Saturday, 28 May 2022

TheGenealogist adds Dublin city 1851 census names

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

Search for Dublin Ancestors with the latest release from TheGenealogist

This week TheGenealogist is pleased to be releasing almost 60,000 records from the 1851 Dublin City Census Index. This new release will be a great aid for those researchers with ancestors who may have been living in Ireland’s Capital City on the 30 March 1851 at the time when the census was taken.

Researchers will find the Index to the 1851 Dublin census to be a wonderful tool for anyone searching for people in Dublin city in the mid-nineteenth century. It provides the names and addresses of approximately 59,000 heads of household and was compiled by Dr. D. A. Chart.

You can search over a million early Irish census records from 1821 to 1851. Also the only complete surviving censuses for Ireland that exist, 1901 and 1911 (over 8 Million records) can be searched via TheGenealogist’s unique search tools, allowing you to search for an ancestor using their address or keywords.

Earlier records compiled for 1813 to 1891 were destroyed at the government's request or by the civil war in 1922. This only leaves census substitutes for researchers of nineteenth century Ireland to use in their quest to delve into their family history.

Fortunately for Dublin Dr. D. A. Chart used the census to compile a “1851 Dublin Heads of Household Index” in 1915. At the time this was primarily to assist staff working in the Public Record Office of Ireland (PROI) searching for proof of age for applicants for the old-age pension.

This index survived the fire and is one of the few remaining fragments of census information available for that time.

TheGenealogist also has a number of Irish Trade and Residential Directories that can be useful for those researching their Dublin ancestors, as well as the previously released Dublin Will and Grant Books.

The 1851 Dublin City Census Index in this current release covers the parishes of
St. Andrew's, St. Anne's, St. Audeon's, St. Bridget's, St. Catherine's, St. George's, St. James's, St. John's, St. Luke's, St. Mark's, St. Mary's, St. Michael's, St. Michan's, St. Nicholas Within, St. Nicholas Without, St. Patrick's Deanery, St. Paul's, St. Peter's, St. Thomas's, St. Werburgh's and the civil parish of Grangegorman.

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

More than ten per cent of Scottish households have still to fill in census

Some 86% of households in Scotland have completed the 2022 census so far, with over two million having done so online, according to the National Records of Scotland. Due to the initial poor rate of returns by the end of April, the census deadline was extended until the end of this month, May 31st (see http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2022/04/scotland-2022-census-deadline-extended.html). 

Aberdeenshire has seen the highest rate of returns so far, at 91%, with Glasgow and West Dunbartonshire having the lowest rate.

For more on the story, visit https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-61614733.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 27 May 2022

MyHeritage offers free access to military records until May 31st

MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com) is offering free access to its military records until May 31st, as part of commemorations for the US Memorial Day. From the site:

MyHeritage is home to 694 collections of 74 million military records from all around the world — including draft, enlistment, and service records, pension records, and other military documents. Several important military record collections have been added in the past few months, including collections from France, Germany, and the United States. The collections contain records going back as far as the mid-1700s, providing information on people across the globe who were involved in the major armed conflicts of the past few centuries.

To access the records visit https://www.myheritage.com/research/catalog/category-3000/military.

(Source: https://www.myheritage.com/research/catalog/category-3000/military)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Ancestry adds Scotland, National War Memorial Index 1914-1945

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added the following third party index:

Web: Scotland, National War Memorial Index, 1914-1945
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/70908/
Original data: Edinburgh, Scotland: The Scottish National War Memorial (SNWM). "Roll Search." Accessed, 2022. "https://www.snwm.org/roll-search/.

General collection information

The Scottish National War Memorial collection includes names and details for people killed during the First and Second World Wars.

Using this collection

Information about each person may include:
First and last name
Military rank
Service number
Military awards and medals (decorations)
Birthplace
Date of death
Place of death
Cause of death
Unit name

If you only know that your ancestor served in the armed forces during one of the world wars, this database may provide details that shed light on their particular experience. Discovering your ancestor's military rank will provide insights into their role and the name of their unit can lead to unit histories that contain details of the battles in which they were involved.

Additional background details are available on the Ancestry collection page.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Forces War Records adds further medal rolls

Forces War Records (www.forces-war-records.co.uk) has added medal rolls from commemorative events at former royal pageant occasions:

The new collections available online on Forces War Records include*:

· King George V 1935 Silver Jubilee Medal Roll - Nominal rolls and category lists for the commemorative medal issued to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the coronation of King George V. The National Day of Celebration was held on the 6th May 1935 with a thanksgiving service held at St. Paul’s Cathedral. An approximate total of 85,235 medals were awarded.

· King George VI 1937 Coronation Medal Roll - Nominal rolls and category lists for the commemorative medal issued to celebrate the coronation of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth which took place on 12th May 1937 (with original digitised documents). An approximate total of 90,279 medals were awarded.

· Queen Elizabeth II 1953 Coronation Medal Roll - Nominal rolls and category lists for the commemorative medal issued to celebrate the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II on 2nd June 1953 and an approximate total of 138,214 medals were awarded.

· Queen Elizabeth II 1977 Silver Jubilee Medal Roll - Nominal rolls and category lists for the commemorative medal issued to celebrate the Silver Jubilee of Elizabeth II's accession to the throne on 6th February 1977 and an approximate total of 68,377 medals were awarded.

* A full access membership is required to view the records in the featured collection. See https://www.forces-war-records.co.uk/for full terms and conditions. 

Further details at the website.

(With thanks to Neil White)

 

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 26 May 2022

Scottish Genealogy Society library in Edinburgh closed until further notice

Yesterday I mentioned that there were issues with access to the Scottish Genealogy Society library in Edinburgh on Tuesday (http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2022/05/access-to-scottish-genealogy-society.html). 

The society has now posted the following update on its website at https://www.scotsgenealogy.com:

DUE TO UNFORESEEN CIRCUMSTANCES THE SOCIETY LIBRARY IS CLOSED UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

We apologise to members & the public for the inconvenience .

Please check the website for updates.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

National Records of Scotland creaks slowly back towards normality

There's been an update from the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) about its plans to return to some kind of normal, outlined at https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/about-us/service-status. The following is the key part: 

We recognise the demand for access to our Historical Search room and active planning is underway to return historical search room services to their original location. This move will present opportunities to increase capacity and the ability to add additional aspects of service delivery. This move is likely to take place during June 2022 and a specific date will be communicated to customers on the NRS website, when that information is available.

This is 'likely' to happen in June, but it is not confirmed yet. And so it drags on...

Probably the most telling line though is this:

We have experienced significant and unique challenges due to the requirement for good ventilation in our category A listed buildings. 

The NRS has some fantastic archivists and registrars, and it's ScotlandsPeople website has been a game changer for many within the family history world. But there is a difference between having a Category A listed building and a Category A archive service provision. The poor ventilation of the building is the reason cited that the public has not been able to gain access - surely somewhere the penny must have dropped by now that the building is clearly not fit for purpose? 

Over the last two years I have been fortunate to have been able to concentrate on other areas of work to keep me going, rather than be held hostage to the inadequacies of the NRS provision, but many folk have had livelihoods severely disrupted by their inability to gain acess, within the family history world, the historical and academic world, and from other requirements - not least of which being just general access for the public to their own national archive. 

When the ScotlandsPeople Centre service area was initially re-opened, it was on the basis that professional genealogists only could use it, and not the general public. With the re-opening of the NRS search room, there have again been limitations on who could use it and when. Even the Information Commissioner has taken the NRS to task (https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2022/03/the-nrs-was-wrong-to-deny-access-to.html). I have no doubt that some good folk have been trying to do their best with all of this, but such search room feudalism stems from having a physical facility that is simply not up to the task. 

In 2019, some BMD registers were damaged because of flooding at the facility (see https://britishgenes.blogspot.com/2019/07/shock-as-national-records-of-scotland.html). A few years before this, in 2015, the NRS announced an Estates Review (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.com/2015/01/national-records-of-scotland-estates.html). I was contacted by the NRS at this point and was advised of the following:

"Our long-term aspiration is to co-locate the majority of our staff in a fit-for-purpose facility in Edinburgh, and to expand and improve our archive and public facilities at Thomas Thomson House in the west of the city. Although there are no immediate plans for NRS to move out of General Register House or New Register House, these buildings do not feature in our core estate over the long-term. This intention remains subject to a number of challenges and constraints, not least funding, and at this stage this is our preferred direction of travel over the long-term, not a hard and fast commitment."

As researchers, from various communities, we require access to the documents that we need for our research - we don't travel to archives to enjoy the pretty buildings. If the last two years have shown anything, it has shown that it is time for a 21st century archive in Scotland, as enjoyed in London by TNA and in Belfast by PRONI. 

If no-one is listening - and if the return to normal simply means that we are going to be right back to where we were before the pandemic - perhaps a few more holes could be knocked into the building to let some more air in. 

And preferably before the next pandemic hits...

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 25 May 2022

Access to Scottish Genealogy Society

I've been contacted by a reader to say that he was unable to visit the Scottish Genealogy Society library yesterday (Tuesday), as an unexpected issue emerged which apparently prevented visitors from being allowed in. 

Hopefully it may be a temporary issue, but if planning a visit to the library - which is well worth a visit! - it may be worth contacting them in advance first to double check that you can gain access. (The facility is currently advertising that it is open on Mondays, Tuesday and Thursday.)

Indeed, this is a piece of advice I would give for visits to all archival repositories!

The society's contact details are available at https://www.scotsgenealogy.com.


Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

FamilySearch adds UK Prisoners of War 1715-1947 collection

FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org) has added the following collections:

Prisoners of War, 1715-1947
https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/4459223

Comprised of various records held by The National Archives (England) detailing refugees and individuals taken as prisoners of war during major conflicts around the globe. The records contain the names of military personnel, civilians, diplomats, missionaries, and merchant seamen from nations all over the world.

Images are only available to FamilySearch members, their family history centres, their affilates, or at the National Archives in England (which holds the originals).

From the FamilySearch wiki entry at https://www.familysearch.org/en/wiki/Prisoners_of_War_-_FamilySearch_Historical_Records

Conflicts include:

  • Napoleonic Wars, 1747-1889
  • Crimean and Boer Wars, 1795-1951
  • World War I, 1913-1918

Sources:

  • ADM 1, Admiralty, and Ministry of Defence, Navy Department: Correspondence and Papers
  • AIR 1, Air Ministry: Air Historical Branch: Papers (Series I)
  • BT 167 Registry of Shipping and Seamen: Precedent Books, Establishment Papers, etc.
  • CAB 45, Committee of Imperial Defence, Historical Branch and Cabinet Office, Historical Section: Official War Histories Correspondence and Papers
  • CO 693, Colonial Office: Dominions (War of 1914-1918), Prisoners Original Correspondence
  • FO 372, Foreign Office: Treaty Department and successors: General Correspondence from 1906
  • FO 383, Foreign Office: Prisoners of War and Aliens Department: General Correspondence from 1906
  • MT 9, Board of Trade and Ministry of Transport and successors: Marine, Harbours and Wrecks (M, H and W Series) Files
  • WO 161, War Office: Miscellaneous Unregistered Papers, First World War
  • WO 900, War Office: Specimens of Series of Documents Destroyed

 

Comment: Unfortunately, this is not an easy collection to use, as FamilySearch's default search fields are largely incompatible with the data fields presented in the returns. It looks like you can only search by name and date - and in most cases that I have seen so far, it seems to be the initial returned for a first name only.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 24 May 2022

Monaghan records added to RootsIreland

Just added to RootsIreland (www.RootsIreland.ie): 

New Monaghan Records added 

We are delighted to announce the addition of 12,846 new Monaghan census substitute records to our database at Roots Ireland! They are as follows: 

Poor List Ellis Bequest (1803) 100 records
Poor List Currin (1811-52) 2208 records 
Poor List Mrs Leslie's (1822-36) 2269 records 
Poor List Ematris (1830-50) 2828 records 
Poor List Trough Relief Fund (1846) 343 records 
Poor List Trough Relief Fund (1847) 3576 records 
Poor List Clontibret (1847-64) 1522 records 

These poor lists note those in receipt of charity at various dates in County Monaghan, including during the Great Famine. 

Chris 

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 21 May 2022

More Valuation Records on ScotlandsPeople than expected

I've been doing some further research today into a two times great grandfather, a tailor called John Brownlie MacFarlane, who was based in Nairn and Inverness in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In addition to his bankruptcy in the 1870s, which I have previously researched, and additional court cases flagged up in the press (which he won!) I have also discovered a couple of newspaper articles suggesting that a J. B. MacFarlane of Inverness had taken up the role of precentor at the United Presbyterian Church in Nairn in 1870, perhaps a role he sought knowing that he was about to move to Nairn to set up his own business. My assumption is that it is almost certainly the same person, but as an assumption is never just good enough, I thought I would take a look at whether there was more than one "J. B. MacFarlane" in either Inverness or Nairn at the time to see if there might be other candidates. 

One way to potentially check this was to see who was in Nairn in 1875 using the Valuation Rolls, which are available on ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk). The records note the names of tenants/vassals, landlords/superiors, and the value of annual rent etc. In so doing, I have found that there seems to be quite a few more records available than have been previously advertised.

The ScotlandsPeople guide on Valuation Rolls (https://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/guides/valuation-rolls) notes this - "Indexes and images of valuation rolls for 1855, 1865, 1875, 1885, 1895,  1905, 1915, 1920, 1925, 1930, 1935 and 1940 are available to search on  this site." You have the option on site of selecting each year to carry out such searches; a record costs 2 credits to purchase.

I had previously consulted the relevant records on site in Edinburgh at the NRS (they have all been digitised from 1855-1958, but not all indexed), but have just been surprised to work out that considerably more of the records for John are now available online than was expected, as follows:

Search '1875' Nairn Burgh:
1870 – 14 High Street
1870 – 12 Rose Street
1871 – 81 High Street
1873 – 81 High Street
1874 – 81 High Street
1875 – 81 High Street

Search '1885' Nairn Burgh:
1877 – 81 High Street
1878 – 7 Bridge Street
1879 – 7 Bridge Street
1880 – 6 Church Street
1881 – 6 Church Street
1882 – 6 Sydney Place
1883 – 6 Sydney Place
1884 – 4 Sydney Place

Search '1895' Inverness Burgh:
1886 – 2 Hill Place
1891 – 2 Hill Place
1892 – 2 Hill Place
1893 – 2 Hill Place
1894 – 2 Hill Place
1895 – 2 Hill Place

Search '1905' Inverness Burgh:
1905 – 8 View Place

The NRS guide at https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/research/guides/valuation-rolls/problems-using-valuation-rolls states the same converage as the ScotlandsPeople guide, but notes "Indexes for further years will follow."  

I don't know how much wider the coverage is than has been advertised, but if you have used the records before, it might be worth a wee look to see if there is more there than you have previously found! (And I would be keen to learn what other coverage you might come across, if you would be good enough to share in the comments!)

Good hunting!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 20 May 2022

Two more Edinburgh City Archives collections added to Ancestry

Two more Edinburgh based collections have joined Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk), as sourced from Edinburgh City Archives (https://www.edinburgh.gov.uk/archives/edinburgh-city-archives-1/3):

Edinburgh, Scotland, Lord Provost Passports, 1845-1916
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/62350/

About Edinburgh, Scotland, Lord Provost Passports, 1845-1916

This collection contains registries of passports from Edinburgh, Scotland between the years of 1845 and 1916. All records are handwritten in English.

Passports from Scotland before 1916 are rare and mostly associated with the business owners or those wealthy enough to travel abroad.

Using this collection

Records in the collection may include the following information:
Person's name
Residence
Date of residence
Spouse's name
Names of next of kin
Relationships to next of kin
Destination

If you are searching for family members who emigrated permanently, you might not find them in this collection. During this time passports were primarily used as letters of reference or for identification purposes. Emigrants traveling one-way would require different types of permissions.


Edinburgh, Scotland, Alien Registers, 1794, 1798-1825
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/62348/

About Edinburgh, Scotland, Alien Registers, 1794, 1798-1825

General collection information

This collection contains registries of aliens living in Edinburgh, Scotland from 1794 up to and including 1825 and contains handwritten declarations made by aliens to a magistrate. Most records are handwritten in English, however the preprinted forms are bilingual; typed in both English and French.

Using this collection

Records in the collection may include the following information:
Person's name
Any known aliases
Age
Occupation
Birthplace
Date of residence
Statements of intent

Registries made on pre-printed forms are more standardised and will usually contain more information, including the addition of residents' current address and their port of entry into Great Britain.

While these records are associated with French migrants, the collection is not limited to people of French heritage. It was compulsory for aliens of all ethnicities to register.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Latest Scottish additions to the British Newspaper Archive as it hits 53 million pages

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) is about to hit 53 million pages, with 52,993,678 pages currently available as I type this.

The following Scottish content has been added over the last 30 days (no Irish content added that I can see this month, sorry!):

Stirling Observer
1612 pages, 1994

Irvine Herald
8198 pages, 1990, 1992

East Kilbride World
722 pages, 1991

Rutherglen Reformer and Cambuslang Journal
88 pages, 1885

Ayrshire Post
16426 pages, 1988-1989, 1991-1992

Strathearn Herald
1982 pages, 1989, 1991-1992

Paisley Daily Express
22605 pages, 1994-1997

East Kilbride News
2928 pages, 1991

Glasgow Chronicle
416 pages, 1849

Evening Times 1825
184 pages, 1825-1826

West Lothian Courier
13963 pages, 1873, 1876, 1879, 1882, 1885, 1888, 1890-1891, 1986, 1988, 1990-1992

Galloway News and Kirkcudbrightshire Advertiser
2021 pages, 1986

Daily Record
56580 pages, 1986-1987, 1993, 1995

Weekly Free Press and Aberdeen Herald
888 pages, 1876, 1882, 1886

Airdrie & Coatbridge Advertiser
3016 pages, 1993

Hamilton Advertiser
5221 pages, 1876, 1879, 1882, 1884-1888, 1910-1913, 1919-1920

Aberdeen Herald
368 pages, 1876

Kilmarnock Standard
4938 pages, 1993

Blairgowrie Advertiser
724 pages, 1991

Edinburgh Evening News
7450 pages, 1927, 1930

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Recently re-opened resources in Fife

Those of you with Fife ancestry may be interested to note two recent re-openings:

Fife Family History Society

We are now open by APPOINTMENT ONLY in Cupar Library. You are welcome to book a morning slot from 10.15am-12.15pm or an afternoon slot from 1.30pm-2.45pm on a FRIDAY or SATURDAY only for the moment. Please email:enquiries@fifefhs.org FREE access to Ancestry, use of our resources and reference materials to help you with your Fife ancestors. 

For more on Fife FHS visit https://fifefhs.org


Fife Archives

Visit the Archive Search room at OnFife Collections Centre, Bankhead.

Visits are by appointment only and visits are limited to 1.5 hours. You can make a booking by email to archive.enquiries@onfife.com

To access the archives you have to register with one form of photographic ID along with something with your address such as a utility bill.

Further details are available at https://www.onfife.com/libraries-archives/archives/your-visit/.

(With thanks to Ali Murray via the Scottish Genealogy Network)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 16 May 2022

Ancestry releases First World War Women's Royal Navy Service records

Now on Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk):

UK, Women’s Royal Naval Officers' Service Records, 1917-1919
https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/62354/

About UK, Women’s Royal Naval Officers' Service Records, 1917-1919

This collection contains records for those who served in the Women's Royal Navy Service (WRNS) from 1917-1920. Most records are handwritten in English on pre-printed forms. Types of records in this collection may include:
Application forms
Enrollment forms
Certificates of identification
Officer's forms

Using this collection

Records in the collection may include the following information:
Name, including maiden name if married
Rank
Birthplace
Birth date
Age
Date and place of enlistment
Date and place of discharge
Nationality
Residence
Marital status
Physical description
Regiment
Unit
Names of family members
Relationships to next of kin
Addresses of next of kin


There's also a bit on the set-up of the WRNS:

The Women's Royal Navy Service was created in 1917 in order to reserve men for seafaring roles. Members of the WRNS (affectionately called "the Wrens") were instead employed in a variety of non-combat roles to aid the war effort. Initial support roles available to the WRNS were primarily domestic (such as cooking and cleaning), but WRNS also served as clerks, telegraphists, mechanics, electricians, weapons analysts, and radar plotters.

The Wrens were disbanded in 1919 after the end of the First World War. Over 5,000 women were Wrens during the course of the war, which was particularly remarkable as the initial recruitment goal was only 3,000 women. The WRNS was reformed in 1939 to aid the British effort during the Second World War. The WRNS would fully disband in 1993 when women were integrated into the Royal Navy.


Chris 

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 13 May 2022

FIBIS seeks volunteer journal editor

From the Families in British India Society (FIBIS):

Volunteer Journal Editor needed

FIBIS are currently in need of a volunteer Journal Editor. Please read the job description below and contact FIBIS Chairman Pat Scully (email: chairman@fibis.org) if you are interested in the position or have any questions.

Job description - General Information

The primary role of the FIBIS Editor is to put together the Bi-annual Journal.

The FIBIS Journal is primarily an educational and historical publication to inform and entertain members interested in family history and life in India in the days of the Raj. It is published twice per year, so the work associated with its editing can be spread out as required, to suit the editor ‘s own availability or, if preferred, can be a concentrated effort taking place over a week or so. The work is eminently suitable for flexible working. Moreover, it is very interesting and varied work, where the Editor is in the fortunate position of learning whilst working, constantly being updated by reading the first-hand research and experiences of other people with similar interests and objectives. The role is well-supported by other FIBIS members who are always helpful and willing to lend a hand, contribute knowledge and expertise and generally are ready to step in wherever required.

Being Editor of the FIBIS Journal is a responsible position, but one is not alone. There is a strong team ethos behind the organisation and help is always available when needed.

Specific Tasks

  • To receive, select and edit articles contributed for the journal.
  • To proof-read the short-listed articles/material and edit where appropriate.
  • To format the Journal, arranging articles in a coherent and interesting form and update the information regularly contained (positions held by Trustees etc. usually on an annual basis)
  • To liaise with the Printing company and the proof-reader, so that the material contained in the Journal is correct and ready to be printed according to an agreed timetable.
  • To send out complimentary copies of the Journal (a list is provided). Members ‘ copies, which form the bulk of the mailings, are sent out by the Printer.
  • In order to perform the role successfully, a good level of I.T. and literacy skills is required.


Status

The Editor normally becomes a Trustee of the FIBIS charity, but doesn’t have to be. If applicants are interested in also taking on the trustee responsibilities they will need to attend Trustees ‘ meetings every two months, held at the British Library or via Zoom.  


(With thanks to FIBIS by email)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 11 May 2022

Inverness seeks to create Gaelic language cultural centre

The Gaelic language (Gàidhlig) in Scotland is undergoing something of a mini-renaissance of interest just now, thanks to the groundbreaking Scottish Gaelic course on Duolingo (www.duolingo.com), and the BBC's new Speak Gaelic series and course (https://speakgaelic.scot). Spoken historically all over Scotland, and to this day in much of the Western Isles and the Highlands, one of the biggest challenges that learners face is the opportunity to practice talking in the newly acquired language.

A new initiative in Inverness is fundraising to build Scotland's first 'culturlann', a thriving community hub with Gaelic at its heart. From the crowdfunder site:

Help us create a modern and vibrant Gaelic Cultural Centre where fluent speakers, learners and visitors of all ages can meet and enjoy the  language and culture.

Our aim is to create a space, with the Gaelic language at its heart, which will showcase and celebrate our culture .

    A welcoming Café with Gaelic speaking staff.
    A retail area selling Gaelic books, cards, CDs, t-shirts and many other Gaelic related gifts.
    An exhibition space promoting understanding of the history of the language
    Meeting rooms for Gaelic learning activities.
    A venue for Ceilidhs, concerts, family events, story-telling and other public events.

There is a higher percentage of Gaelic speakers in Inverness than any other city in Scotland and therefore, in the world ! We have a very successful Gaelic medium school full of children bursting with talent!

And yet. . . there is nowhere in the city where Gaelic speakers and learners can hear and use the language in a natural day-to-day environment and nowhere for visitors to find out more or experience an authentic Gaelic welcome.

With YOUR help, Cultarlann Inbhir Nis aims to change that!

Please donate if you would like to help make this happen!

A short video about the project is available at https://youtu.be/E5YEUxIyprA, and presented below for convenience:


The initiative is based on successful schemes that have been up and running for a while over the water in Northern Ireland, with regards to the local flavour of Gaelic there, Gaeilge, such as Cultúrlann McAdam Ó Fiaich in Belfast, and Cultúrlann Aonach Mhatha in Armagh. As a student in the 1990s I actually filmed a project at the Belfast based centre, which even had a secondary school based on site, and was blown away by what it had been able to achieve. To see something similar for Inverness would be an absolute dream come true, and yet another reason to visit!

If your ancestry includes a Gaelic component, or if you're a Gael today, old or new, please consider giving your support to this amazing project to help revitalise one of Scotland's longest establish languages. You can read more about the project, and make a donation, at https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/p/cultarlann.  

Gura math theid leibh to the team!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Northern Irish births, marriages and deaths can now be registered in Irish

A significant development that I missed a few weeks ago in March is a new change of the law in Northern Ireland, which now allows births, marriages, civil partnerships and deaths (and other processes such as stillbirths registrations and conversions from civil partnerships to mariages and vice versa) to be registered in the Irish language (Gaeilge). 

For more on the story visit the Northern Irish Department of Finance site at https://www.finance-ni.gov.uk/news/births-marriages-civil-partnerships-and-deaths-can-now-be-registered-irish-murphy.

Comment: Hopefully at some point a similar provision might be introduced for registration in Scotland in Gàidhlig!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 10 May 2022

Shane Wilson launches 1830 Valuation of Dublin City beta site

One of the most useful research resources for Irish genealogy research is Shane Wilson's site at www.swilson.info, which carries many finding aids and conversion tools. 

Shane has now added a wonderful new resource, the 1830 Valuation of Dublin City, in beta format, which allows you to search for residents by parish and street name. As it is in beta format, there are no finding aids available just yet, but it's a good job, and if you have Dublin ancestors from this period, as I do, you should hopefully have some fun with this!

The beta site is available at swilson.info/dubcval1830.php

(With thanks to Shane @Shanew147 via #AncestryHour)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

The Family Histories Podcast - Trapped

The second episode of the third series of The Family Histories Podcast has just been released, with yours truly as the subject. Here's a bit of background from the website:

In this second episode of Series Three – The Trapped – Andrew meets professional genealogist, genealogy tutor, and author Chris Paton. Andrew will be finding out how Chris became interested in tracing his family tree, how researching in Scotland, Ireland, and Northern Ireland can vary, and he’ll be asking him about his work with genealogy course provider Pharos, and his former television career working on history programmes with the BBC.

To listen to the episode, visit https://familyhistoriespodcast.com/2022/05/10/s03ep02-the-trapped-with-chris-paton/.

Previous editions can be heard at https://familyhistoriespodcast.com.

(With thanks to Andrew Martin)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

 

 

Sunday, 8 May 2022

Irish Military Archives website currently down

The Republic of Ireland's Military Archives website at militaryireland.ie is currently down, and according to my Pharos students, has been for about three days. 

Hopefully this is a temporary glitch, and that service will be resumed normally. 

In the meantime, the 1922 National Army census, hosted on the site, can also be searched on both Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) and FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk).


Update: As of Monday 9th May, that's the site back up again at https://www.militaryarchives.ie/en/home/.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 6 May 2022

Who Do You Think You Are? returns on May 26th

The nineteenth series of Who Do You Think You Are? commences as a limited run on BBC1 from May 26th. 

The series will include the following subjects:

  • Sue Perkins
  • Richard Osman
  • Matt Lucas
  • Anna Maxwell Martin
  • Ralf Little

For further details visit https://www.family-tree.co.uk/news/who-do-you-think-you-are-2022-celebrities-revealed/

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

New Westmeath records added to RootsIreland

RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.ie) has added the followng records:

New Westmeath Records added

We are delighted to announce the addition of 3,600 new Westmeath burial and marriage records to our database at Roots Ireland. They are as follows:
Burials

    Clonfad & Fransciscan Abbey - 483 records
    Portshanaghan Churchyard - 23 records
    Ballyloughloe Churchyard - 40 records
    Bunowen - 7 records
    Killua - 19 records
    St Johns Churchyard Clonmellon - 32 records
    Castletown Geoghegan - 40 records
    Clonarney - 105 records
    Lacken - 97 records
    Knockmant - 12 records
    Scarden - 25 records
    Kilcolumb - 139 records
    Clonlost - 26 records
    Griffinstown - 18 records
    Miscellaneous - 1,913 records

Marriages

    Mountnugent Marriages - 227 additional records

For the full list of burials, go to rootsireland.ie/westmeath and login or subscribe as required.

Yours Sincerely
rootsireland.ie 

(With thanks to RootsIreland via email)


Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 5 May 2022

Ancestry's 1950 US Federal Census nationwide searchable index

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has a nationwide index to the recently released US 1950 Federal Census now up and runnning, using software to interpret handwriting to speed up the process of indexing it. You can search the census at https://www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/62308/.

Using the site I have just located my wife's uncle and cousins in Masschussetts, within seconds of commencing the search, so I'm a happy bunny!

From the site:

Thanks to our proprietary handwriitng recognition technology, all 1950 U.S. Census records are now searchable. Transcription accuracy is dependent upon the quality of the document being scanned. For best results, view the census image.

You'll find more about the handwriting software used to decode the census at https://www.ancestry.co.uk/corporate/blog/ancestry-apply-handwriting-recognition-artificial-intelligence-create-searchable-index-1950-us

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Belfast City Council's burial records site redesign

Belfast City Council has redesigned its burial site interface, and given it a new address at https://online.belfastcity.gov.uk/burialsearch/BurialSearch.aspx. The site includes searchable burial records transcriptions for the City Cemetery, Roselawn Cemetery and Dundonald Cemetery. Searches are free, but for records older than 75 years you can purchase the actual burial records for £1.50, which often includes more details than a death certificate.

I'll be honest, I'm of the school that thinks if it isn't broken, don't fix it! This new version does seem to have enlarged everything, there seems to be a bit more navigation required to move around it, but the core functionality is still the same, which is the key thing. (I'm assuming they are going for the tablet crowd, the page is a lot more vertical!)

Happy hunting!

(With thanks to Allie Nickell @alliethinks via Twitter)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Registers course - spaces still available!

Just a reminder that the next Scotland 1750-1850: Beyond the Old Parish Registers course from Pharos Tutors (www.pharostutors.com), taught by yours truly, starts on Monday 9th, and there are still spaces available!

The course covers the following areas within its five lessons:

    * Kirk Sessions records and parish poor
    * Burgh records and town poor
    * Occupations, taxation and early lists
    * Land transfer and the value of sasines
    * Land, inheritance and estates

For further details, please visit https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=302. You will find a link to a short video introduction there also.

I hope to maybe see you there!

 

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Review - David Dobson's Scots-Irish Links: Consolidated Edition

For almost four decades, Scots based genealogist David Dobson has been valiantly plundering the archives to create finding aids for names of individuals from various Scottish linked communities, all dutifully published by the Genealogical Publishing Company (https://genealogical.com) for Clearfield Company in the US. These range from lists of Scottish emigrants and Scots banished to the American plantations, to lists of settlers in specific areas, such as Inverness in Scotland to the Carolinas in the US, or to early settlers in the American colonies.  

One community in particular that David has been meticulously documenting since 1994 has been the Scots who travelled to Ireland to permanently settle, or who moved back and forth across the Sheuch between Ireland and Scotland. Often referred to today as the 'Ulster Scots', or in the US as the 'Scotch-Irish', it is a sometimes simplistic narrative that states that these Scots settled in Ireland just prior to and during the Plantations of the early 1600s, and then moved on to the American colonies as a result of the discrimination imposed upon them through the Penal Laws, or through the desire for economic opportunities overseas. Many of these earlier Ulster Scots were Scots who went to Ulster during the Plantations (and beyond in Ireland), who died there or who returned fairly soon after to Scotland, as a consequence of the troubles of the 1640s, and through subsequent religious persecution. But there were several other waves of emigration to Ireland from Scotland to replenish their numbers, with many choosing to settle there after the Williamite Wars concluded in the late 17th century, into the period of Ireland's membership of the UK, and beyond the point of the island's Partition in 1921. Many of their descendants moved on from Ulster and Ireland, some regularly travelled and traded between Scotland and Ireland, whilst others even returned to live in Scotland (this reviewer being just one such Ulster Scot and equally proud Irishman!).

The point is that there were a lot of them, forming many different communities wherever and whenever they settled, whether in Ireland or the US, or even returning to Scotland and playing a part back there, and David has been on their trail for a long time. Through a series of publications entitled Scots-Irish Links, he has meticulously plundered the national repositories in Scotland, Ireland and England, universities and more localised archival holdings, as well as published secondary sources, to produce definitive lists in alphabetical order of those he has found, noting their names, brief descriptions of who they were, and where to find the original documents describing them. It's a Herculean effort that has been nothing short of heroic.

The main problem with these publications, if there ever was one, is that there were a fair few of them! Some libraries may hold a few copies, some may even be available online, but a complete collection has not always been an easy thing to find – until now. This new Scots-Irish Links Consolidated Edition covering the period from 1575-1825 is an absolute beast of a thing, comprised of two heavy volumes, each with over 900 pages, providing a faithful facsimile reproduction of all the relevant editions within a single genealogical gem. Most handily, each volume has a new general index to all of the editions hosted within (compiled by Jana Broglin), making it a much easier job to find the names that may be of interest for your research. As if that was enough, just for good measure, the author has also produced additional and unique content specifically for this edition, making it therefore the definitive and complete version (at least for now!). This update is comprised of Scots-Irish Links 1825-1900 Part 2, and Addendum to Scots-Irish Links 1725-1825, adding about a fifth of the second volume's content.

The following is how each volume is broken down:

Volume 1: Scots-Irish Links 1575-1725, Parts 1-8  (936 pages)

Volume 2: Scots-Irish Links 1575-1725, Parts 9-11; Later Scots-Irish Links 1725-1825, Parts 1-3; Scots-Irish Links 1825-1900, parts 1-2; Addendum to Later Scots-Irish Links 1725-1825  (910 pages)
 

The following are some typical entries that can be found:

GRAHAM, THOMAS, was granted Irish denization on 12 February 1618 [IPR]

WYLIE, JOHN, a Merchant of Belfast, was admitted as a burgess and guilds-brother in Ayr on 9 April 1718 [ABR]

MCCUTCHEON, WILLIAM, master of the bark Friends Adventure of Belfast, trading between Irvine and Belfast, 1686, and of the William and Jean of Belfast, a bark, trading between Irvine and Belfast, 1688 [NAS.E72.12.13/15]

(IPR = Irish Patent Roll; ABR = Ayr Burgess Roll; NAS = National Archives of Scotland, now the NRS)



I can see this being immensely useful for those carrying out research between Scotland and Ireland, and have already discovered some new leads into my own ancestral research of the Montgomery family of the small County Antrim town of Larne in the mid-18th century. I had previously established from research at PRONI that a John Montgomery from Larne was involved in shipping passengers to the American colonies in the 1770s, in partnership with a Malcolm McNeill in the town, but from David's books I have now found entries from Scottish records of two other ship-owning members of the Montgomery family from Larne in the previous decade, a William and Robert, who will undoubtedly be related. And that is just the first surname I have looked up – there's a fair few more to get stuck into.
 
If you're interested in Scottish history, Irish history, or Scotch-Irish history, this epic set is an absolute essential for your genealogical library. The books can be purchased individually at US$90 each from the Genealogical Publishing Company, or as a set for US$165 at https://genealogical.com/store/scots-irish-links-1525-1825-consolidated-edition-in-two-volumes/. Very highly recommended.

(With thanks to Joe Garozik at the Genealogical Publishing Company for the review copy)

Chris 


My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 3 May 2022

Claim a free copy of History Scotland magazine

From History Scotland magazine (www.historyscotland.com):

Sign up to the History Scotland newsletter and claim your free issue of History Scotland

History Scotland are offering a free issue of the popular magazine!

    Members of the public can claim a free issue of History Scotland
    The digital magazine is available when you sign up to the History Scotland newsletter
    The popular newsletter features history news, articles, offers and more
    The Jan/Feb 2022 issue , being offered for free, is usually priced £4.99

How to claim the free issue…

Members of the public with an interest in Scottish history are being encouraged to sign up to the free History Scotland newsletter, which is emailed to thousands of enthusiasts every fortnight.

Once they sign up they will immediately receive access to the full Jan/Feb 2022 issue, as a digital ‘page-turner’ edition.

To register, visit https://www.historyscotland.com/account/register

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.