Friday, 27 November 2020

FindmyPast expands coverage of Scottish monumental inscriptions

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) has extended its coverage of Scottish monumental inscriptions with a further 600,000 entries as sourced from the following societies:

    Aberdeen & North East Scotland FHS
    Caithness FHS
    Dumfries & Galloway FHS
    East Ayrshire FHS
    Highland FHS
    Lanarkshire FHS
    Moray Burial Ground Research Group
    Scottish Genealogy Society
    Tay Valley FHS
    Troon@Ayrshire FHS

Commenting on the release, FindmyPast states "This landmark release is the latest step in our drive to become the home of Scottish family history. Over the last year, we've added over 150 million new records from across the country, making Findmypast one of the best places online to research your Scottish family tree."

In addition to this, FindmyPast has also added Caribbean First World War Rolls of Honour, United States, World War II Casualty Lists, and service records for the British Army, Coldstream Guards 1800-1947, as well as additional newspaper content.

For further details visit the latest announcement at https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/scottish-monumental-inscriptions 


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

NRS remains closed as TNA again re-opens

From the National Archives in England (www.nationalarchives.gov.uk):

We can confirm that our reading room services will resume from Tuesday 8 December, in line with the new local restriction tier system.

All visitors must continue to book their visit and order their documents in advance. We will be offering greater capacity in our reading rooms, with more documents per visitor and a greater choice of bookable dates, including Saturdays.

We will open reading room bookings on Tuesday 1 December at 12:00 (midday). As our services have been suspended for a four-week period we are expecting increased demand, and so we will be making bookings available for the period of Tuesday 8 December to Saturday 2 January (inclusive), excluding Christmas and New Year closure dates.

We want to give as many people the chance to access records as possible, and in consideration of this we will initially be asking visitors to book no more than two visits in this period. Bookings for subsequent dates will be released on a more regular basis soon.

We were forced to cancel the bookings of a number of visitors earlier this month, when national restrictions came into effect. We will be contacting these visitors directly to ensure that they are able to re-book their visit before we make bookings more widely available, and will be re-opening our reading rooms for some of these visitors on 3 and 4 December.

Before planning a visit, we would encourage visitors to refer to government guidance relating to local COVID alert levels and how travel restrictions might affect your visit – this applies to any areas you might need to travel through, as well as the areas you are travelling to and from. From 2 December, The National Archives is located within a High alert area (tier 2).

All of these arrangements are subject to change at short notice, due to factors outside our control. Please check our website or social media for further updates.

(Original story at https://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/about/news/coronavirus-update/)


Comment: Meanwhile, in Scotland... 

As announced earlier (https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/11/national-records-of-scotland-issues.html), the National Records of Scotland, the only UK based national archive to have remained closed throughout the pandemic, has stated that it hopes to trial some limited re-opening early next year. This is a welcome move, but it does once again flag up how behind we are the rest of the UK in terms of a functioning national archive provision.

I have long stated that whilst the staff at the NRS do a great job - and they are currently working like troopers in the pandemic - the building itself is not fit for purpose, something the archive itself conceded with its estates review some six years ago now (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.com/2014/07/comparing-uks-three-national-archives.html). It's a pretty building, well located, but its sheer impracticability is its greatness weakness - too much is stored offsite, that which is onsite is not secure (see http://britishgenes.blogspot.com/2019/07/shock-as-national-records-of-scotland.html), and in the current pandemic, its very design is proving to be a blockage to access, with inadequate ventilation and ability to control the flow of people to minimise the risks from coranavirus. And as can be seen with the recent move by the Edinburgh based NLS to open a facility in Glasgow also, the idea that our national archive should even be completely Edinburgh based in an increasingly digital era is something I personally think should also be thrown into the mix for consideration.

Rome was not built in a day, but the idea of Rome was a first step. Once the pandemic is over - and absolutely the pandemic must remain the current priority - we may not be in a position to secure a new purpose built facility in the immediate term, but as an aspiration it must come back onto the agenda.

Chris  

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

National Records of Scotland issues service update

From the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk):

NRS Updates: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information

NRS on site services are currently closed to the public. However, we are continuing to deliver business critical services, including providing urgent legal documents to support the property market, the probate sector and court services, and official birth, death and marriage certificates to enable citizens to obtain passports, employment and register with GPs, as well as the processing of Adoption Orders.

Full building re-opening including public access to NRS buildings is not expected to take place until Phase 4 of the Scottish Government route map. However, we are considering whether it may be possible to offer some limited access to digital and physical records onsite in early 2021. Due to difficulties with ventilation and entry and exit routes, it is not possible to effectively mitigate COVID-19 risks to allow public access to the Historical Search Room.

We have therefore carried out feasibility planning on alternative available spaces to identify where it may be possible to open to provide access to both our digital and physical records, on a very limited basis. Following appropriate preparatory work we anticipate that access will be available in early 2021 on a limited and appointment only basis. This will allow us to continue to prepare public access space in buildings and to ensure that all the relevant protocols are in place to protect the health of our staff and customers. 

We appreciate your understanding whilst we take time to plan limited re-opening carefully and look forward to welcoming you back to our buildings when it is safe to do so.



Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 26 November 2020

FamilyTree DNA sale

FamilyTree DNA currently has a sale on. And as the North of Ireland Family History Society (www.nifhs.org) flagged it up for me, here's how they can help you order up a test!

Want a Christmas present without having to wait for the shops to reopen? The Black Friday sale is on now at Family Tree DNA!
 
Family Finder kits now only £36.70 ($49) if purchased by next Tuesday. Free delivery applies if purchased through the North of Ireland Family History Society. You can get a kit from your local branch or, if you aren't a member and have a UK address, you can still take advantage of this price if you send an email requesting a kit to dna@nifhs.org with your name and address. We will then set up the order and send you an email with payment instructions allowing you to pay FTDNA directly. Your kit will be posted to you (no delivery charge) once you pay for the kit.

You can also order the test direct from FamilyTree DNA via www.familytreedna.com

 

(With thanks to Martin McDowell)

Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 24 November 2020

Need a Christmas prezzie? My Scottish and Irish genealogy books might help!

If you are looking for a book or two for Christmas, to give as presents to your genealogy obsessed relatives, or to hide away with yourself (if and) when the snow starts to fall, my recent titles from Pen and Sword Family History may help may help! 

Titles include:

Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet

Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (Second Edition)

Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records

You can find full details on the titles, and how to obtain them, from Pen and Sword at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Chris-Paton/a/1799

I hope they help!

Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist.  Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

ScotlandsPeople adds mothers' maiden names to 1 million death record indexes

ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) has added a million or so mother's maiden names to its online death record indexes, from between 1855 and 1880. Here's the announcement:

Update on mother’s maiden name for statutory death records

We are pleased to advise that updates are currently being made to the mother's maiden name search field in the statutory register of deaths index, as part of our ongoing improvements to our website and in response to your requests in our customer survey. Before 1974 the deceased's mother's maiden name was not routinely included. Where this information was included on the death records before this date we are retrospectively adding this to the index beginning with the years closest to the introduction of statutory registration in 1855. We have now updated most years up to 1880, adding mother’s maiden names to more than 1 million records, and plan to have completed records up to 1883 by the end of this year. You can populate the name search fields and also choose to 'include unrecorded mother's maiden surname'. You may find that if you enter a name in this search field and the information has not yet been added or it was unavailable at the time of registration then a result will not be found. 

In addition, ScotlandsPeople has also added a further 1,000 more maps and plans of areas of Scotland:

We have uploaded almost 1,000 more maps and plans of areas of Scotland, all with a link to the Year of Coasts and Waters 2020. We have published a new article which focuses on several of these plans and their connection with surveyors and engineers of Scotland's past, including the drafted plans of Thomas Telford the Scottish civil engineer, architect and stonemason. 

If you are interested in discovering more about Scotland's industrial history, the image library is a great place to visit.

The library holds diverse collections of photographs, and we have explored the images to learn more about the Upper Clyde Shipbuilders with a new feature article. The shipbuilding image collection consists of almost 1,200 photographs of various ships built in John Brown & Company's shipyard, Clydebank, including HMS Hood, SS Avila Star, RMS Queen Mary and RMS Queen Elizabeth 2. Find out about all of the ships featured in the image library in our new research guide.  

With thanks to ScotlandsPeople via email - the full newsletter is online at http://email.scotlandspeople.gov.uk/q/17FfLWsTOUcYaDMYnZesLg/wv


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Strathclyde genealogy student seeks help with resilience survey

A student from the University of Strathclyde's Masters genealogy students is seeking assistance with a survey looking at whether the act of doing genealogy and/or finding out about ancestors who coped with challenges has helped build greater levels of resiliency particularly over the last 8 months. 

The following is the request:

My name is Kathleen Norris. I am a Master’s student in the Genealogy, Palaeographic and Heraldic Studies program at the University of Strathclyde and I am seeking individuals 18 years and older from the genealogy community to take a survey for me.  The anonymous survey is about 15-20 minutes in length depending on your answers. My purpose is to learn how much genealogy as a practice and the discovery of family stories each impact resilience.

I am grateful to you for your willingness to participate.

Sincerely,

Kathleen Norris

And the link for the survey itself is:

https://hass.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bKoFlK4wkfHtnrD

If readers can help, I am sure it will be much appreciated!



Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 22 November 2020

MyHeritage sale - DNA tests for £39

MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com) is currently offering autosomal DNA tests for sale in the UK at just £39 (€45), down from the usual £79, as part of a sale that expires on Friday 27th November. (The cost for delivery in the UK appears to be a further £9, although there is free shipping for two or more kits).

For further details, and to order, visit https://www.myheritage.com/dna/68768861


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Family History Federation's Really Useful Show returns in April 2021

The Family History Federation (www.familyhistoryfederation.com) has announced that its next Really Useful Family History Show will take place on Saturday 10th April 2021. 

No further details are available as yet, but you can bookmark the event's page at www.fhf-reallyuseful.com, where further details will be announced in the near future.


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

How Zoom can help family history societies to survive and evolve

One of the results of the current coronavirus pandemic is that many family historians who have in the past given talks to family history societies are now doing so online. It's an eloquent situation, but it is one that has its pros and its cons. But it occurs to me that for every society that is beginning to get to grips with it as a solution to lockdown, there will be others undoubtedly still to take the leap, and so this short post is really just to provide a wee overview and some brief thoughts that might help groups to decide to go for it!

First, a brief description of Zoom from my forthcoming book, Sharing Your Family History Online:

ii) Zoom
https://zoom.us

Although established in 2011, California based Zoom Video Communications really came into its own during the coronavirus pandemic of 2020, as a major free to access videoconferencing tool, not only for business use, but for families who were locked down. For children who were home schooling it was a handy means for teachers to share lessons, particularly when Zoom extended the free time limit for free basic sessions for schools, whilst for many families it had the added bonus of bringing together relatives through fun activities such as weekly quizzes.

The free Basic version of Zoom permits video conferencing calls of up to forty minutes for meetings involving three or more participants, to a maximum limit of one hundred, although a meeting link can be re-used upon the session's expiry to continue the conversation, if everyone signs in again. Subscription based options permit longer meetings up to 24 hours, with capacity for 100, 300, 500 or 1000 participants, dependant on the selected plan.

When hosting a webinar, you can share a Powerpoint presentation with your fellow participants, or demonstrate some other activity using your computer. You can also extend the reach for those who may wish to watch by streaming the session live on either Facebook or YouTube – in so doing, a live stream to either platform counts as a single attendee to your Zoom conference. A useful video guide from Zoom on how to do this is available on YouTube at https://youtu.be/UkX640vqozE. Zoom sessions can also be recorded.

 

As a speaker, Zoom (and other platforms such as GoToWebinar and Facetime) has been a wonderful tool that has allowed me to continue to give presentations this year, including the replacement of two major overseas events in the US that had to be reconstructed virtually instead. As a platform it has its pros and cons – on the one hand, I can speak, but on the other, I now have to sit down throughout, and I like to move around when giving talks, and to see people as I am talking to them!

I have been struck by the number of groups in recent weeks who have told me that they had only just started with Zoom, in some cases with me or others as their first, or one of their first, speakers, and so it occurs to me there are many groups out there that are still to perhaps take the plunge and give it a go. So what might be the benefits - what's all the fuss? 

Some quick pointers!

  • Zoom sessions are a means to interact in a lockdown, to see each other face to face and to converse, something that many of us have been seriously missing!
  • Zoom sessions can go beyond the traditional family history meeting in the local library or museum. Overseas members can access meetings as easily as local members, although there may be some time zone issues – but talks can also be recorded and played back for members at more convenient times after the event, if stored in a members area, and with a speaker's consent. (Tea is not provided, but not everyone around the world drinks tea!)
  • Zoom hosted talks can also attract speakers from beyond the usual pastures – and no travel expenses are involved.
  • Societies can also carry out closed business sessions through Zoom, such as AGMs.
  • Not all attending Zoom presentations need to access them through Zoom itself – you can stream them live to Facebook or YouTube at the same time.


In terms of getting started, there is a small learning curve, but only in the sense that it is just a new thing, and there are many societies that have already taken the plunge, with a growing pool of expertise out there. It's really not that scary. Zoom is simply accessed through a desktop browser or by downloading an app. Once you register to attend a session, you click on a link in the email confirming your registration and open it in the browser or app, and then simply enable your camera mic and webcam with on screen controls (and you don't even need to do that if you simply want to just watch). You can also ask questions using an on screen text chat facility. As a speaker, you can be given the option to share your screen, to show a Powerpoint presentation, or perhaps to demonstrate a technique with a website. It's all very intuitive.

One of the most impressive stories I have heard about Zoom in recent months with regards to family history societies was that from Aberdeen and North East Scotland FHS which I ran last week (http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/11/aberdeen-and-north-east-scotland-fhs.html). The society is now encouraging the growth of localised Zoom meetings worldwide for groups in places such as Brisbane, Ontario and London, with local members who have connections to the society's patch. It struck me that this is a great way to encourage the growth of a society, and to bring in the diaspora more, many of whom in the past may simply have only experienced a society's journal as a member benefit – now you can collaborate online with other local members in your part of the world and to attend the same sessions as the parent branches. As an innovation it reminded me of the leap taken by some societies a few years back to offer digital versions of journals, as a means to get content out quicker and to save on production and postage costs – equally embracing the digital era and its opportunities.

Blended learning and blended teaching is now also a thing. My son is at home right now in self-isolation, after someone in his school year contracted Covid. Thankfully my son is fine, but from home his schooling has not been disrupted at all - he can still attend school every day using a digital conferencing platform, where he can watch the teacher in the classroom from his bedroom, and where he can also interact. This form of blended teaching, with some online attendees and some attendees at school in person, seems to me to be an approach that can equally be applied to a family history society once we get out of the pandemic, with talks given in local libraries and museums as before, but with attendees also able to drop in from around the world via Zoom. In some cases societies are also recording Zoom presentations and making them available in their online members areas afterwards for a few weeks, for those unable to attend on the night.

If you are interested in finding out more, there are plenty of other groups that have already taken the plunge, with a lot of accrued experience and if it is not already available, there could well be a good leadership opportunity for umbrella bodies such as SAFHS (www.safhs.org.uk) or the Family History Federation (www.familyhistoryfederation.com) to provide some guidance to their member bodies on getting the best out of Zoom.

If you have yet to give Zoom a go, I hope you'll consider it, either as a society, or as an attendee - it offers a lot of potential. Good luck!

* Sharing Your Family History Online is out in January 2021 and is available to pre-order from Pen and Sword Family History at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Sharing-Your-Family-History-Online-Paperback/p/18718. For a list of forthcoming talks I'm giving online, please consult my Diary page at http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/p/diary.html.


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 21 November 2020

British Newspaper Archive reaches 40 million pages target

Congratulations to the British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) on reaching its target of forty million pages.  Here's the current tally:

As noted last week (http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/11/british-newspaper-archive-will-continue.html), the project has clarified that it intends to keep going, although for how much longer, and to what new target, has yet to be anounced on its site.

In the meantime, here is an update on additions in the last 30 days

Rugeley Times
1926-1928, 1935-1945

Reynolds's Newspaper
1901, 1903

Civil & Military Gazette (Lahore)
1880-1883, 1885, 1887, 1895-1898, 1900-1905, 1907-1909

Dundee Courier
1992

Widnes Examiner
1885-1886, 1888, 1890, 1892

Halifax Evening Courier
1960

Kinematograph Weekly
1932-1944, 1946-1947, 1953-1959

Lynn Advertiser
1913-1925, 1929-1944

South Wales Echo
1881, 1886, 1889

Rhyl Record and Advertiser

1878, 1888-1900

Mansfield & Sutton Recorder
1989

Monmouthshire Merlin

1841-1842, 1844-1848, 1852-1853, 1856-1870, 1872-1873, 1875-1877, 1879-1880

Tablet
1908

Usk Observer
1856-1858, 1861, 1866

Warrington Examiner
1870-1875, 1884-1888, 1891, 1894, 1903, 1905-1908

Carmarthen Weekly Reporter
1896-1900

Cardiff Times
1871, 1876

South Wales Daily News
1874, 1891, 1893, 1898

Cardiff and Merthyr Guardian, Glamorgan, Monmouth, and Brecon Gazette
1845, 1848-1849, 1854-1855, 1858, 1866-1867

Glamorgan Free Press
1899

Aberystwyth Times
1870

Pontypool Free Press
1886-1889

South Wales Daily Post
1895

Montgomery County Times and Shropshire and Mid-Wales Advertiser
1894-1896, 1899-1900

Wrexham Guardian and Denbighshire and Flintshire Advertiser
1875, 1877-1879

Drogheda Conservative
1852-1853, 1870-1879


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Irish Newspaper Archives 50% off subscriptions sale

The Irish Newspaper Archives has a sale on just now, with 50% off subscriptions.

You'll find the details, including a list of the newspaper titles available, at www.irishnewsarchive.com/blackfriday2020.


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Who Do You Think You Are? December 2020 issue now on sale

The latest edition of Who Do You Think You Are? magazine (www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com) is now on sale:

  • Give your tree the WDYTYA? treatment Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine editor Sarah Williams shares top behind-the-scenes tips from the TV series to help you uncover your family history
  • Reader survey Tell us what you think about the magazine for your chance to win a £200 Marks & Spencer e-Gift Card
  • New census series
Don't miss our new monthly series exploring UK census records as far back as 1801
  • Christmas crackers The cracking story behind the festive tradition
  • World War Two army service records
All you need to know about discovering the war heroes in your family tree
  • Plus: The best websites for finding cemetery records; researching shipwrecks; finding Polish refugees in your family tree, and much more!

Price £5.25

The magazine is available at WH Smith as well as selected supermarkets and all good magazine retailers. For digital editions, visit https://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/magazine/


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

New edition of NRS's Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors

The National Records of Scotland has announced the publication of a seventh edition of its best selling Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors, now available from https://birlinn.co.uk/product/tracing-your-scottish-ancestors-3/. From the site:

About the Book

This is a new edition of the bestselling guide to this increasingly popular pursuit. Scotland has the best-maintained records and facilities of any country in the world for undertaking family research, and now that the National Archives of Scotland are available online they can be consulted by anyone from whatever country.

Tracing Your Scottish Ancestors is the National Archives' official guide and is written in an accessible style from the unique perspective of a custodian of the records. It details all the latest internet developments, including a chapter on family history on the web. It also points to more traditional resources, explaining step by step how to research records of births, marriages and wills.


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Deceased Online adds further London records

If your ancestors moved south to the London Borough of Lambeth, records from Streatham Cemetery, now available on Deceased Online (www.deceasedonline.com), might help with your research. The cemetery opened in 1893 under the Metropolitan Burial Act of 1852, which was instigated after the cholera epidemic of 1848 to 1849.

Whilst no new Scottish records appear to be in the works in the foreseeable future, Deceased Online is currently working on further records from England's East Midlands, London, the West Midlands, and the South East.

Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

FindmyPast adds further military records

The latest releases on FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) include:

British Armed Forces Soldiers' Wills 1850-1986
Covering over 130 years of British military history, discover your family heroes' last wishes in these important records. Each indexed record can reveal your relative's name, regimental number and when they died. You can then use this information to order a copy of the original will from the official government website.

Ireland, Londonderry (Derry) War Memorial 1914-1918
The Diamond War Memorial in Londonderry (Derry) lists hundreds of locals who lost their lives in the Great War. These records can help you unlock their remarkable stories.

British Red Cross & Order of St John Enquiry List, Wounded & Missing, 1914-1919
The collection consists of lists published by The British Red Cross & Order of St John between 1915 and 1918.

Newspapers
Three new papers:

    Widnes Examiner from 1892-1896, 1898, 1900-1902, 1904, 1906 and 1908-1909
    Runcorn Examiner from 1873 and 1891
    St. Helens Examiner from 1891

Updated:

    Drogheda Conservative covering 1852-1888 and 1890-1896
    Halifax Evening Courier covering 1940-1943 and 1959-1960
    Kinematograph Weekly covering 1931-1944, 1946-1947 and 1953-1960
    Civil & Military Gazette (Pakistan) covering 1876-1883 and 1885
    Daily Record covering 1897
    Somerset Guardian and Radstock Observer covering 1904-1910, 1912-1962


Further details and relevant links area available at https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/british-irish-military-records


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Further R.A.F. Operations Record Books released on TheGenealogist

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

Additional R.A.F. Operations Record Books released on TheGenealogist

TheGenealogist has today released additional new R.A.F. records that are fully searchable by name, aircraft, location and many other fields, making it simpler to find your air force ancestors.

In a release of over 1.8 million records, this batch of R.A.F. Operations Record Books (ORBs) joins TheGenealogist’s huge military records collection and includes entries for the famous children’s author Roald Dahl when he flew Hurricanes in WW2.

The Operations Record Books record the stories of day to day operations of units and so will give the researcher an idea of action that took place as well as give insights into the everyday lives on the bases. You can use this collection to follow an airman’s war time experiences by searching these fully searchable Air Ministry operations record books which cover various Royal Air Force, dominion and Allied Air Force squadrons that came under British Command. The AIR 27 records allow the family history researcher a fascinating insight into their relatives' time while serving in a number of units of the air force.

The ORBs give summaries of events and can reveal encounters with the enemy, pilots who went missing or were shot down, plane crashes, as well as less traumatic details such as weather and places patrolled by the aircraft and where the squadrons were based as the war wore on. As aircrew personnel are named in these Operations Record Books, researchers wanting to follow where an ancestor had been posted to and what may have happened to them will find these records extremely useful.

Family historians will find the duties recorded in these documents interesting when they reveal the assignments that a serviceman took part in. Examples include Bombing, Convoy Escort, Submarine Hunt, Fleet protection, Attacking Aerodromes and Shipping, Dive Bombing Raids and more.

Use these records to:

  • Add colour to an aircrewman’s story
  • Read the war movements of personnel in air force units
  • Discover if a pilot, navigator, radio operator or gunner is mentioned in the action
  • Find if an airman is listed for receiving an Honour or an Award
  • Note the names of squadron members wounded, killed, or who did not return
  • Easily search these National Archives records and images


This expands TheGenealogist’s extensive Military records collection.

Read TheGenealogist’s feature article: R.A.F. Operations Record Books that tell a storyteller’s story https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2020/raf-operations-record-books-that-tell-a-storytellers-story-1356/

These records and many more are available to Diamond subscribers of TheGenealogist.co.uk 

(With thanks to Nick Thorne)


Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

PRONI extends closure until December 11th

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni) has announced that its current closure has been extended from Friday, November 27th until Friday, December 12th 2020, as part of new measures from the Northern Irish Assembly to try to stem the increase in coronavirus infections.

For further details visit https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/getting-proni-and-opening-hours.


UPDATE:  **PRONI closure to the public extended to Friday 11th December**

In line NI Executive measures to curb the spread of Covid-19, PRONI will continue to be closed to the public until Friday 11th December.

Visitor appointments within this period are now cancelled, and those affected will be contacted directly.

What we do have for you is a packed week of online events for Explore Your Archive Week next week, alongside our participation in their social media campaign.

What is an archive, what do we hold, how do we look after it, what can YOU do with our collections? All these questions, and more will be explored in our events next week.

Full details can be found on our website but here’s an idea of what you can expect:

Monday @ 2pm – Conservation and Collections Care: Preserving PRONI’s archive – hear from our lead conservator Sarah Graham about how she looks after our 3.5 million records.

Tuesday @ 2pm – A Beginners Guide to Using DNA for Family history. Martin McDowell from North of Ireland Family History Society will show you how to use your DNA results to help build your family tree.

Wednesday @ 2pm – Putting You In The Picture: An Introduction to the UTV Archive – Ann Donnelly from Northern Ireland Screen will show you some highlights from the UTV archive, currently preserved and being digitised at PRONI.

Thursday @ 2pm – Researching Presbyterians in Ireland - Dr William Roulston from Ulster Historical Foundation will show you how to research your Presbyterian ancestors.

Friday @ 2pm – Dead of the Revolution – Dr Darragh Gannon from Ulster Society for Irish Historical Studies will interview author Professor Eunan O’Halpin about his recently publicised book Dead of the Revolution.

These are FREE and online but booking is essential. We look forward to having you there!

https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/articles/talks-and-events-proni

(With thanks to Larne branch of NIFHS via Facebook)

Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 19 November 2020

Ancestry adds 30 million Canadian obituary notices from Newspapers.com

Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) has added a new collection of 30,877,928 obituaries from Canadian newspapers, which may help with tracing your emigrant ancestors:

Canada, Newspapers.com Obits Index, 1800s-current
www.ancestry.co.uk/search/collections/62226/

This database consists of facts extracted from obituaries found on Newspapers.com™ dating from the early 1800’s to current. 

Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

ScotlandsPeople service disruption announcement

From ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk):

Essential Maintenance - Wednesday 25th November 2020

Due to essential maintenance the site will be unavailable between the hours of 17:30 and 21:00 GMT on Wednesday 25th November 2020.

We apologise for any inconvenience that this may cause.

Chris

Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Scottish Indexes announces speakers and talks for Dec 6th conference

Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes.com) has announced the speakers and topics for its forthcomign conference on December 6th:

Here are the presentations we are looking forward to on Sunday 6 December 2020:

  • ‘The Highlands: Jacobites, Clearances and Emigration’, by Lorna Steele, Community Engagement Officer at the Highland Archive Centre.
  • 'Understanding Scottish Inheritance Records' by Chris Paton, genealogist at www.scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk and author of ‘Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry through Church and State Records’, available here.
  • 'Researching Scottish Ancestors from a Distance', by B.J. Jamieson, genealogy reference specialist at Maine State Library.
  • 'Using FindMyPast to go Beyond Basic Birth, Marriage & Death Records', by Myko Clelland, genealogist at FindMyPast.
  • ‘Your Burning DNA Questions’, by Michelle Leonard of Genes & Genealogy, co-author of ‘Tracing Your Ancestors Using DNA: A Guide for Family Historians’, available here.
  • 'Borders Family History Society', an interview with Elma Fleming, chair of Borders Family Society.
  • 'Orkney Family History Society', by Jackie Harrison of Orkney Family Society.
  • ‘Using Kirk Session Records’ by Emma Maxwell, Genealogist at Scottish Indexes.
  • Genealogy Q&A, hosted by Graham and Emma Maxwell
  • The schedule itself will be annlounced shortly at www.scottishindexes.com

    Once again it should be fun!

    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    Conflict, Memory and Migration project seeks NI born migrants to Britain to participate

    From the Conflict, Memory and Migration project (https://conflictmemorymigration.org):

    We are currently seeking individuals who would like to take part in our project by doing an oral history interview.

    Did you move from Northern Ireland to Manchester, London or Glasgow in the 1950s, 1960s, 1970s or later? Or were you born in Manchester, London or Glasgow to parents (one or both) from Northern Ireland? If so, we’d like to hear from you.

    If you are from Northern Ireland, we want to hear about your childhood, upbringing and education there; your experiences of migration to and settlement in Great Britain; your experiences of work, family life, politics and leisure activities; your experience of the Troubles in Great Britain; and your reflections on the impact of migration and the conflict on your sense of identity and belonging.

    If you were born in Great Britain, we want to hear about your childhood, upbringing and education; your experiences of work, family life, politics and leisure activities, including journeys and visits to Northern Ireland; your experience of the Troubles in Great Britain and their impact on your identity formation and sense of self; and your reflections on the impact of your Northern Irish heritage more broadly on your senses of identity and belonging.

    Your interview is intended to be an enjoyable occasion that gives you the opportunity to remember and reflect on important aspects of your life experience. By doing so, you will also contribute to wider understanding of this neglected history.

    Participants must be over eighteen years of age.

    If you are interested in taking part, please contact us on 0161 306 1370 or by email:

    conflictmemorymigration@manchester.ac.uk

    Alternatively, you may contact the interviewers directly at the following email addresses:

    Dr Barry Hazley – barry.hazley@manchester.ac.uk

    Dr Fearghus Roulston – fbr11@brighton.ac.uk

    Dr Jack Crangle – jack.crangle@manchester.ac.uk 

    Comment: By coincidence my article in this month's Family Tree magazine touches on some of the themes here, so I will definitely be getting in touch.

    (With thanks to @ConflictMemory on Twitter)


    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    Glasgow and West of Scotland FHS's new website

    If you have not had a look yet, do check out Glasgow and West of Scotland Family History Society's snazzy new website at www.gwsfhs.org.uk - a job well done!


    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    Glasgow's museums and libraries to temporarily close

    From Glasgow Life (www.glasgowlife.org.uk):

    In line with the Scottish Government’s level four Covid-19 restrictions, Glasgow Life will temporarily close all museums, libraries, Glasgow Club gyms and Tramway to the public from 6pm on Friday (20 November) until at least Friday 11 December. For Glasgow Life’s latest Covid-19 updates, visit https://bit.ly/2U6usMg

    This includes the Mitchell Library, home to Glasgow City Archives, but note that some resources are accessible online - for further details visit https://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/libraries/city-archives/collections

    Despite Glasgow Life's announcement that closures will be from 6pm on Friday, the list of venues at https://www.glasgowlife.org.uk/media/6808/20201119-sg-level-four-closures-final.pdf actually notes most libraries closing at 4pm, with the Mitchell closing earlier at 3pm.

    Note that eleven authority areas are going into Level 4 coronovirus restrictions from Friday, and will almost certainly be doing likewise. The others are East Dunbartonshire, East Renfrewshire, Renfrewshire and West Dunbartonshire, North and South Lanarkshire, East and South Ayrshire, Stirling and West Lothian.(NB: The Ayrshire Archive service has already been closed for most of this year to facilitate a premises move to Ayr next year). 

    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    Wednesday, 18 November 2020

    WDYTYA? magazine announces next Transcription Tuesday event

    Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine (www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com) has announced that its next Transcription Tuesday event will be held on Tuesday February 2nd 2021. The magazine will be partnering with FamilySearch, the Addressing Health project from Kingston University, the Voices Through Time project from Coram, and the Every Name Counts project from Arolsen Archives. 

    Further details on the event can be found on the magazine's website at www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/news/transcription-tuesday-2021-who-do-you-think-you-are-magazine/.

    (With thanks to Rosemary Collins)


    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    Tuesday, 17 November 2020

    Temporary closure of the NLS at Kelvin Hall from Friday 20th November

    From the National Library of Scotland (www.nls.uk):

    Following today's announcement by the First Minister on Covid-19 restrictions, the National Library at Kelvin Hall will close to the public at 16.00 on Friday 20 November until restrictions are lifted.

    In the meantime, you can access our digital resources and online workshops and events.

    (Source: https://www.nls.uk/service-disruption)

    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    Further Limerick records added to RootsIreland

    From RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.ie)

    New County Limerick Records Added

    We are pleased to announce that Limerick Genealogy has added 11,000 records to its database at rootsireland.ie/limerick including the following records:

    • Presbyterian marriage records from Limerick 1813-1841 - 42 records
    • Knocklong Roman Catholic marriage records 1830 & 1855-1860 - 137 records
    • Knocklong Roman Catholic baptismal records 1817-1819 & 1854 - 312 records
    • Caherconlish Roman Catholic marriage records 1843-1846 - 117 records
    • Caherconlish Roman Catholic baptismal records 1841-1845 - 528 records
    • 1821, 1841 & 1851 Census abstracts - 639 records
    • Transcribed parish census from Pallasgrean in 1834 - 213 records
    • Titaldoes of Limerick from Pender's Census, 1659 - 808 records
    • Biographical notices of births, deaths and marriages from the Limerick Chronicle newspaper, 1823-1855 - 7106 records
    • References to residents and subscribers from Limerick in Samuel Lewis' A Topographical Dictionary of Ireland, 1837 - 726 records
    • Teachers in Limerick in 1824 listed in the Second Report from Commissioners of Irish Education Inquiry, 1826 - 505 records.


    In addition to the above, where available, Limerick Genealogy has extended non-Catholic baptismal records up to 1919, non-Catholic church and civil marriages up to 1919 and death/burial records up to 1919. Updates and corrections to the database have also been made.

    (With thanks to RootsIreland via email)

    Chris 

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    A busy period for online talks!

    Thanks to those who have facilitated and attended talks that I have given over the last three days, it's been a busy weekend!

    First, the Really Useful Family History Show was an online event hosted by the Family History Federation (www.familyhistoryfederation.com), in which I gave a talk about the Ruhleben POW camp at Berlin, in which 5500 British male civilians were interned in the First World War for simply being in the wrong place at the wrong time. This was a fairly new venture for the FHF, and despite some issues surrounding communication, the range of talks was superb, there was a good attendance by vendors, and a good buzz online. My talk is still available online for those who registered, at https://youtu.be/s_dP1eZqTV4, although I'm not sure for how much longer (UPDATE: I've just learned that they will be available until Saturday November 21st!). If interested in my Ruhleben website, it is at http://ruhleben.tripod.com.

    On Sunday I then had the pleasure to speak to the Virtual Genealogical Association (https://virtualgenealogy.org) conference on British and Irish newspapers, which was great fun, and with a great reception (and with some great Zoom backgrounds and outfits!!). I mentioned my Pen and Sword books in that for future reference (www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Chris-Paton/a/1799), but I did also produce a short guide book six years ago for Australian based Unlock the Past on the topic, which can be found online in ebook format at www.gould.com.au/british-and-irish-newspapers-ebook/utpe0285/ (a print version is also available). It was written with an Oz readership in mind, but includes a lot that was discussed in the session.

    Finally, last night (Monday) I had the pleasure of talking to the Larne group of the North of Ireland Family History Society (www.nifhs.org/branches/larne/), on the topic of Tracing the Irish in Scotland. Larne in County Antrim was my town of birth some fifty years back, so it was particularly great to be able to talk to my ain folk, and there were a few laughs and some interesting discussion after (for well over an hour!)! I'll be giving the same talk to the society's Causeway branch on May 18th 2021, which I am looking forward to immensely.

    Thanks to all who attended the sessions. The next talk I will be doing will be as part of the next Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes.com) conference on December 6th, where I will be discussing Scottish inheritance records - if you are only used to the probate system in England, Wales and Ireland, brace yourself, we did things differently in Scotland, and there's a lot to get through!! 

    After the New Year, I will be participating in a fair few online events happening next year (see Diary for those already confirmed at scottishgenes.blogspot.com/p/diary.html), for societies in the US, Canada, Scotland, Northern Ireland and England - if you are interested in having me speak, there is a selection of some of my topics available at www.apgen.org/users/chris-paton, and I'd be more than happy to discuss any enquiries.

    Thanks again folks! 

    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    Monday, 16 November 2020

    Glasgow, Greenock and Dumfries prison register records added to Scottish Indexes

    From Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes.com):

    Family History Records Released for Glasgow, Greenock and Dumfries

    12,713 prison register entries have been added to Scotland's Criminal Database on www.scottishindexes.com.

    Huge thanks to an army of volunteers who have helped with this. We made a call for volunteers a couple of weeks ago and we were overwhelmed by the response. We were able to index a lot more entries than we anticipated!

    The entries are from Glasgow, Greenock and Dumfries and it takes the total number of entries in Scotland's Criminal Database to over 178,000!

    As with all our indexes, they are free to search and we give the full archive reference. Also, we have a unique URL for each entry making it easy to share with relatives and save the entry to your family tree.

    Prison registers are really helpful when you are tracing your family history. They tend to give a specific place of birth, in many cases even if a person was born outside Scotland. Prison registers can add colour to your family history as well as acting as a finding aid to even more records.  

    For further news, the Scottish Indexes Facebook page is at www.facebook.com/scottish.indexes


    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    MyHeritage gift memberships

    From MyHeritage (www.myheritage.com):


    Just in time for the holidays, we’re happy to announce the launch of the new MyHeritage gift membership! You can now give someone special the MyHeritage Complete plan, our best plan for family history research. To celebrate the launch, gift memberships are now available with a 50% introductory discount.

    With many people spending more time at home and looking for meaningful activities to enjoy, the MyHeritage gift membership makes the perfect holiday gift and is sure to delight a dear family member or close friend.

    The gift membership provides access to all features and all 12.7 billion historical records on MyHeritage.

    Please share this wonderful news with your audience, and read more about the new gift membership in the blog post.

    Order a gift membership in a few clicks, and your chosen recipient will receive an email explaining the super simple steps needed to redeem their gift.

    You can choose to give either a 1-year or 6-month gift membership. Gift memberships are one-time and do not renew. At the end of the membership period, the recipient will retain access to their MyHeritage account and all family tree data. If they wish to continue enjoying the full benefits of a membership, it will be up to them to extend their plan (or you can decide to be kind to them and give them another gift membership – it’s up to you).

    A gift membership on MyHeritage makes a great holiday or birthday gift. It’s the perfect way to introduce someone you care about to the enjoyable world of genealogy and help them discover their family history. 

    For further information visit https://blog.myheritage.com/2020/11/introducing-the-myheritage-gift-membership/ -  there's also a short vid below, and at https://youtu.be/ggJLn7XYf24

    (With thanks to Daniel Horowitz)

    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

    Aberdeen and North East Scotland FHS expands local groups worldwide

    The Aberdeen and North East Scotland Family History Society (www.anesfhs.org.uk) now has Local Area Groups in London, Melbourne, Brisbane, and Ontario, on top of the previously established local groups in Aberdeen, Moray/Banff, Glasgow, and Edinburgh. 

    According to society member Buzzy Garden, "the groups have been set up basically anywhere with sufficient ANESFHS members & willing person(s) to set up a more local Group and encourage communications/ meetings to suit. This was a boon to us when ANESFHS local groups started meetings by Zoom. 

    "These have been highly successful, not just attracting more members from wider parts of Scotland, and Englandshire, but meeting antipodean & transatlantic members in our various Scottish local groups (& vice-versa)."

    For further details on the new regional group events, please visit www.anesfhs.org.uk/meetings-events/events for the society's current programme.

    NB: I'll be speaking to the society on February 13th 2021 about Sharing Your Family History Online - more details soon!


    (With thanks to Buzzy)

    Chris

    Pre-order my next book, Sharing Your Family History Online, at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.