Sunday, 31 October 2021

Scottish ViC conference on January 22nd 2022

The following comes from the Scottish ViC virtual conference:

Registration for ViC 2022 is now OPEN

This year, all presenters will be live and we will be recording the sessions so that you can view them during waking hours.

A reminder of our topics and presenters:

Jimmy Smith giving a presentation on the Scottish Covenanters
Hugh Allison giving a presentation on the Jacobites
Ciaran Jones giving a presentation on the Scottish Witchcraft Database
Matthew J Smith giving a presentation on the British Slave Owners Database

You can register on the ViC website: https://www.genealogyvic.com/ViC-2022

(With thanks to Christine Woodcock)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Hallowe'en is coming and the goose is getting fat

A Hallowe'en rhyming song from my childhood in Northern Ireland (none of your trick and treat nonsense!):

Hallowe'en is coming and the goose is getting fat
Would ye please put a penny in the auld man's hat?
If ye haven't got a penny, a ha'penny will do
If ye haven't got a ha'penny, then God bless you
And yer auld man too.

Ignore anyone telling you it's a Christmas song - not in Norn Iron it wasn't...!

Whether you can go guising or not this year for Hallowe'en, I hope you can still have a good one! 😀


"Neep Lantern - Slide Scan" by the justified sinner is licensed with CC BY-NC-SA 2.0. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 30 October 2021

2022 SAFHS Conference - Hard Times

The next Scottish Association of Family History Societies conference is entitled Hard Times, and will be held on Saturday 9th April 2022, online via Zoom.

For further details, please visit https://www.safhs.org.uk/conference.php


Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 29 October 2021

FindmyPast adds Scottish witches and wrongdoers for Halloween

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) has added the following collections this week:

Scotland, Names of Witches 1658
In this small but spooky collection, you’ll find details on some of those accused of witchcraft in early modern Scotland. 1563’s Witchcraft Act made consorting with witches or taking part in witchcraft a crime punishable by death in Scotland. Around 1,500 people were executed, most of them women, until the last Scottish witch trial in 1727.
(Source: Wellcome Collection, Names of the Witches (in Scotland), 1658, MS.3658)

Scotland, Court & Criminal Database
Unlock criminals and victims in your Scottish family tree with this detail-rich collection. The records include names, occupations, addresses and information about the crimes.
This resource comprises prison records, precognitions and trial papers from all over Scotland, as well as the Fife Kalendar of Convicts. From fiends and felons to bone-chilling revelations, where will the dark side of your Scottish family story take you?
(Source: Various, including Scottish court record indexes from Scottish Indexes)

For links and details of newspapers added to the site in the past week, visit https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/scotland-witches-criminals

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 28 October 2021

Online events from PRONI in November 2021

Forthcoming online events and surveys from the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni):

Getting Started Workshops: Using Online Resources
3 & 17 November, 12.30pm
Whether you are trying to do your own family tree online, researching for study or planning to visit PRONI and want to know how to find your references in advance - these virtual workshops will have something for you. An ideal opportunity for you to ask your questions directly to PRONI staff.

William Sharman and the politics of volunteering in Ulster 1781-1803
11 November, 7pm
Join us and The Ulster Society for Irish Historical Studies for a presentation by Professor Peter Gray on William Sharman (1731-1803), a country gentleman and revenue collector of Lisburn, one of the most active and respected figures within the Volunteering movement in Ulster.

Field Marshall Claude Auchinleck and the Indian Army 1914-1947
10 November, 8pm
Join us and the Antrim and Down branch of the Western Front Association for a presentation by Dr Timothy Bowman from the University of Kent on Sir Claude John Eyre Auchinleck, a British field marshal best known for his victory against General Erwin Rommel in North Africa during World War II.

Restoring history - have your say in the first State Care Monuments Survey
Survey closes 17 November
Department for Communities, Historic Environment Division, are inviting members of the public to take part in a short survey to find out what matters when caring for the 190 state care monuments in Northern Ireland. The survey is now open until 17 November. Click on the button below to take part.


Explore Your Archives Week 2021: Making the Future Take Over
20 – 28 November


Archiving COVID: Ordinary People and Stay Home Memories
22 November, 1pm
Join us for a presentation exploring the experiences and memories of the COVID-19 pandemic by local people and communities that have been archived at PRONI.

Researching Farming Ancestors at PRONI
23 November, 2pm
We are delighted to host a talk by Dr William Roulston, Research Director of Ulster Historical Foundation, to mark his recent publication Researching Farming Ancestors in Ireland.  

Making the Future presents: Border Sounds VR Experience
23 November, 3pm
Book your place to view our immersive new virtual reality (VR) film Border Sounds using a full VR kit. View the sights and sounds of the Irish Border as told by the people who live there.

Archi’ve Imagined: Artistic Responses to the Archives
24 November, 2pm
Join us to explore the many ways people have artistically responded to archive material. In partnership with Northern Ireland Screen, there will even be a chance to have a try yourself.

In Their Own Words: Children of Victorian Belfast
25 November, 2pm
We are delighted to host a talk by Dr Alice Johnson exploring childhood in Victorian Belfast. This original and lively talk will explore what it was like to grow up in a middle-class family in the dynamic and changing environment of a Victorian Irish industrial city.

Our Place: An Archive for Everyone
26 November, 2pm
Join us to explore how we’ve been working to diversify our collections, reach out to communities and gather stories. Meet PRONI staff through this engaging talk as they share their passion for collecting treasured historic archives and present day artefacts.  

To register for PRONI events, click on the above Eventbrite links.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 27 October 2021

Free Death Records access from MyHeritage for Halloween

From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):

Halloween is almost upon us, and to celebrate, MyHeritage is providing free access to all death records added to MyHeritage before October 2021 for one week only: October 27–November 2!

The records in this category include death, burial, and cemetery records as well as obituaries. These records are crucial sources of information for family researchers. Death certificates are typically issued within days of a death and can contain many details about a person’s life, such as their age at death, place of birth, parents’ names and origins, and the cause of death. The name of the person who provided these details may also be mentioned, and this can also be an important clue that can help you locate new relatives.

Burial and cemetery records can supplement death certificates and offer additional information, while obituaries may provide rich details about the person’s life: their interests, profession, passions, and connections in the community.

From last Halloween until the beginning of October, we added more than 37 million records to an already enormous collection of death records, burial records, cemetery records, and obituaries — bringing the total to 586,664,785 records. During that time, 11 collections were added or updated, including collections from Brazil, New Zealand, the United States, Poland, France, and more. So even if you’ve had a chance to peruse MyHeritage’s death record collection in the past, it’s worth taking a look to see if there’s anything new concerning your family history.

To search the MyHeritage death records collection visit https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-2030/death-burial-cemetery-obituaries.

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Irish Ordnance Survey Memoirs emigrants and seasonal workers data added to Ancestry

Ancestry has added a database entitled Ireland, Irish Emigration Lists, 1833-1839 at https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/62369/. Here is the blurb:

Ireland, Irish Emigration Lists, 1833-1839

Original data: Compiled Under the Direction of Brian Mitchell. Irish Emigration Lists, 1833-1839. Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc. Lists of Emigrants Extracted from the Ordnance Survey Memoirs for Counties Londonderry and Antrim.

About Ireland, Irish Emigration Lists, 1833-1839

General Collection Information

This collection contains an index for residents of County Antrim or County Derry~Londonderry in Northern Ireland who emigrated between 1833 and 1839. The records in this collection were compiled from notebooks kept during the Ordnance Survey of Ireland and are organised by county, church parish, and last name.

Using this Collection

Records may include the following information:

    Person’s name
    Age
    Year departed
    Name of county
    Name of town
    Name of parish
    Destination
    Religion
    Occupation
    Names of family members

Please note that the destinations contained in this collection are all ports and therefore may not have been your ancestor’s final destination. You may also notice that not all were immigrating to America or Canada; many were travelling to Glasgow or Liverpool. It’s possible that your ancestor was a seasonal migrant, or they may have been practicing what was known as “stepwise” migration. It wasn’t uncommon to purchase a cheap ticket to England or Scotland for seasonal work, and then use the money they earned to continue on to America.

In this collection, all religious denominations are abbreviated. Please see the following key to determine your ancestor’s religion:

    RC = Roman Catholic
    EC = Established Church
    P = Presbyterian
    S = Seceder
    I = Independent
    M = Methodist
    MO = Moravian
    COV = Covenanter
    BAP = Baptist


As Ancestry notes, the records include seasonal migrants to Britain, as recorded in the Ordnance Survey Memoir Books, but only from Counties Antrim and Londonderry. The following is the record for my four times great grandfather David Gordon, from Ballylumford townland in Islandmagee, as presented on Ancestry:

And as shown in the original published memoir for the parish of Islandmagee:


For some entries, you may get a slightly better understanding of when the information was recorded between 1833 and 1839 within the original published account. The account for Islandmagee was collated by James Boyle bertwen Jan 1835 and April 1840, and thus David's undated entry could not have been from 1833 or 1834. As can be seen above, some of the emigrant information above is more specifically dated, which is reflected in the database.

The original Ordnance Survey Memoir Books, which cover the northernmost counties only (not just Antrim and Londonderry), can be purchased from the Ulster Historical Foundation book store at https://www.booksireland.org.uk/store/ordnance-survey-memoirs. Think of them as the Irish equivalent of Scotland's Statistiscal Accounts!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

A talk on mapping Scotland's mountains with the NLS's Chris Fleet

A forthcoming online event from the National Library of Scotland on Thursday 18th November at 5pm-6pm:

A talk on mapping Scotland's mountains with the National Library of Scotland's Map Curator, Chris Fleet

About this event

In this fully illustrated talk, Map Curator Chris Fleet looks at how Scotland’s impressive mountains have been represented by map-makers over time. From line drawings to LiDAR, the story reflects changing knowledge and survey techniques, as well as map drafting and printing technologies, but it also reflects more significant changes in the perceptions of mountains and their importance over time.

To subscribe please visit www.eventbrite.ca/e/mapping-scotlands-mountains-tickets-181900999787.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

English and Welsh 1921 census to be released on 6 January 2022

If your ancestors were based down south a century ago, the National Archives (www.nationalrchives.gov.uk) in England has announced that the English and Welsh 1921 census (and I suspect that for the Isle of Man and Channel Islands, although not specifically mentioned) will be released on FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) on January 6th 2022. There will initially be a charge to access individual entries, at £2.50 for every record transcript, and £3.50 per original image for each record.

For further details of the release, and a programme of podcasts and webinars announced by the archive to tie in, please visit www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/1921-census-online-publication-date-announced/. FindmyPast has a separate announcement about the release at www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/family-records/1921-census.

Meanwhile in Scotland, the earliest that the same census is likely to be released is at the end of 2022 - the tender for work to be done to facilitate this was only put out by the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) in July of this year (see http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2021/07/nrs-issues-request-for-tenders-to-index.html).

Update: Thanks to Myko Clelland at FindmyPast for clarifying that the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands are indeed included, along with records enumerating UK soldiers based overseas.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 26 October 2021

Scotland 1750-1850 course starts next week on November 1st

A quick reminder that the next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parsh Registers course from Pharos Teaching and Tutoring Ltd (www.pharostutors.com) starts on Monday, November 1st, and runs for 5 weeks. This will be the last time that the course is offered at £49.99, as next year the price will rise to £58 (there has not been a price rise in a few years!).

The following is what to expect:

This is an intermediate level course in Scottish family history for those who are going back beyond 1850. You should have some experience with research in the Old Parochial Registers (OPRs) of the Church of Scotland and in using major websites for Scottish research. This course discusses sources that fill the gap when the OPRs are uninformative or missing; for example, records of parish and town administration, occupations, land transfer and taxation. Using these records involves several different locations. You will learn how to check online finding aids and how to find the most effective way to obtain records that may be available online or offline. This is the second course on Scottish research. If you have not previously taken the Scottish Research Online course please check its description.

Lesson Headings:

* Kirk Sessions records and parish poor
* Burgh records and town poor
* Occupations, taxation and early lists
* Land transfer and the value of sasines
* Land, inheritance and estates

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat session per week. (See How the Courses Work at https://www.pharostutors.com/howcourseswork.php.)

STUDENTS SAID: "well structured chats with opportunities for questions as well"

Relevant Countries: Scotland
Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 1 November 2021
Cost: £49.99

The following video also gives a bit more of a flavour about what to expect:


(Available also at https://youtu.be/1vX6GZtwZJ0)

For further details, and to sign up, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Who Owns Scotland?

A new BBC series has just started entitled Who Owns Scotland?, with the first episode currently available to view on the BBC iPlayer at https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/m00111y5/who-owns-scotland-series-1-episode-1 (UK access only).

Although a current affairs documentary touching on the history and politics of land reform, there is a lot for the family historian within this also, with the National Library of Scotland's Chris Fleet popping up, land reform campaigner and former MSP Andy Wightman, and also some discussion at Registers of Scotland, including commentary on the flaws within the Registers of Sasines in Scotland for identifying land in historic times, and the optimistic ambition for its modern equivalent, the Land Register, to replace it by 2025.

If interested in the topic, Andy Wightman's The Poor had No Lawyers: Who Owns Scotland and How They Got It is a definitive guide which I would recommend to any family historian to have in their personal library. The following is from a review of the book that I wrote in 2015:

Just now I am reading a remarkable book by Andy Wightman, entitled The Poor Had No Lawyers - Who Owns Scotland (And How They Got It). I have the new edition, published by Birlinn Ltd in 2013 (the original was produced in 2011), and the main reason I purchased it is the fact that land reform is fast becoming a political hot potato in Scotland. In a country of just over 5 million folk, half of the privately held land mass of Scotland is owned by just 432 people, a situation that has been virtually unchanged for centuries. In November 2004, Scottish feudalism was finally abolished, marking the end of a system that endured through most of Scotland since the 12th century. There is still a lot on the reform agenda to be addressed, and fast growing concensus appearing on what those changes should be on the one side by those who think the issue of land reform is unfinished business (which includes the Scottish Government), with an equally vociferous opposition from the landowners who still own vast estates across the country, and who want nothing but the status quo to endure. Whilst I took up the book to obtain more of a political education on the subject, in actual fact, this book is one that every Scottish based genealogist should also get stuck into.

Andy Wightman has long campaigned on the need for reform, but before laying out the political case for its need, he spends quite a bit of time looking at the historic background to the acquisition of land in the country. He kicks off with brilliant contempt for so-called Scottish independence heroes such as Robert the Bruce, calling him "a medieval warlord", who was "murderous, duplicitous, conniving and wholly devoid of any higher principles than his own advancement". From this point onwards, you know that he has no problem challenging the views of the establishment! But crucially, he then goes on to discuss how Scottish land was consolidated into the hands of a few landowners across the centuries in what he describes as a series of thefts.

There was the theft of common land by the Crown, which used feudalism to structure its management through royal prerogative (from 1503 James IV catalysed the process with an extensive programme to feu out Crown held lands). There was the theft of land from the Church before the Reformation, with many illegitimate offspring installed into corrupt bishoprics by the so called great and the good, from whom Church land passed into the hands of their 'noble' families. There was the support of the Lords of the Congregation at the Reformation of 1560 itself, not just for religious reasons, but to help finish off the job of securing the remaining Church lands - a process that actually caused problems for the new Kirk, as the assets it needed to finance its new programmes of education and discipline were squandered by the nation's nobles. There was then the subsequent successful effort of the nobility to formally legalise their possession of property seized from Church lands through the Registration Act and Proscription Act of 1617, with 'proscription' allowing ownership to be recognised for land that had been held for at least forty years. The book therefore explains the background to why devices such as the Registers of Sasines were actually created, and later why tailzies and other forms of documents that we use for family history research came into existence. Further land grabs are also recorded, such as those of the commonties and burgh commons.

There are great examples of how records developed across time also, including the development of Edinburgh New Town from 1766, and how feudal charters evolved as a consequence of its feuing plan. In older charters, burdens (conditions imposed by feudal superiors on vassals as to what they could do with land) were not detailed in the documents, but this caused problems with Edinburgh. Those who took the initial feus for the New Town agreed to design their buildings according to a plan, but the plans and conditions were not included in the charters - instead, the agreement was via contract law. When those original owners sold on their buildings, the new owners were not bound by the same contract, and as the charters did not list any obligations on what should be done with the properties in terms of their development, the new owners could do what they liked with their holdings. The addition of burdens in the charters from this point soon put paid to that. And so on.

The book obviously then goes into depth on the political consequences, and the author's beliefs on what still needs to be addressed, which you may or may not agree with. But if you like a little bit of politics, and at the same time have an interest in the records of Scotland used for genealogical research, Andy Wightman's book ticks many boxes, and is thoroughly recommended! 

It is available from Amazon at www.amazon.co.uk/Poor-Had-No-Lawyers-Scotland/dp/178027114X/.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 25 October 2021

Trackuback genealogy platform launches in Ireland

I've received a press release from a Swedish company called Trackuback (https://trackuback.com) which describes itself as "a platform for historical visualization, where you can experience your background in new ways. Your own family research connects to historical maps, archaeology, demography, to the large historical events and back to local history. Explore the context your ancestors lived in, and the places they inhabited. In short: Put yourself in the flow of history." The platform was originally launched in Scandinavia, and is now launching internationally, starting with Ireland. 

Here is the release:

Press release: Trackuback genealogy platform launches in Ireland

Trackuback is now launched in Ireland, with a premiere on 30 October. Ireland will be the fourth country in the international establishment, after the Scandinavian countries. We will continue during the autumn with launches in even more countries.

Trackuback is an innovative platform for genealogy and history, where the user visualizes personal genealogy with large amounts of built-in content, such as historical maps, statistics, archeology, demography and legends. The large historical events are reflected in the personal history, to create context and perspective. In short: Put yourself in the flow of history.

A campaign will be carried out in Ireland from 30 October, with a premiere discount of 30%. The platform contains tools that are not available in other genealogy platforms. Tools that we have made visual and intuitive to work with. We target early adopters, younger genealogists and the professionals who are looking for new tools for their commissions.

We wanted to create the platform that we ourselves lacked and started building Trackuback with support from the Swedish innovation agency Vinnova. The founders are enthusiasts from different areas of expertise, who came together in our interest for history and visualization. New tools and sources are constantly being added. We work closely with our users, and their wish lists guide the direction we take.

Trackuback is a startup company based in Sweden. In the development project, we collaborate with the well-known genealogist Ted Rosvall, known from "Who do you think you are?", and DNA expert Peter Sjölund. Wikimedia is another important partner.

Do not hesitate to contact us for more information. https://www.trackuback.com


Disclaimer - I have not tested this platform, and have not heard of the company before, so am just flagging it up for anyone who may be interested! 

 

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

NLS Maps Reading Room extends opening hours

From the National Library of Scotland maps team on Twitter (@natlibscotmaps):

From 1st November 2021, the Maps Reading Room will be open Monday-Thursday, 10-1 & 2-5, by appointment. Book your visit online https://www.nls.uk/using-the-library/reading-rooms/maps/appointments/ and reserve the maps you wish to consult auth.nls.uk/map-request/.

Until now it has been open Tuesdays-Thursday 10am-1pm and 2pm-4pm, so this is an addition of Mondays, and an extra hour in the afternoon. For more on the Edinburgh based maps department please visit https://maps.nls.uk.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Ulster Historical Foundation re-opens

From The Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com):

The Foundation is open again

We hope you and your families are keeping safe and staying well. What a long, strange 18 months we have experienced. We realise it is not over yet, but we hope the vaccines and ongoing improvements in treatments will continue to keep communities safe and allow us to resume some sort of ‘normal’ life.

We would like to thank everyone who continued to support the Foundation through the course of the pandemic from March 2020 till now, or who asked after the well-being of our staff and the organisation. Your care and support is very much appreciated.


End of furlough and resumption of service

As you will be aware most of the Foundation’s staff were furloughed due to the pandemic. With the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) closed for most of the past 18 months, or working under very severe restrictions, the Foundation was unable to undertake much of our work.

That said I am pleased to say that all our staff have now returned to work. The furlough scheme ended on 30 September and the Foundation has been open since 1 October 2021.


Hybrid working for staff

Just so you are aware, as with many organisations the staff have returned to work in a hybrid format: with some time spent working in the office, and some from home. We have taken this step to try to keep staff safe and to try to ensure the office is safe for visitors: with social distancing measures in place and other mechanisms – masks, sanitiser, screens – available, so that those who wish to visit us can do so.

Thus, while the numbers working in the office on any given day will be lower than before the pandemic, visitors are now welcome to call at the Foundation, Monday–Friday, 10:00am to 4:00pm.


Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI)

We are also pleased to report that the Record Office started to relax their restrictions for individual visitors in early September. Researchers still need to make an appointment in advance, but documents can now be ordered during the visit as per the system that operated before Covid. Moreover, further relaxations of the regulations are planned: individuals will be allowed to book up to two visits per week and more daily slots will be made available.

While group visits are still not permitted and PRONI is a long way from ‘business as usual’, the removal of the very tight restrictions does mark a major improvement in access to PRONI for users.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 24 October 2021

Recent additions to National Library of Scotland maps platform

It was great to hear Chris Fleet on Saturday's Scottish Indexes conference discussing future plans for the NLS maps platform (https://maps.nls.uk), with plans to have half a million images online by 2025, including a substantial amount of new out of copyright material for English and Welsh OS maps, and some European additions. 

In the meantime, the following are some of the recent additions to the ever growing site:

Scottish water mills website
This new web resource shows the locations and details of over 9,000 mills in Scotland in the 19th century. You can query and filter the mill records by name, mill type, date, and related features, as well as compare distributions of mills in a split-screen viewer. There is also supporting information about mills in Scotland, the project workflow to create the mills data, and how to download the mills data. The online resource was created during a six month placement by Iara Calton, an AHRC Collaborative Doctoral Partnership PhD student at the University of Glasgow.

OS Six-inch Scotland first edition - railway and other variant states (1840s-1880s)
We have added an additional 1,824 Ordnance Survey Six-inch to the mile, first edition maps of Scotland online (1840s-1880s). These are an earlier set of flat sheets to the initial set we have had online since 2008. In some cases these new sheets are useful for showing the variant states of these maps, including those which show railway additions, updates to towns, county boundary sheet changes, security deletions, administrative boundary changes, as well as related variant information in the map margins. Read further information about these new additions. In other cases, these maps have different annotations, marks or paper tone, which may be preferred as copies.

New guide - Maps for researching Scottish Woodland History
We have put together a new guide on Maps for researching Scottish Woodland History. Maps provide a wealth of information about woodland history, as well as on woodland archaeology, industry, management, and military use. This guide picks out the most useful maps for viewing and understanding trees and woodland, as well as changes in woodland cover over time. It looks at different definitions and types of woodland and how different map-makers represented woodland. The guide also includes links to downloadable datasets, details of resources that are not online, as well as references for further reading.

OS 25 inch 'blue-and-black' drawings, Scotland, 1890s-1940s
This set of 694 Ordnance Survey 'blue-and-black' drawings show revision for the 25 inch to the mile maps, between the 1890s and the 1940s. This revision process drew new edition information in black ink on a printing of the previous edition in light blue. When this was photographed, the blue would not reproduce, so details not required or no longer present on the ground appear in blue. Military and related sites were added in black, but some of these were subsequently erased from the final printed maps. We have scanned all sheets which include stamps by Ordnance Survey referring to deletions where these were required, as well as all sheets in the counties of Linlithgow and Nairn.

New guide - Maps for Researching House and Building History
Are you interested in looking into the history of a house or building? We have put together a new guide on Maps for Researching House and Building History which highlights some of the most relevant maps to use as documentary sources. The maps are arranged roughly chronologically, covering rural and urban areas, with links to the maps and further information about them on our webite. We also include information on recent buildings and map copyright, as well as further relevant resources, both online and in print.

For the relevant links and further detail, please visit the NLS maps Recent Additions page at https://maps.nls.uk/additions.html.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 23 October 2021

Sharing Shetland online conference - November 27th 2021

From Shetland Family History Society (www.shetland-fhs.org.uk):

We are pleased to announce that the Shetland FHS will be holding a free Virtual Conference on Saturday the 27th November (UK time). This will be on Zoom and hosted by Scottish Indexes.

We have three speakers lined up – Laughton Johnston talking about Shetland Captains 1850-19; Jon Sandison giving a guide to the Commonwealth War Graves in Shetland; and Professor Wendy Wickwire talking about James Teit, the renowned Shetland anthropologist. We are waiting confirmation of our fourth speaker, who will be announced in due course. We will finish with a live open question and answer session on Saturday evening (UK time).

The talks are being pre-recorded so that they will be available online enabling people in every time zone to see them over that weekend.

Registration is online and now open, you can do so by clicking here.The event is completely free but if anyone would like to help us offest the costs of hosting, a small donation can be made if you wish via the red "Donate" buttons on this website.

(With thanks to Emma and Graham at Scottish Indexes)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 22 October 2021

Help learn more about the origins of Scottish Gypsy/Travellers

If you have traveller connections in Scotland, this University of Edinburgh project may be of interest:

Help learn more about the origins of Scottish Gypsy/Travellers

People with at least two grandparents from the Traveller community are being asked to take part in a new genetic study, which aims to shed light on their origins.

The research will provide a unique opportunity to understand how Scottish Travellers relate to Irish Travellers, English Gypsies and Welsh Kale, as well as their settled neighbours. Some 400 people are being invited to join the study (from any of these communities), which will also seek to understand patterns of health – including any genetic risk factors  - in the Traveller communities.

Representatives of the community asked researchers at the University of Edinburgh to carry out the study, as there has been no genetic research involving Scottish Travellers.

Everyone who takes part in the University of Edinburgh study will complete an online questionnaire about their health and lifestyle. They will also be asked to return a saliva sample by post, which will be used for genetic analysis by researchers.

People who would like to take part can register their interest by visiting the study website: www.ed.ac.uk/travellergenes.

More details are available on the project webpage. https://www.ed.ac.uk/news/2021/study-seeks-to-better-understand-traveller-heritag

(Thanks to Ali MacDonald via the Scottish Genealogy Network)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 21 October 2021

Autumn family history courses from the NIFHS

The North of Ireland Family History Society (www.nifhs.org) is running a series of courses this autumn, as follows:

Fri 29 Oct – Raising The Dead
Mon 1 Nov – Life in Ulster in the 1830’s
Tue 16 Nov – Using WikiTree
Thu 18 Nov – Google Basics for Family History Research
Wed 1 Dec – NIFHS Look Up Service
Thu 2 Dec – Advanced Google Tools for Family History Research
Sat 4 Dec – Family Tree Maker
Tue 7 Dec – PRONI Online Records  

Classes will normally last for around 90 minutes – usually a one-hour talk followed by questions and answers. The Classes are not available as recordings after the presentation date.

• The Classes are £10 each, except for the “NIFHS Look Up Service” class which is free.
• By booking the two Google Classes (Basics & Advanced Tools) together the cost is £15, a saving of £5.
• A Course Notes Booklet is available for the “Life in Ulster in the 1830s” Class.  Select the £15 Class & Notes option.

For further details, please visit the NIFHS website at www.nifhs.org/courses/. NB: The brilliantly named Raising the Dead course is "our Halloween class about reconstructing the DNA of deceased people"!

(With thanks to Martin McDowell)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

AGRA creates bursary in memory of Scottish genealogist Dr. John Burt

From the Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (www.agra.org.uk) in England:

AGRA PRESS RELEASE: THE DR JOHN BURT BURSARY FOR AGRA ASSOCIATES

Dr John Burt was an Associate of AGRA, who made a great impact with his enthusiasm and willingness to get involved. His sudden death earlier this year came as a great shock to all his colleagues, who very much wished to find a way of remembering him and his contribution to AGRA and to genealogy. We are therefore pleased to announce that Council has decided to institute an annual bursary award of £250 in his memory. This is to be payable to an AGRA Associate progressing to full membership, and will go towards the expenses of furthering their genealogical education.

Antony Marr, AGRA Chair, said: “John made a tremendous contribution to both AGRA and the wider genealogy world. We are all saddened at his death.

“This bursary is a fitting tribute to John, providing a lasting legacy to his passion for furthering genealogical knowledge.”

Dr. John Burt, M.B., Ch.B., B.A., Cert. Archaeol., M.Sc., F.S.A.Scot., Q.G., was a retired general medical practitioner. Known as Jack by family and friends, he followed in his father's footsteps working for nearly 30 years as a local GP in Dunfermline, Fife, Scotland. Educated at Edinburgh Academy and obtaining his medical qualifications at the University of Aberdeen, John was a keen climber having reached the summit of all the Munros in Scotland and even gained a Blue Peter badge as a child.

He had a passion and huge knowledge of military medals which he had been collecting since childhood. Researching the men named on Fife War Memorials enabled him to give knowledgeable talks on the First World War – a war both of his grandfathers had fought in and survived.

John loved researching and learning and relished the challenge of tackling a new project. He published a book on Pictish stones in the 1990s which remains the only work of its kind to date.

Following his retirement from medical practice he gained an M.Sc. in Genealogy, Palaeography and Heraldry with the University of Strathclyde. Researching the case notes of individuals in Roxburgh District Asylum for his dissertation enabled him to write two books for genealogists and historians on mental health in nineteenth century Britain, which were published by Pen & Sword History: 'Lunatics, Imbeciles and Idiots: A History of Insanity in Nineteenth Century Britain and Ireland' (2017) and 'Madness, Murder and Mayhem: Criminal Insanity in Victorian and Edwardian Britain (2018).

John endeavoured to make a positive difference to the lives of others through his work and research and was well-loved and much respected by both the medical and genealogy communities. It is therefore fitting this bursary will go towards making a positive difference to genealogists. 

(With thanks to Jane Roberts)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 20 October 2021

Free Scottish genealogy talks for Get Online Week

I will be giving two talks this week for West Lothian Councils Museum Service (https://www.westlothian.gov.uk/article/44854/Museums), as part of Get Online Week

The talks, which are free to attend, are as follows:

Discover Your Scottish Ancestors
Thursday, October 21st 7.30pm-8.30pm
Booking Link:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/discover-your-scottish-ancestors-tickets-179981889677

"Here's tae us. Wha's like us? Damn few, an' they're a' deid!"

Although Scotland is currently part of Great Britain, its historic records and traditions are very different compared to the rest of the UK, with many institutions remaining independent from England at the time of the Union in 1707. These include the Presbyterian based state church, the legal system, the education system, and considerably more.

In this session, Ayrshire based family historian Chris Paton outlines some of the many records that can help you to explore your Scottish ancestry online. He'll discuss church records, civil registration records, censuses, land records, inheritances processes, and along the way flag up some of Scotland's more interesting historic traditions to help researchers better understand their ancestral heritage.  


Sharing Your Family History Online
Sunday October 24th 2pm-3pm
Booking Link:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/sharing-your-family-history-online-tickets-181034076797

For many enthusiasts pursuing their family history research, the online world offers a seemingly endless archive of digitised materials to help us answer the questions posed by our ancestors. In addition to hosting records, however, the internet also offers a unique platform on which we can host our research and lure in prospective cousins from around the world, to help build up a larger shared ancestral story.

In this session, Ayrshire based family historian Chris Paton explores the many ways in which we can present our research and encourage collaboration online. He will detail the many organisations and social media applications that can permit co-operation, describe the software platforms on which we can collate our stories, and illustrate the many ways in which we can publish our stories online. Along the way, he will also explore how we can make our research work further for us, by drawing in experts and distant cousins from around the world to help us break our ancestral brick walls. 

I hope to maybe see you there!

Chris

 
 

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 18 October 2021

Irish Lives Remembered Autumn 2021 issue now available

From Irish Lives Remembered magazine:

Welcome to the Autumn 2021 issue

This issue offers a wealth of articles on Irish lives, recent and distant, and a trove of genealogy tips to help you with your research.

Articles:

  • Fiona Fitzsimons – HSH Prince Albert II of Monaco makes a Major Donation to Trinity College Dublin to Honour Family Links with the College and with Ireland
  • Michael McShane and Catherine Kerr - The Re-Indexed 1821 Census for Cavan is Now Available at Cavantownlands.com
  • Maurice Gleeson – Testing Siblings Helps the WATO (“What Are The Odds”) Tool Hone in on Unknown Relationships
  • Robert Flanagan Stieglitz – Great-Great-Grandfather Thomas Flanagan, A New Yorker Carved in Stone: The Search for His Parents in Cloonfree, County Roscommon
  • Paul MacCotter and Eamonn O’Hanlon – The O’Hanlons of Orior (County Armagh)
  • Eamonn P. Kelly – The Goddess and the Horse-Eared King: Brigid and Labhraigh Loingseach – Ancestral Deities of the Leinstermen
  • Brigit McCone – The Spiritualized Internationalism of Annie Besant
  • Nathan Mannion – John Purroy Mitchel, the “Boy Mayor of New York”
  • Book Excerpt – Ancestral Journeys (2021) by Kevin Terry
  • The Genealogical Publishing Company Book Excerpt – The People of Cork 1600 – 1799 (2017) by David Dobson    


Regular columns:

  • Dear Genie (Our Genealogists help you with your research block)
  • Photodetective (Jayne Shrimpton analyses one of your family photos)
  • Patrick's Page (Patrick Roycroft deals with a client at the Irish Family History Centre)
  • FMP Roundup (Niall Cullen lets us know of the new Irish genealogy records that have been added to Findmypast)

The magazine can be read online at https://irishlivesremembered.ie/latest-edition/

 

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

ScotlandsPeople Centre resumes full day service

The ScotlandsPeople Centre (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/visit-us) in Edinburgh is resuming full day service from today, Monday 18th October, although places still need to be booked in advance. The Dundas Room will be open from 9am-4.30pm, Mondays to Fridays. On site copying and print services remain unavailable at this time.

For further details of the status of National Records of Scotland, visit https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/about-us/service-status.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 17 October 2021

National Records of Scotland offers a virtual New Register House tour

The National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) has a short video online offering a tour of New Register House in Edinburgh, the part of the NRS which houses the operation of the General Register Office for Scotland (the "well of souls"!). It is described as follows:

Take a look behind the scenes in National Records of Scotland’s New Register House, the first repository for Scotland’s register of vital events (births, deaths and marriages).


You can also access the video via YouTube at https://youtu.be/JamxP4GAA9w.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

1921 Scottish census article by Ken Nisbet

I have just read a short article by Ken Nisbet concerning the 1921 census in the SAFHS newsletter from March this year. Although the information on the release of the census has changed (it will now be released late 2022 at the earliest), you might be interested to have a read about what information you will find in the census when we eventually see it!

The article is available at https://www.safhs.org.uk/Documents/bulletin202103.pdf

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

ISBGFH Irish track recordings available to purchase until November 30th

A huge thanks to the International Society of British Genealogy and Family History (www.isbgfh.com) for its superb British Institute last week, in which I taught the Irish track from Monday to Friday, with four hours of tuition per day. I had 34 very keen students, and even managed to send FamilySearch's David Rencher down a rabbit hole at one point!!! It was a lot of fun to teach, and I hope it helps those who attended with their ongoing research efforts.

The recordings of these classes are still available to purchase through the ISBGFH until November 30th, if you were unable to attend the sessions last week. To do so, please contact Megan Heyl at InstituteDirectorISBGFH@gmail.com for details, and after invoicing you for the correct amount, they will then be sent to you upon payment. 

A reminder of the topics that were covered:

What is Ireland?
• Who are the Irish?
• Marking the Boundaries
• A Sense of Place

Church and State – Ireland's Vital Records
• Civil Registration
• Church Records
• Further denominations
• Other Resources

Irish Land Records – Part 1
• Where were they?
• Early valuation records
• Tithes Records
• Townland Valuation
• Primary Valuation of Ireland (Griffith's Valuation)
• Valuation revisions

Irish Land Records Part 2
• Tenancy & ownership
• Land registration – the Registry of Deeds
• Land registration – the Land Registry
• Irish Land Commission
• Probate Records

Irish Occupations
• Agricultural sector
• Military service
• Merchant Navy
• Skilled labour
• The Churches
• Professions
• Businesses

Daily Life in Ireland
• Newspapers
• Education
• Electoral records
• Times of Crisis
• Emigration
• Law and Order
• Case Study

Finding the Irish in Britain
• Britain and the Crown Dependencies
• British archives
• Civil registration
• Wills
• Poor law records and returns
• British censuses
• 1939 National Identity Register
• Newspapers
• Societies

DNA and Other Sources
• Published Resources
• Oral history projects
• Online biographical resources
• Cousin bait – put your research out there
• DNA
• DNA Case Studies

The Decade of Centenaries: Ireland 1912-23
• Background: Ireland and the United Kingdom
• Home Rule
• Women's suffrage
• Workers' rights: The Dublin Lockout 25 AUG 1913 -18 JAN 1914
• The First World War 1914-1918
• Ireland divided 1919-1923
• Beyond 2022

Case Study: An Irish Farm History
A case study pulling together many of the resources discussed this week, telling the history of a Kilkenny farmhouse and the family within.
Final questions.


In addition to my Irish track, there was a separate English track taught last week with Paul Milner, and additional Scottish and Welsh tracks running in this coming week. Recordings for these will also be on sale until November 30th. For further details on the full British Institute programme, please visit www.isbgfh.com/BRITISH-INSTITUTE.

Thanks again to Megan, Sylvia, and Pat Richley-Erickson's team for a superbly hosted event last week! 

NB: A quick plug also to say that I will be giving a talk to the ISBGFH on November 6th on the topic of Scottish Church and State Records - I hope to maybe see you there!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 16 October 2021

Scottish Indexes 13 conference takes place on Sat 23rd October

The next Scottish Indexes conference takes place on Saturday 23 October 2021. The following is a brief summary of what to expect, as outlined on the website at www.scottishindexes.com:

We will be welcoming back genealogist Chris Paton who will present ‘Tracing the Irish in Scotland’.

We are excited to introduce genealogist Eilir Daniels for the first time at the Scottish Indexes conferences. Eilir will present ‘Tracing Welsh Ancestry’.

We are also delighted to introduce Amelia Bennett, who will present, ‘Hidden in Plain Site’ - a journey through where to find genealogical records that are often not known about or forgotten in preference for the more commonly used websites.

Dr Louise Williams, archivist at Lothian Health Services Archive, will join us to share some of the gems from their archive. Lorna Steele will join us from the Highland Archive Service to share some of their amazing school records.

Chris Fleet will be joining us again from the National Library of Scotland. Their map collection is a priceless tool for genealogy research. Chis will help us get to grips with their website in his presentation ‘Using the NLS maps website for family history research’.

Genealogy Q & A hosted by Graham and Emma Maxwell. 

The conference is free to attend, either via Zoom or the company's Facebook group page at https://www.facebook.com/groups/scottishindexes.

For further details visit the Scottish Indexes site at www.scottishindexes.com - the day's schedule should be available in the next few days.

Hopefully see you there!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 15 October 2021

TheGenealogist adds Wexford Catholic parish records and Dublin probate books

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

TheGenealogist launches Irish records containing nearly a million individuals

TheGenealogist has just released records of baptisms, marriages and burials from Wexford Catholic Parish Records and new Dublin Will and Grant Books to provide a valuable resource for those researching Irish ancestry.

The Dublin wills are from the Deputy Keeper Of Ireland, Index To The Act or Grant Books, and To Original Wills, of The Diocese Of Dublin 1272 -1858 (26th, 30th, and 31st Report) and cover an area that is bigger than the current County of Dublin as the diocese included a sizeable part of County Wicklow, some substantial parts of southern and eastern County Kildare, as well as smaller portions of Counties Carlow, Laois (Queen’s County) and Wexford.

The Wexford Parish records, which are being released at the same time, have been newly transcribed by TheGenealogist and also benefit from their SmartSearch that enables subscribers to look for the parent’s potential marriage records from baptism records and also potential siblings. Each result also has a link to view the registers on the National Library of

Ireland’s website should the researcher wish to see an image of the actual page of the Catholic parish register.

This new release, now available to all Gold and Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist will be a useful resource for those researchers who wish to find out more about their Irish ancestors.

Read TheGenealogist’s article: George Harrison’s Wexford ancestors found in the Irish Parish Records https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2021/george-harrisons-wexford-ancestors-found-in-the-irish-parish-records-1473/

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 13 October 2021

MyHeritage updates Theory of Family Relativity matches

If you have tested your DNA through MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com), you may be interested to know that it has once again updated its Theory of Family Relativity matches.

As a result of this new update:

  • The total number of theories has increased 47.7%, from 39,845,078 to 58,866,331
  • The number of DNA Matches that include a theory increased 48.7%, from 27,130,989 to 40,335,252
  • The number of relationship paths increased 46%, from 312,222,662 to 456,091,094 (sometimes theories are found through multiple paths, and these provide additional supporting evidence of a relationship)
  • The number of MyHeritage users who now have at least one Theory of Family Relativity™ for their DNA Matches has increased by 22.2%

For furtehr details read the MyHeritage blog post on the development at https://blog.myheritage.com/2021/10/update-to-theory-of-family-relativity-19-million-new-theories-added/.

(With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 10 October 2021

Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Registers course starts Nov 1st

My next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Registers course run kicks off at the start of next month from November 1st 2021, for a further five week run. If you're looking for a way to learn a little bit more each week about your favourite subject, why not sign up?!  

Here's the description:

This is an intermediate level course in Scottish family history for those who are going back beyond 1850. You should have some experience with research in the Old Parochial Registers (OPRs) of the Church of Scotland and in using major websites for Scottish research. This course discusses sources that fill the gap when the OPRs are uninformative or missing; for example, records of parish and town administration, occupations, land transfer and taxation. Using these records involves several different locations. You will learn how to check online finding aids and how to find the most effective way to obtain records that may be available online or offline. This is the second course on Scottish research. If you have not previously taken the Scottish Research Online course please check its description.

Lesson Headings:

* Kirk Sessions records and parish poor
* Burgh records and town poor
* Occupations, taxation and early lists
* Land transfer and the value of sasines
* Land, inheritance and estates

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat session per week. (See How the Courses Work at https://www.pharostutors.com/howcourseswork.php.)

STUDENTS SAID: "well structured chats with opportunities for questions as well"

Relevant Countries: Scotland
Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 1 November 2021
Cost: £49.99

The following video also gives a bit more of a flavour about what to expect:



(Available also at https://youtu.be/1vX6GZtwZJ0)

For further details, and to sign up, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302.

Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Registers has been designed as a follow on course from the Scottish Research Online course, although it can certainly be signed up for if you already have the same level of knowledge as given from the earlier course.

And the second run of my new Progressing Your Irish Research Online course starts again on November 15th 2021 - further details at https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=260.

I'll hopefully see you online soon! 

NB: Please note that Pharos course prices will be increasing from November 1st, so if you want to save a wee bit, now might be the time to go for it!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 8 October 2021

Irish Genealogical Research Society website problems resolved

The Irish Genealogical Research Society (www.irishancestors.ie) has announced that its website, which has been experiencing some technical issues over the last few weeks and offering limited access, is now back online. 

Thankfully in time for the Irish track of the ISBGFH's British Institute, which I will be teaching next week (see http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2021/10/still-time-to-sign-up-for-isbgfh.html) - popping off now to quickly change the screengrab!

(With thanks to the IGRS at @IGRS_1936)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.