tough times. Of course, safety is the number one priority for us all, but if circumstances and time allow, working on our family tree could be a welcome distraction, these initiatives are aimed at keeping our audience occupied and motivated.’

The new initiatives include:

'Daily inspiration’ activities, hints and tips
We've introduced a new section to the website and are also adding daily updates, tips, guides and more onto our social media platforms. Just tune in to facebook, twitter or instagram every day at 12 noon, or visit the website: www.family-tree.co.uk/how-to-guides/daily-inspiration

Brand new Family Tree podcast
We’re so excited to have launched our own podcast! It’s completely free and features interviews with top genealogy experts, updates from the team, and plenty more. The podcast is available on all popular podcast platforms, including apple. Listen here: https://familytr.ee/podcast

A series of informative video guides (free to magazine subscribers)
The Family Tree Videos Library is growing all the time, featuring in-depth guides from expert genealogists including Mary Evans OBE, Janet Few, and Dr Penny Walters. The videos are free to Family Tree subscribers (print or digital edition) or can rented for as little as £1.99. Watch the videos at: www.family-tree.co.uk/videos

New weekly newsletter
We're now sending out a new weekly email each Monday, packed with more inspiration, hints and tips to get family historians motivated for the coming week. The email also gives genealogy organisations the chance to share their activities and offers. The newsletter is FREE, sign up at: www.family-tree.co.uk/account/register

Special offers to keep reading Family Tree
We’ve introduced a special subscription offer: get your first three issues for just £3 and we’ll deliver them straight to your door. After your first three issues the subscription changes to a quarterly Direct Debit of £10.99. Whilst we hope readers will want to continue receiving it through the post, we’re relaxing our minimum term rule so subscriptions can be cancelled after three issues without charge. Find out more at: https://familytr.ee/3for3sale

The digital edition of Family Tree features videos, audio and image galleries in addition to the wide range of guides, hints, tips and updates. The digital edition also features an ‘Easy-reader’ option so you can read the text at a size that suits you. Find out more and take advantage of our latest offers at: https://pocketmags.com/family-tree-magazine/issues

(With thanks to Helen Tovey and Lauren Freeman)


NB: The current edition of Family Tree includes my masterclass article on parish registers from the UK, Ireland, and the British diaspora.

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 30 March 2020

How to obtain WDYTYA? magazine from home

You may not find it so easy just now to go out an buy your favourite genealogy magazines in the UK. I've just received an email from the team at Who Do You Think You Are? magazine advising on ways that you can do so, without having to visit the shops just now.

If you want a copy of the April issue, still on sale for another week, you can order it via MagsDirect: https://magsdirect.co.uk/magazine/who-do-you-think-you-are-apr-20-163/

It’s exactly the same price as it is on the newsstand with free delivery and if you order before midday you should get next day delivery.

WDYTYA is also launching a way of ordering just three issues (starting with the June issue) with a cash payment of just £13.39. This is ideal for those of you who don’t want the commitment of a direct debit subscription: https://www.buysubscriptions.com/print/who-do-you-think-you-are-magazine-subscription

Hopefully this should help!

NB: In the current April issue you will find my feature on how to do family history on a budget, which may also be a timely help!


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

TheGenealogist releases Essex tithe maps

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

Changing times in the latest map release from TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist has released the Colour Tithe Maps for Essex with full integration with its MapExplorer™. This release allows us to see the area in West Ham, Essex on which the ExCel centre now stands and to discover the changes from Victorian pasture land, to dock complex then Exhibition venue and now to the Nightingale Hospital as the Covid-19 emergency builds.

This versatile tool can give the family history researcher a fantastic insight into what our ancestors’ city, town or village looked like over a number of periods and can also help them to find an ancestor’s property. With the addition of georeferenced Colour Tithe Maps. TheGenealogist has also today released colour tithe maps for Essex – you can search these as normal or browse them on Map Explorer™.

Joining the georeferenced Lloyd George Data Layer, Headstones and War Memorials, the Colour Tithe Maps are an important enhancement of the ever-expanding Map Explorer™.
  • The Map Explorer™ displays maps for historical periods up to the modern day.
  • Colour Tithe maps bring the early Victorian era to this innovative tool
  • Plots on the maps are linked to the apportionment books, enabling researchers to locate where their ancestors lived or worked

TheGenealogist has linked these highly detailed Tithe maps to the apportionment book records so providing researchers with the details of the plots, their owners and their occupiers at the time of the early Victorian survey. The coverage ranges from large estate owners to ordinary people occupying small plots such as a homestead or a cottage. Colour Tithe Maps make it easier for the researcher to understand the terrain as the streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, houses and trees are often highlighted in different colours.

TheGenealogist’s Colour Tithe Maps now cover the counties of Buckinghamshire, Cumberland, Huntingdonshire, Middlesex, Northumberland, Rutland, Surrey, Westmorland, the City, North and East Ridings of Yorkshire along with the new addition this week of Essex.

Subscribers to TheGenealogist’s Diamond membership can now view the latest colour or grayscale maps when using the Tithe & Landowner records.

TheGenealogist’s powerful Map Explorer™ has been developed to view these georeferenced historic maps overlaid on top of modern background maps including those from Ordnance Survey and Bing Street maps, as well as a satellite view. With the Map Explorer™, you can search for an ancestor's property, discovering its site, even if the road has changed or is no longer there.

Alternatively, using the Master Search on TheGenealogist, having found your forebear listed in the Tithe Records you can click through to the Map Explorer™ which will also show War Memorials or cemeteries on the various maps.

Read TheGenealogist’s article here:
https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2020/essex-tithe-maps-reveal-ever-changing-landscape-1239/


(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 29 March 2020

Scottish GENES - weekly digest

It's been another downer of a week worldwide on the coronavirus front, with some genealogy developments included, but there are some other more positive stories also - I certainly think this has been my busiest week ever on the blogging front.

If you missed them during the week, here are the latest posts from Scottish GENES (https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com):


If you write genealogy content you should consider registering with the ALCS
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/if-you-write-genealogy-content-you.html

Free access to MyHeritage in Color until April 23rd
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/free-access-to-myheritage-in-color.html

Have you used... the Scottish Mining Website?
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/have-you-used-scottish-mining-website.html

PRIMER: How do I research my Scottish family history?
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/primer-how-do-i-research-my-scottish.html

Northern Ireland's PRONI archive suspends enquiries service
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/northern-irelands-proni-archive.html

The Genealogy Show 2020 in Birmingham cancelled
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/the-genealogy-show-2020-in-birmingham.html

Ancestry provides free access to nearly 500m US National Archives Records
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/ancestrys-response-to-coronavirus-crisis.html

Ancestry adds Newgate calendars and Household Cavalry records
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/ancestry-adds-newgate-calendars-and.html

Next Scotland 1750-1850 - Beyond the OPRs course starts May 4th
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/next-scotland-1750-1850-beyond-oprs.html

Suspension of UK birth registration and other services
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/suspension-of-uk-birth-registration-and.html

County Kerry records added to RootsIreland
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/county-kerry-records-added-to.html

Highland Archives urges people to record diaries during pandemic
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/highland-archives-urges-people-to.html

FindmyPast adds records for Kilmarnock in Ayrshire
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/findmypast-adds-records-for-kilmarnock.html

WDYTYA Magazine's weekly Transcription Tuesday events
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/wdytya-magazines-weekly-transcription.html

Latest additions to the British Newspaper Archive
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/latest-additions-to-british-newspaper.html

Canada's BIFHSGO Conference in September postponed
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/canadas-bifhsgo-conference-in-september.html

Have you used... Tobar an Dualchais?
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/have-you-used-tobar-dualchais.html

FamilySearch cannot expand access to restricted records
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/familysearch-cannot-expand-records.html

Free access to U.S. Census records on MyHeritage
https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/free-access-to-us-census-records-on.html

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Free access to U.S. Census records on MyHeritage

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

The 2020 U.S Census is currently underway and households across America are already responding over the internet, by phone, or by paper questionnaire.

To mark this once-a-decade milestone, searching and viewing all of our U.S. census collections is completely free from March 29th until April 5th, 2020.

U.S. Censuses have been taken every ten years since the very first U.S. Census in 1790, after the end of the American Revolution. There have been 22 federal censuses since then.
What can census records reveal about your family?

Census records contain valuable information just waiting to be discovered. They provide a unique view into the lives of your ancestors at the time of the census, making them a basic foundation of family history research.

Each record typically includes details such as the names of household members, ages, places of birth, residence, occupation, immigration, citizenship details, marriage information, military service and more. Some older U.S. censuses recorded religious affiliation as well.

Census records can reveal information about the daily lives of your ancestors that can be added to your family tree. By comparing multiple censuses, you can trace your family over the years, and often from location to location throughout the country.

Census records can also lead to new connections and relatives. You may be searching for one ancestor and discover additional family members or friends living in the same household whom you knew nothing about.

With over 700 million records from 54 collections in total — 18 federal census collections and 36 state or country census collections — you’re bound to make some fascinating family history discoveries among our U.S. census records.

We hope you enjoy searching these collections free of charge, and that it enhances your family history research.

NB: Access the records at https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-1100/us-census

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

FamilySearch cannot expand access to restricted records

A few folk have been asking whether FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org) can expand access to the records which are normally only accessible at its centres. A message from FamilySearch now pops up at the top of my page, as follows:

Due to contractual obligations, FamilySearch cannot offer expanded access to historical records that are restricted to family history centers and affiliate libraries, despite the temporary closure of these facilities. We apologize for the inconvenience caused by COVID-19 precautionary measures.

In the meantime, we encourage you to explore the vast record collections that are available on FamilySearch. Millions of new indexed records and images are added weekly. And if you haven’t used our new Explore Historical Images tools, you might be surprised at the potential discoveries you can make in our growing unindexed image collections. We appreciate your patience, loyalty, and support.

So that's that.

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 28 March 2020

Have you used... Tobar an Dualchais?

In April my next book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, will be published. To pave the way, every week until publication I will flag up a key site or resource that you may not be aware of if you are new to genealogy, or which you may have overlooked if researching for a while, which might just help with your Scottish research!

This week... Tobar an Dualchais.

The University of Edinburgh funded Tobar an Dualchais/A Kist o Riches website at www.tobarandualchais.co.uk hosts some 50,000 recordings of stories, songs, music and poetry in both Gaelic and Scots, as recorded since the 1930s, which have been sourced from the School of Scottish Studies (University of Edinburgh), BBC Scotland and the National Trust for Scotland's Canna Collection.

Have fun!

* Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet is available for pre-order now at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Scottish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/17717.


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Canada's BIFHSGO Conference in September postponed

The British Isles Family History Society of Greater Ottawa (BIFHSGO) has announced the postponement of its forthcoming conference from September 25th-27th:

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the uncertain situation over the coming months, BIFHSGO’s Board of Directors and Conference Planning Committee regret to announce the postponement of our annual family history conference which was scheduled to be held 25–27 September 2020.

Our sincere thanks to all those involved with planning the conference, particularly the dedicated volunteers who have already put significant efforts into planning this year’s event. To our speakers, regular exhibitors and partners, thank you for your understanding and continued support. We would especially like to thank the staff of Ben Franklin Place for their appreciation of our situation and generosity in minimizing our losses.

Although this is disappointing, it is only a postponement. The conference will be scheduled for the fall of 2021 with the same themes and, hopefully, the same speakers.

Duncan Monkhouse, President BIFHSGO and Conference Co-Chair (Program), and Jane Down, Conference Co-Chair (Administrative)

The society has also announced that due to the pandemic emergency in Ontario, its forthcoming weekly meetings for April and May are also postponed. For further information on BIFHSGO's events, keep an eye out on the society's website at https://bifhsgo.ca.


(With thanks to John Reid via Canada's Anglo-Celtic Connections at https://anglo-celtic-connections.blogspot.com/2020/03/bifhsgo-conference-2020-postponement.html)

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Latest additions to the British Newspaper Archive

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) has the following additions noted for the last 30 days:

Truth
1885, 1894-1897, 1900-1902, 1906-1907, 1910

North Wilts Herald
1867-1895, 1897-1941

Home News for India, China and the Colonies
1847-1865

Crewe Chronicle
1874-1887, 1889-1972

Halifax Evening Courier
1893-1896, 1900, 1910

Midland Counties Advertiser
1854-1875, 1881, 1885, 1892-1896, 1941, 1943, 1946

Scarborough Gazette
1850, 1855, 1868

Newcastle Journal
1936-1937

Huddersfield Daily Examiner
1874

Torbay Express and South Devon Echo
1958-1967, 1969-1972

Leicester Daily Mercury
1926, 1931

Harrow Observer
1980

Kensington Post
1986

Newcastle Evening Chronicle
1893

Merthyr Express
1871-1897, 1899-1910, 1912-1945

Burton Chronicle
1896, 1898-1906

Carlow Sentinel
1832-1920

Newtownards Chronicle & Co. Down Observer
1875-1879, 1881-1900

Bradford Weekly Telegraph
1869-1878, 1882-1896, 1898-1899, 1901-1903, 1905-1906, 1913-1917

South Wales Gazette
1894, 1896

Welshman
1832-1843, 1845-1847, 1852, 1854, 1859, 1866, 1877-1879, 1889-1890, 1895, 1912

Nuneaton Observer
1877-1896, 1898-1912

Sligo Independent
1885

Batley Reporter and Guardian
1869-1897, 1899-1907

Call (London)
1916, 1918-1920

Batley News
1883-1907

Barnsley Independent
1855-1871, 1873-1875, 1877, 1882, 1888, 1897, 1912, 1916, 1918-1919, 1921, 1926, 1928

Surrey Advertiser
1898

Aberdeen Press and Journal
1972-1974

Royal Gazette of Jamaica
1779-1781, 1793-1794, 1809, 1811-1819, 1824-1828, 1834-1836, 1838-1840

Western Evening Herald
1897-1898

Brecon County Times
1871

Ballymoney Free Press and Northern Counties Advertiser
1870, 1873-1934

Freedom (London)
1906-1927

Blyth News
1906, 1908, 1912, 1941-1950

The Bioscope
1910

Brighouse News
1897

Aberdeen Evening Express
1974




Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

WDYTYA Magazine's weekly Transcription Tuesday events

Who Do You Think You Are? magazine (www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com) and Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) have joined forces to arrange another Transciption Tuesday event for this coming March 31st, in what looks to be the first of a new series of 'weekly challenges'.

The first effort hopes to see volunteers transcribe records from a collection at England's National Archives, entitled England, Criminal Lunatic Asylum Registers, 1820-1843.

For more information on what you need to do to take part, visit the magazine's website at http://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/blog/transcription-tuesday-weekly-challenge-ancestry-prison-records. Despite the collection title, it also holds records relating to convict, ship and local prisons, and not just asylums.


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 27 March 2020

FindmyPast adds records for Kilmarnock in Ayrshire

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) has added a small number of collections as created by East Ayrshire Family History Society (www.eastayrshirefhs.co.uk):

Scotland, Ayrshire, Kilmarnock Valuation Roll 1874
Trace ancestors who owned or rented land in Kilmarnock with these valuation roll records from 1874. Transcripts with the most important family tree details, as well as digital copies of the original records can reveal:

Landlord's and/or tenant's names
Addresses
Description of the property
How much rent was paid

Scotland's valuation rolls recorded the people, properties and taxes for each county and burgh in the country between 1855 and 1996.

(NB: Additional valuation rolls for Scotland from 1855-1940 are available on www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk)

Scotland, Ayrshire, Kilmarnock Ratepayers 1838-1846
These unique records of ratepayers in Kilmarnock could reveal your Scottish ancestors' names, occupations and addresses.

Scotland, Ayrshire, Kilmarnock Voters Lists 1837-1852
We're rounding-off our exclusive Kilmarnock collection with these fascinating electoral records. A combination of the records' transcripts and digitised images of the original documents can reveal:

Names
Occupations
Addresses
Your ancestor's chosen candidate
Those who didn't vote

At the time these records were taken, the right to vote in Scotland was not universal. Only owners or tenants of residences worth more than £10 could vote, provided all of their taxes had been paid for the previous year.

Newspapers
Brand new to the site is:

* Crewe Chronicle covering the years 1874-1887 and 1889-1972

A list of papers that have had more pages added and the years covered:

* Halifax Evening Courier has been updated with editions from 1893-1896
* Midland Counties Advertiser has been updated with editions from 1854-1875, 1881, 1885, 1892-1896, 1941, 1943 and 1946
* Scarborough Gazette has been updated with editions from 1850, 1855 and 1868
* Newcastle Journal has been updated with editions from 1936-1937
* Huddersfield Daily Examiner has been updated with editions from 1874
* Torbay Express and South Devon Echo has been updated with editions from 1958-1967 and 1969-1972
* Leicester Daily Mercury has been updated with editions from 1926 and 1931
* Harrow Observer has been updated with editions from 1980
* Kensington Post has been updated with editions from 1986
* Newcastle Evening Chronicle has been updated with editions from 1893

For further details, and links, visit https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/exclusive-kilmarnock-records


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 26 March 2020

Highland Archives urges people to record diaries during pandemic

From Highland Archives (https://www.highlifehighland.com/archives-service/):

Welcome to the Spring 2020 Highland Archive Service newsletter. At the time of writing we are, as many of you will be, working from home and adjusting to a different way of living and delivering our services as all of our archive centres are temporarily closed due to COVID-19. Over the coming weeks and months, in addition to remotely responding to enquiries and continuing our Family History research service, we will be creating digital resource packs for parents teaching from home, putting together resources for older people and delivering some live chats on Facebook to keep our community together in these unusual times. If you work in a Care Home, or are supporting a vulnerable person please let us know if we can provide resources. We'll also be sharing regular posts on Twitter and Facebook giving an insight into all the things our staff are working on in their hastily-created home offices! In addition, those of us who are able will be volunteering with the Highland Council to help deliver essential services and provide support to our communities where it is needed most.

As you know, we are in the midst of a global pandemic and people's lives are changing like never before. The Highland Archive Service is putting out a call for people living in the Highlands to keep diaries of their daily experiences and the impact on their family/work/life. Over the coming months we would be love to add your diaries to our collections so they can form part of the Highlands' collective memory going forwards.


For the full newsletter visit https://mailchi.mp/highlifehighland/highland-archive-service-1095129?e=36f4314bac

I suggested something similar a couple of weeks ago (see https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/03/documenting-present.html), and have regularly been keeping a diary since then (indeed, this blog is fulfilling a similar function from a genealogy perspective).

As much as we need to survive the present, we are also witnesses to history - what we record today will inform the future.

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

County Kerry records added to RootsIreland

From RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.ie):

New Kerry Records & Special Offer Reminder

We are delighted to announce the addition of 220,000 Roman Catholic baptismal and marriage records from County Kerry to the Roots Ireland database at www.rootsireland.ie/kerry. These records are as follows:

Ardfert (marriages, 1859-1900; baptisms, 1859-1900)
Ballybunion (baptisms, 1831-1901)
Ballyheigue (baptisms, 1858-1900)
Ballylongford (baptisms, 1823-1900)
Cahirciveen (baptisms, 1845-1900; marriages, 1863-1900)
Cahirdaniel (baptisms, 1893-1910; marriages, 1831-1910)
Castleisland (baptisms, 1823-1900; marriages, 1822-1900)
Castlemaine (baptisms, 1804-1900)
Causway (marriages, 1809-1900)
Dromod (baptisms, 1850-1901; marriages, 1850-1900)
Duagh (marriages, 1827-1911)
Fossa (baptisms, 1857-1902; marriages, 1857-1916)
Glenbeigh/Glencar (baptisms, 1825-1900)
Glenbeigh (marriages, 1829-1898)
Glencar (marriages, 1871-1884)
Glengarriffe (baptisms, 1846-1877; marriages, 1847-1875)
Kenmare (baptisms, 1819-1900; marriages, 1819-1907);
Killarney (baptisms, 1785-1900; marriages, 1792-1900)
Spa (baptisms, 1866-1920; marriages, 1867-1915)
Tarbert (baptisms, 1859-1900; marriages, 1859-1900)
Tuosist (baptisms, 1844-1891; marriages, 1879-1882).

For the list of records for Kerry, and to search these records, go to www.rootsireland.ie/kerry.

And don't forget our special offer which is running for only a few more days - 25% off an annual subscription. To obtain this offer just go to the following link and login using your existing RootsIreland login details: http://www.rootsireland.ie. If you currently have a subscription, click My Account, My Subscription and Start a New Subscription. The special deal subscription will then begin once your current subscription runs out.

Yours Sincerely
rootsireland.ie


(With thanks to RootsIreland via email)

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Suspension of UK birth registration and other services

I noticed a tweet earlier from Jane Roberts suggesting that birth registrations have been suspended in Leeds, England, in line with GRO guidance, but that this should not affect the ability to claim Universal Credit or Child Benefit. A quick search online has shown many other registration offices in England similarly suspending the ability to register births, which in England normally has to be carried out within 42 days. This for example, is the advice on the Bracknell Forest registrar's site:

All birth registration appointments are suspended under the guidance of the General Register Office. In light of the current pandemic, you can now make a claim for child benefit or universal credit prior to the birth being registered.

The Hartlepool office suggests this as a consequence of measures brought in by the UK government:

On 23 March the Government introduced new measures to reduce the spread of coronavirus. During this period birth registration appointments have been suspended. The requirement for a birth to be registered before you are able to claim for Child Benefit or Universal Credit has been removed during this period.

I have been informed, however, that some services across the country are still in operation, at least for now, so check with your local registrar's office for its latest advice.


In Scotland, where births must be registered within 21 days, it seems a similar provision is now being implemented. The following is from the Glasgow registrar service:

All birth registration appointments are postponed with immediate effect. There is no need to worry about the 21 day time limit as extensions will be in place. Please continue to refer to our website for further updates during this time.

And on marriage,the following has also been posted by Glasgow:

Marriage

Following Government advice there will be no ceremonies taking place with immediate effect.

If you have had to postpone your ceremony due to the health pandemic and wish to re-arrange a new date, please note that fresh marriage notice forms will not need to be submitted for a date fixed this year and no additional notice fees will be payable. For a date fixed in 2021 fresh marriage notice forms will need to be submitted, however no additional notice fees will be payable.

Marriage Schedules will not be issued for forthcoming ceremonies until further notice.

Schedules for ceremonies that have already taken place should be returned by post to Registrars, City Chambers Mail Room, George Square, Glasgow G2 1DU.

Marriage/Civil Partnership Notice Forms - We will no longer accept these in person and they must be posted along with daytime contact details, including email to:- Registration Office, Mail Room, City Chambers, George Square, Glasgow G2 1DU. Please only send the forms in if it is for a date that would appear to be out with the current restrictive period.

Additional registration service changes are listed at https://www.glasgow.gov.uk/coronavirus


Edinburgh has also noted the following:

Registration of births has been postponed until further notice. Births will be notified to DWP without being registered for the moment. Registrars are notified when a birth takes place prior to registration. 

As soon as the legislation is changed to allow this to happen we will forward the notification. We will update the website as soon as we have permission to pass the information on.

Please do not post or email the card issued from the hospital to the Registrar. It is extremely important that you keep these in your possession. These will be required when the baby’s birth is finally registered.

The registration of deaths is the priority of the registration service at this time

Guidance on further events in Edinburgh is at https://www.edinburgh.gov.uk/births-marriages-deaths/urgent-message/1


There are also changes in Northern Ireland, where it seems pregistration of births is possible through a local GP - this is from the Belfast City Council site:

Coronavirus update

You can now register your child, without the HS123 registration form, at your GP practice.

You will need the following information when you contact them:

Your child’s health and care number. You will find this in the red book from the hospital.
Full name of the child.

The home address that your child will live at.
We are unable to register births until further notice.

If you have any queries, please email registrar@belfastcity.gov.uk and we will contact you as soon as possible.


And from Swansea in Wales:

Please do not attend the Register Office in person unless you have a pre-arranged appointment or in the event of an emergency. If you are feeling unwell or have recently travelled abroad, please contact the office regarding your appointment/registration.

We are currently only accepting payment by card. We won't be accepting cash.


I am unclear just now whether such changes are mandatory at present, and thus universal across the UK, or simply following guidelines from the relevant governments. The bottom line is to check with your local registration service, and to plan accordingly.

(With thanks to @JaneElRoberts and @ChalfontR) 


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 25 March 2020

Next Scotland 1750-1850 - Beyond the OPRs course starts May 4th

I'm half way through teaching the Pharos Tutors course Scottish Research Online just now, but I am already preparing updated material for the next course Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Registers, which will be starting in just over a month's time on May 4th, and running for five weeks.

The following is a description of the course:

This is an intermediate level course in Scottish family history for those who are going back beyond 1850. You should have some experience with research in the Old Parochial Registers of the Church of Scotland and in using major websites for Scottish research. This course discusses sources that fill the gap when the OPRs are uninformative or missing; for example, records of parish and town administration, occupations, land transfer and taxation. Using these records involves several different locations. You will learn how to check online finding aids and how to find the most effective way to obtain records that may be online, in print, on CD or microfilm. This is the second course on Scottish research. If you have not taken Scottish Research Online please check its description.

Lesson Headings:

* Kirk Sessions records and parish poor
* Burgh records and town poor
* Occupations, taxation and early lists
* Land transfer and the value of sasines
* Land, inheritance and estates

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat session per week. See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: "well structured chats with opportunities for questions as well"

Relevant Countries: Scotland
Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 4 May 2020
Cost: £49.99

The following video also gives a bit more of a flavour about what to expect:



(Available also at https://youtu.be/1vX6GZtwZJ0)

For further details, and to sign up, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302.

Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs has been designed as a follow on course from the Scottish Research Online course, although it can certainly be signed up for if you already have the same level of knowledge as given from the earlier course.

However, because of the currently crazy times we live in, I have arranged with Pharos to run an extra Scottish Research Online course in a couple of months time, from June 8th, which may be of interest if by then you are climbing the walls in self-isolation, and looking for something to help pass the time! You can find more about this course, and sign up for it, at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102.

I'll hopefully see you online soon!

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Ancestry adds Newgate calendars and Household Cavalry records

Two new collections on Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) for the UK:

UK, Household Cavalry Records of Service, 1799-1920
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/61804/
Source: WO 400: WO 400, War Office: Household Cavalry, 1799-1920,.. WO 400: WO 400, War Office: Household Cavalry, 1799-1920, The National Archives, Kew, Surrey, England

This collection contains surviving records of service for non-commissioned officers and other ranks who served in the Life Guards, the Royal Horse Guards and the Household Battalion, and whose Army service concluded in these regiments.

The following information can be found in the records where available:

Name
Regiment and rank
Next of kin
Medical reports and pension details
Age
Birth date
Relation to head
Marital status
Gender
Enlistment and muster date
Place of birth


London, England, Newgate Calendar of Prisoners, 1785-1853
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/61811/
Source: Series HO77. Newgate calendars HO 77, The National Archives, Kew, Surrey, England

This collection contains a calendar of prisoners for the years 1785 to 1853. These calendars consist of lists, for the most part printed, of prisoners tried at Assizes and Quarter Sessions.

The following information can be found in the records where available:

Name
Age
Birth date
Occupation
Date of trial
Offence
Sentence
Place of arrest

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 24 March 2020

Ancestry provides free access to nearly 500m US National Archives Records

From the CEO of Ancestry (www.ancestry.com)

To our community,

As the global effect of COVID-19 continues to evolve, Ancestry is committed to the health and safety of our employees and members and serving our community. Our hearts go out to anyone in our worldwide family who may be affected by COVID-19.

I believe it’s important that we approach this time of uncertainty with a sense of calm and responsibility – for our families, colleagues and our members. While most of our employees across the globe are working from home, we all remain committed to continuing to deliver great experiences and value, including launching new content collections and features to empower your journeys of personal discovery. This also includes being here to answer your questions. Our Member Services team is here to help and we appreciate your patience as we navigate this new way of working.

We are continuing to closely monitor the situation and wanted to take a moment to summarize some of the things we are doing to support our community during this time of uncertainty:

At-home educational resources for families and teachers: With parents educating their kids at home and teachers looking for creative ways to administer assignments, new virtual ways of learning are on the rise. Ancestry is making teacher-developed lesson plans available for free for anyone to download, covering a range of educational topics for various ages. For more information, click here.

Helping to ease the isolation from social distancing with new connections: Ancestry has collaborated with the U.S. National Archives and Records Administration to offer temporary free access to millions of historical records and images from the federal government. And we will continue providing free online tutorials and video courses to help people get started with family tree building. For more information, click here.

Collaborating to address the COVID-19 global pandemic: Finding new ways to use science to advance our understanding of ourselves and our health is core to who we are. Genomics has the power to unlock insights into different traits, diseases and certain health conditions, so Ancestry’s team of scientists is working to see how we can best leverage our expertise, network and connectivity to advance efforts to combat COVID-19. We will share more with you, including how you can help, as these efforts evolve.

This is just the start and we will continue to look for ways to help our members and communities across the world navigate through this challenging time. In this time of social distancing, we all have the opportunity to forge closer bonds with family while empowering each other to keep in contact with those who are most vulnerable and practice kindness toward everyone.

If we have learned anything over the years, it is that we are all connected. We will get through this as a global family. We are all in this together.

Thank you for continuing to be a vibrant part of our community.

Margo Georgiadis
President & CEO
Ancestry

(Source: https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2020/03/24/a-note-from-ancestrys-ceo/)

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

The Genealogy Show 2020 in Birmingham cancelled

The Genealogy Show (https://thegenealogyshow.uk), to be held in Birmingham on Friday 26th and Saturday 27th June 2020, has been cancelled. The show will return to Birmingham on Friday 25th and Saturday 26th June 2021.


Click on the image below for the full announcement, which includes advice for those who have already purchased tickets.


(With thanks to @THEGenShow2020)

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Northern Ireland's PRONI archive suspends enquiries service

From the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni):

PRONI & COVID-19

Last week, we advised that the the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland would be closed to the public until further notice in light of the ongoing COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic.

Whilst we aimed to continue to respond to written enquiries and operate our fee-paying search and copying service, we are no longer able to provide this.

In line with guidance on social distancing, from 23 March our staff are no longer working from the PRONI building and will be unable to respond to any written enquiries or operate a fee-paying search and copying service until further notice.

The health and welfare of our staff and visitors remains our primary concern during this rapidly evolving situation. We appreciate your understanding at this time and hope you all stay safe and well.

A range of digitised records, databases and other resources remain available online at www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

PRIMER: How do I research my Scottish family history?

I've put together a quick primer if you have just suddenly found yourself with time at home, and need something to fill it with, or if you know anyone else who might be interested. I hope it helps!

To start researching your Scottish family history, you need to work out when people were born, married (if they did) and died. To do this, you need to access the records available online at ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk), which cost £7.50 for 30 credits.

Scottish birth records note when and where a child was born, the names of its parents, when he or she married (if they did), the name of the informant, and when registered.

Knowing the birth date and the names of the parents allows you to later establish when they married - the marriage records include both spouses ages and names of their parents (so you can confirm you have the right record). You can also then work out when they died, as Scottish death records should also note the names of the parents in death records, as well as the deceased's age, and the names of any spouses of the deceased. Death records for women can be searched for by maiden surname and married name.

From the birth record, the date and place of the parents' marriage should allow you to locate that record on ScotlandsPeople, which in turn will give you their ages when they married, and the names of both sets of their parents. From this, you can then also check when each of them were born, and later when they died.

In all records, birth, marriage and death, the names of the parents should match (although there may be some spelling variation) for the person concerned.

That's the theory. It doesn't always work. But mostly it does!

Key thing - Scottish civil registration started in 1855. For privacy reasons, records for births are only available online if over 100 years, marriages if over 75 years, and deaths if over 50 years, although indexes arre available for more recent records. So you may need to dig out some records at home first, or ask your elderly auntie for any info she can give you!

Prior to 1855, you then need to look to church records. The main groupings of records for these, alos on ScotlandsPeople, are the Church of Scotland's Old Parish Records (OPRs), Other churches (Presbyterian churches which broke away from the Church of Scotland), and Roman Catholic Parish Registers (CPRs). The records are not as detailed as civil records after 1855, at least, in most cases.

Some tips - errors creep in to all records, based on who the informant was. The most accurate records are marriage records - the spouses gave their details directly to the registrar (children's parents are informant at birth, and any and their aunty can be the informant at death, and not know the correct info!).

From 1841-1911, Scottish census records, also available on ScotlandsPeople, will tell you who was in the family household, and help you to understand how big the family was (kids etc). They can help to fill in the gaps.

You'll find a lot more information about these records on ScotlandsPeople, but in summary, to build a tree, this is what you are hopefully going to get from the records in terms of key details:

Births: name of child, parents names, when and where they married
Marriages: names of spouses, their ages, names of their parents
Deaths: name of deceased, names of any spouses, age at death, names of both parents

You will also find additional detail such as occupations, addresses, and status of parents (i.e. alive or deceased).

You will also need to store the information you find, and to build the actual family tree!

Many family history website offer free platforms on which to build a family tree, including Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk), FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk), TreeView (https://treeview.co.uk) and MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com). All offer FREE basic accounts - you should not have to take out a paid subscription - although free accounts may have some restrictions in terms of tree size etc. Certainly enough to get you started though!

Beyond this, there is a tonne of stuff you can chase up on other sites and sources. But establishing births, marriages and deaths, and how people relate to each other, is certainly the starting point.

Have fun!


NB: I'll put together further basic primers on Irish and English research in the coming days also.

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 23 March 2020

Have you used... the Scottish Mining Website?

In April my next book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, will be published. To pave the way, every week until publication I will flag up a key site or resource that you may not be aware of if you are new to genealogy, or which you may have overlooked if researching for a while, which might just help with your Scottish research!

This week... a resource to help with Scottish miners.

The Scottish Mining Website at www.scottishmining.co.uk is a true gem if your ancestor was a miner. The platform's resources are drawn from old reports, gazetteers and newspaper articles, with information offered on a variety of topics, including life in mining towns and villages, working conditions, accidents and strikes, housing, health and leisure, war memorials, and considerably more. The site focusses on the coal, iron and shale mining industries in Scotland, and includes a superb mining accident section with annual listings of fatalities from 1852-1944, as well as pre-1852 lists and post-Second World War records.

Have fun!

* Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet is available for pre-order now at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Scottish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/17717.


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Free access to MyHeritage in Color until April 23rd

From Daniel Horowitz at MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

I’m happy to share that we’re giving everyone FREE and unlimited access to MyHeritage In Color™ from March 23 to April 23, so that people everywhere can join in the fun of colorizing their black and white photos. Ordinarily only 10 photos can be colorized by users who do not have a Complete plan, but now, you can colorize as many photos as you’d like for free.

Colorizing photos is the perfect activity for anyone who is isolated at home. We invite everyone to pull out their family photo albums, colorize their photos, and start reminiscing. Over the coming month, anyone who shares their colorized photos on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram with the hashtag #ColorBeatsCoronavirusBlues and tags @MyHeritage will enter a weekly draw. Each week we’ll select one lucky winner who will receive a free MyHeritage Complete subscription!

You can access the feature at https://www.myheritage.com/incolor

Have fun!





(With thanks to Daniel)

Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 22 March 2020

If you write genealogy content you should consider registering with the ALCS

The following may be of interest to genealogists in the UK who earn some of their income by writing articles for magazines or books.

I have been doing this for a fair few years now, but only last year was encouraged by a publisher to sign up to a body called the Authors' Licensing and Collecting Society (ALCS) to receive royalties from libraries etc for the secondary rights use of books and magazine articles I have written. The bottom line is if you have written articles and/or parts of books etc which are then copied or used by libraries and other agencies in other ways, including lending rights, you may actually be due a royalty for this, on top of the sum you were paid by the publisher up front.

I thought I'll give it a go, and entered in details of all I've written from 2016-2019 (the most recent period for which such royalties may be available), expecting that I might get a couple of hundred quid if lucky. I've just got word of what I am due in a few days time, and nearly had a heart attack. Suffice to say it was a good idea to register.

If you write for any publisher, you may wish to consider signing up to the ALCS at www.alcs.co.uk and regularly enter details of articles and books you may have written, and give details of both print and e-editions. There is a membership fee (£36), and a commission to pay, but the benefit may outweigh the outlay. Payments are made twice a year, and there may be money you have earned sitting there for the taking.

You will find more about how the scheme works on the website - I hope it helps!

(PS: Next deadline for submissions is November 30th)


Chris

You can pre-order my new book, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 (out April). Also available, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.