Sunday, 30 August 2020

My Discover Scottish Land Records talk

If you missed my talk on Scottish land records at the weekend's Scottish Indexes conference (www.scottishindexes.com), I have reproduced it below and made it available on YouTube at https://youtu.be/gBDpAr-mm-0 for this week only.



If you wish to know more about the topic, you can find out more in my Pen and Sword books Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records (https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Scottish-Ancestry-through-Church-and-State-Records-Paperback/p/16848), and Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet (https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Scottish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/17717), both of which are currently on offer in August at just £10.49 (RRP £14.99).


Thanks to Graham and Emma, and the other presenters for what was yet another great Scottish event, and I hope that all our efforts help with your research!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Scottish Indexes adds Canonbie kirk session record indexes

Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes.com) has added some of the Canonbie (Dumfriesshire) Kirk Session records indexes to its site, as follows:

Canonbie Kirk Session Minutes: Discipline cases involving the birth of an illegitimate child 1709-1855 - These have been added to the ‘Scottish Paternity Index’.

Canonbie Kirk Session: Irregular Marriages and 'Ante-nuptial fornication' cases 1709-1855. These entries have been added to the ‘Non-OPR Banns/Marriages’ collection.

The records have been indexed by Andrew Armstong, using images taken by Scottish Indexes. Andrew also has a PDF version of a more comprehensive index available on his site, which Scottish Indexes is linking through to it from its results page: https://www.scottishindexes.com/ksentry.aspx?ksid=1582140499


(With thanks to Emma Maxwell)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 28 August 2020

Sins as Red as Scarlet - Janet Few's latest book

So ye all know I'm an Ulsterman based in Scotland, but on the basis that my brother was Plymouth born and bred, and was known by my mum as the 'Devonshire Dumpling', along with the fact it includes research into witchcraft, plague, war and just about everything else you want from your family history, this one definitely gets in!

This is the latest book from genie pal Janet Few, and it sounds like a cracker...

Sins as Red as Scarlet: the True Story of a Devon Town in Turmoil
by Janet Few

New Novel Tells the True Story of Bideford’s Tumultuous Past

Local author and historian, Janet Few, has just released her second historical novel, which is set in Devon. Sins as Red as Scarlet is based on actual events that took place between 1640 and 1682; a time when the Age of Reason had begun and scientific thought was ousting superstitious belief. The menacing days of the witchfinder had all but gone. Nevertheless, in Devon’s county town, three impoverished women were condemned to death for the crime of witchcraft. They came from Bideford, a prosperous port, with flourishing tobacco warehouses and ships departing for the Newfoundland cod-banks or taking pottery across the Atlantic. It was a time of plague, of war and of religious dissent, all of which fashioned the prejudices and fears of the town’s inhabitants.

There is also a modern strand to the book, which follows sixteen-year-old Martha, as she researches the seventeenth century history of her home-town and comes to realise that human nature does not change; intolerance and peer pressure have always exerted their power. Yet there have been and still are, those who stand aside from the bigotry and the victimisation. Probing the motivations and beliefs of Bideford’s seventeenth century residents, Martha comes to understand how past events might lead ordinary people to become the victims, the accusers, or the accused. In the process, Martha finds a new resilience, enabling her to rise above those who seek to demean her.

Janet, who is known internationally in the world of genealogy, has meticulously researched the life of each of her characters, using the techniques of the family historian. In this way, she has uncovered some facts that are not widely known about the individuals who feature in her story. She says “My work as an historical interpreter means that I live in the seventeenth century, in the guise of my alter ego Mistress Agnes. She is a formidable goodwife of a certain age, who leads a somewhat chaotic life during the time of the English Civil War. Writing this book was a wonderful opportunity to use both my knowledge of the social history of that time and also my genealogical background, as I describe Martha’s research. I am fascinated by human behaviour and I was keen to draw parallels between witchcraft accusations and modern-day bullying.”

There are plenty of topical references in the book; the general election, Brexit and Bideford’s ‘Little White Town’ controversy all get a mention but writing the part of the novel that is set in 2020 was particularly challenging, Janet reveals. “Firstly, I had to remember what it was like to be sixteen. As I am still waiting to grow up, this wasn’t too difficult. What was more of a problem was that a significant part of the narrative takes place between June and September 2020 and the writing was almost complete when it became apparent that 2020 would not be an ordinary year. After much consideration, I decided that Martha should inhabit an alternative version of the year 2020. Although the seventeenth century portion of the book is based on fact, this is after all a novel. So, COVID-19 does exist in Martha’s world but its effects are far less severe.”

Always keen to collaborate with others who work in the creative industries, Janet has published the book through the North Devon publishing collective Blue Poppy Publishing bluepoppypublishing.co.uk. As with her previous novel, Janet worked with musician Dan Britton www.danbritton.co.uk, whose family are rooted in North Devon. He has composed a compelling companion song to the book. The powerful cover was designed by local artist, Robin Paul, of The Branch Line www.facebook.com/TheBranchLine. In addition, on the day that Sins as Red as Scarlet was launched, Janet’s earlier novel, Barefoot on the Cobbles, also based on a real Devon tragedy, became available as an audio book. This has been produced by Devon-based voice artists Circle of Spears Productions www.circleofspears.com.

Sins as Red as Scarlet can be obtained from Bideford bookshop, Walter Henry’s, from Blue Poppy Publishing and from the author. The first 500 purchasers who order directly from Janet, will also receive a complimentary copy of her social history of the seventeenth century Coffers, Clysters, Comfrey and Coifs. For details of this offer see thehistoryinterpreter.wordpress.com/historical-novels/sins-as-red-as-scarlet-the-story-of-a-devon-town-in-turmoil/.

Sins as Red as Scarlet is also available on Kindle from www.amazon.co.uk/Sins-Red-Scarlet-Devon-Turmoil-ebook/dp/B08G1HQRS4.


COMMENT: Definitely looking forward to reading this!

(With thanks to Janet)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

AGRA to host monthly family history question events

From the English and Welsh based organisation AGRA, the Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives (www.agra.org.uk):

An AGRA first – ASK AGRA: Family History Question Time podcast project

The Association of Genealogists and Researchers in Archives, the association representing professional genealogists in England and Wales,has announced their latest development a series of podcasts to be streamed via the www.agra.org.ukwebsite - Ask AGRA – Family History Question Time.

This initiative has been developed in response to the COVIDpandemic. Many consumers took the opportunity to begin researching their family history during the lockdown, but the closure of archives and cancellation of family history fairs and events has presented challenges which normally our members would help to resolve. Now, the free AGRA podcasts will be available to all, the first series of six to be made available monthly from 1st September 2020. AGRA members will form panels of experts in discussions led by Moderators such as Sarah Williams of Who Do You Think You Are? and Helen Tovey of Family Tree magazine. Some well-known authors and experts in their field will be adding their voices to the discussions including Gill Blanchard, Dr. Geoff Swinfield, Les Mitchinson and Simon Fowler,to name but a few.

The six themes will be as follows, broadcast on the 1st of each month:

1. House Histories - September
2. Ancestral research – getting started including understanding BMD and Census records - October
3. Research before 1837 - November
4. Military research including British service in India - December
5. DNA testing and use in conjunction with genealogical research - January 2021
6. Using land records such as maps and tithe maps to further research - February 2021

Sharon Grant, Chair of AGRA commented “AGRA is excited to announce this new initiative which demonstrates our commitment to finding new ways of working in these times of crisis. Our members have always been available at the various family history events to give advice to members of the public. We miss that, and we know you do too. This is an opportunity for you to access the extensive expertise and knowledge of our members from the safety of your own home. Get your questions in now!”.

The first in the series will go live on September 1st 2020 at https://www.agra.org.uk/podcasts. Members of the public are invited to submit general questions about the subjects to ask the panel on the above themes at Askagra@agra.org.uk.


(With thanks to Sharon Grant at AGRA)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Isle of Man newspaper archives access to remain free

A tip of the hat to US based blogger Dick Eastman for news that the Isle of Man's newspapers archive is to remain permanently available on a free basis. Access to the site at https://www.imuseum.im/newspapers/ was initially made free in mid-April (see http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/04/free-access-to-historic-isle-of-man.html).

For more on the story visit https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-isle-of-man-53854114 - Dick's initial post is at https://blog.eogn.com/2020/08/27/isle-of-man-online-newspaper-archive-to-remain-free-permanently/.


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

FamilySearch and Ontario Ancestors announce book scanning project

From FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org), an announcement that may be of help for tracing ancestors and relatives from Scotland who migrated to Ontario:

FamilySearch and Ontario Ancestors Announce Book Scanning Project
FamilySearch Canada Digital Book Initiative

Ontario Ancestors (https://ogs.on.ca) and FamilySearch International announced their new book scanning partnership. Under the agreement, FamilySearch will provide specialized book scanning services and support volunteers in exchange for access to Ontario Ancestors’ extensive library of historical and genealogical books. Digitized documents will be publicly available on both websites. Digitization is scheduled to begin by the end of 2020, depending on pandemic restrictions.

This agreement is a first for a genealogical society in Canada. Steve Fulton, UE, and president of Ontario Ancestors, said, “This agreement has no direct cost to us, but the benefits to the society are immeasurable.” Fulton added that the agreement is a direct result of many conversations Ontario Ancestors has had with a number of partners, and [it] is a key to delivering on the society’s goal of building up its digital presence by utilizing strong partnerships.

Dennis Meldrum, FamilySearch manager of book scanning partnerships, says Ontario Ancestors has one of the largest collections of family history and genealogy books in Canada. “It will be a privilege to work with Ontario Ancestors to digitize and share their impressive collection of books not under copyright,” said Meldrum.

This is the second time the two organizations have partnered on records preservation and access. The first digitization project was the Vernon Directories that began in 2019

For fruther details on the two partner agencies see the press release at https://media.familysearch.org/familysearch-and-ontario-ancestors-announce-book-scanning-project/


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 26 August 2020

Who Do You Think You Are? magazine September issue on sale

The latest edition of Who Do You Think You Are? magazine is now on sale, September 2020, issue 169.

In this issue I go where angels fear to tread by comparing the major census platforms for England, Scotland and Wales - which are the best to use, and what are their strengths and weaknesses? Undoubtedly everyone has their favourites, and it will be interesting to see if you agree with my conclusions!


Also in this issue is a great article from the University of Strathlcyde's Ali Macdonald and Graham Horton, explaining the university's project to trace descendants of the signatories of the Declaration of Arbroath using DNA. Additional articles look at Scottish fisher girls, the Blitz, ancestors at work, the American gold rush, and more.  

For further details, visit https://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/issue/who-do-you-think-you-are-magazine-september-2020/.


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 25 August 2020

Scottish Indexes updates Mental Health admissions database

From Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes.com):

We've just added more records to www.scottishindexes.com

This update has added paternity cases from Stirling Sheriff Court Extracted Decrees and Mental Health admissions from across Scotland from 1896-1900.

We are very grateful to our volunteers who have been busy indexing, thank you for all your hard work.


Don't forget the Scottish Indexes conference this coming Sunday August 30th - details available on the site!


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 24 August 2020

PRONI talk: Irish Voices from the Napoleonic Wars

The next PRONI lunchtime talk to be held online will look at the Napoleonic Wars froma an Irish perspective:

Irish Voices from the Napoleonic Wars
by Public Record Office of Northern Ireland

Thu, 3 September 2020
14:00 – 15:00 BST

Join us as we explore Irish Voices from the Napoleonic Wars primarily through the lens of PRONI's archives.

PRONI archivist, Brett Irwin, will look at such momentous events as the French Revolutionary Wars, the French invasion scares, the death of Lord Admiral Nelson, the Peninsular War, Napoleon's escape from Elba, the Congress of Vienna, and, of course, the Battle of Waterloo- where the fate of Europe was decided!

This event is taking place on Zoom. Sign-up closes 24 hours before the event and an invite will be sent to everyone registered 24 hours before the beginning of the event.

To sign up, visit https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/irish-voices-from-the-napoleonic-wars-tickets-115481326757


(With thanks to PRONI via Twitter)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 23 August 2020

Scottish Research Online course starts in a week's time

Just over a week to go until my next Scottish Research Online course starts (the third and final run this year), but there are still spaces available!


Scottish Research Online (102)
Tutor: Chris Paton

Scotland was one of the first countries to digitise its major family history records collections for accessibility online, and continues to this day to use such resources to promote a worldwide interest in family history for those with Caledonian connections. This course, originally created by genealogist Sherry Irvine, and now taught and regularly updated by Scottish based genealogist Chris Paton, describes the major sites and record types that you will encounter in your research, and how to analyse the results. Most importantly it will inspire you to actively pursue your interest in Scottish genealogy and take it to the next level.

Lesson Headings:
  • Understanding Scotlands People, FindmyPast, Family Search, Ancestry, and FreeCen
  • Essential Maps and Gazetteers
  • Civil Registration and Census Research
  • Searching in Church of Scotland Registers
  • Scottish Wills and Inventories
  • Bonus lesson - Take It From Here

Note: it is recommended but not required that students in this course sign up for the basic search option, 30 units/seven days, at ScotlandsPeople (cost is £7.50 for 30 credits)

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat - See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: "I particularly liked the fact that the course didn't just focus on the well-known BMD resources available, but on a much wider range of websites, including many which give extremely useful background information on the geography and history of the localities where our ancestors lived."

"a very knowledgeable Instructor"

Relevant Countries: Scotland

Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 31 Aug 2020
Cost: £49.99

For a wee video introduction to the course, see below or visit https://youtu.be/ssdYLlGtoHw



I'll hopefully see you there!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Scottish Indexes online conference schedule for August 30th

Scottish Indexes has put up the times for the talks being given as part of its next online conference this coming August 30th. To access the schedule (available for different worldwide time zones), please visit the site at www.scottishindexes.com, where you will also find details on how to register to attend.

For those watching in Scotland, elsewhere in Britain or in Ireland, I'll be doing my talk Discover Scottish Land Records at 8am UK time, and again at 4pm, and I hope to participate also in the Q&A sessions also at 11am and 7pm.

Also speaking in this conference are Hannah Bell, Shona Hunter and Joe Jackson, Jean Dickson, Craig Statham, Michelle Leonard, Michelle Brock and Chris Langley, and Emma Maxwell. As ever, it should be informative and a lot of fun!


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 22 August 2020

A visit to Portencross Castle in Ayrshire

I turn 50 in a few weeks, and so am now in a 'bucket list' mode! I have lived in North Ayrshire for 18 years, but despite constantly saying I want to see the inside of Portencross Castle, and despite many, many visits for walks beside it, I never somehow managed to accomplish that - until today!


Portencross Castle is situated close to the village of West Kilbride, and faces out towards Little Cumbrae on the Firth of Clyde - there is in fact a similar castle on the island (Little Cumbrae Castle), and between the two, the main approach to the Ayrshire north coast was guarded for centuries.


Portencross Castle was built in the 14th century (although it is believed there was an earlier fortification there from the 11th century), and is said to be where King Robert II, grandson of Robert The Bruce, signed some fifteen royal charters, with the castle also located at the caput of the historic barony of Ardneil.


Much of the building is now in ruin, but a great deal of restoration work by the Friends of Portencross Castle (FOPC) charitable trust has transformed the building, making it stable and safe for visitors. You can find out more about the history of the castle, and how to contribute to the work of the trust, at www.portencrosscastle.org.uk.


The castle has just re-opened to visitors, and the following is an announcement from the FOPC team about its current plans, if you fancy a visit:

Portencross Castle has re-opened
  • Our supporters and all our volunteers and staff are delighted to share the news that Portencross Castle has now reopened.
  • We will be open every day from 11.00am to 4.00pm until the end of August and then weekends until the end of September, including holiday Mondays when these occur. We will keep these times and dates under review in case government guidance imposes future restrictions due to the Covid-19 pandemic.
  • We have put in place Covid-secure measures including additional volunteers and stewards in attendance, social distancing indicators and hand santisers. We have masks available if you haven’t brought one and simply ask for a voluntary contribution to cover the cost so that we can keep a stock available for our visitors.
  • We have postponed our tenth anniversary of the opening the Castle as a public attraction and community educational resource until 2021. Watch this space.
  • We have kept in touch with those who booked weddings and other events in advance and will be dealing with each booking individually.
  • The FOPC Board is very grateful for the continuing support of our Guardians. If you would like to become a Castle Guardian by giving regular contributions, no matter how small, please download the Guardian leaflet from our website (http://www.portencrosscastle.org.uk/help.htm). You can also contact Ann on 01294 823799 or by email at fopc@portencrosscastle.org.uk.
  • Friends of Portencross Castle (FOPC) is an entirely voluntary enterprise and is dependent on raising funds to keep the visitor centre open and to pay for maintenance, repairs and development. We are grateful for the Covid-19 government funding that we received via North Ayrshire Council which will go some way to see us through till next year.
  • Once more, the FOPC Board would like to thank our supporters and benefactors including our stewards, volunteers, Guardians, visitors and all those who help at or attend our fund-raising events. Thank you.

It's a small building, but a truly wonderful place to visit, with a great view from the top and with great walks in the grounds on the shore also (somewhere where I have regularly had picnics in the past), so it was great to finally see the interior. It was especially nice also as it turned out that one of the team greeting us at the door was someone who I actually know, and who has been working there for a couple of seasons now, so a friendly face on hand as well!

Some further pics to set the scene...


And to show you how much I adore the place, this is a painting that my friend Martin Devlin did a couple of years ago, which I purchased from him, and which proudly adorns one of my sitting room walls:


Why not add Portencross to your list of places to visit also?!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Coming Soon - Researching Presbyterian Ancestors in Ireland

This looks a book worth having a copy of ! From the Ulster Historical Foundation (www.ancestryireland.com):

Coming Soon - Researching Presbyterian Ancestors in Ireland

Written by Dr William Roulston, author of the best-selling Researching Scots Irish Ancestors and Research Director of Ulster Historical Foundation, Researching Presbyterian Ancestors in Ireland is a new genealogical guide to help you find your Irish and Scots-Irish ancestors.

Millions of people around the world have Presbyterian ancestors from Ireland. The aim of this book is to help those with Irish Presbyterian roots find out more about their forebears. It considers the different strands of Presbyterianism in Ireland and explores the range of records generated by these religious denominations and where this material can be accessed by researchers. Much attention is focused on the documentation created by individual congregations, though consideration is also given to the records created by the higher courts of Presbyterianism and other bodies, as well as the personal papers of Presbyterian ministers.

Whether your ancestors were Covenanters, Seceders or Non-Subscribers, whether they were devout or merely nominal, whether they lived and died in Ireland or departed from these shores, this publication will assist you in understanding more about Presbyterians and Presbyterianism in Ireland.

This book will be available in mid to late September. Pre-order your copy now.

* To pre-order visit https://www.ancestryireland.com/presbyterian-ancestors/


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 21 August 2020

Pen and Sword Books anniversary sale

Pen and Sword (www.pen-and-sword.co.uk) have a 30th anniversary sale on just now, with many of their family history books and ebooks discounted by 30%.

Amongst those on offer are the following books from yours truly at just £10.49 (RRP is £14.99):

Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet
https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/16483

Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry through Church and State Records
https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Scottish-Ancestry-through-Church-and-State-Records-Paperback/p/16848

And the one that kicked it all off from yours truly, on UK wide resources, is at £9.09 (down from £12.99):
Tracing Your Family History on the Internet (Second Edition)
https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/6050

Although not part of the sale, my new book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet is about to be reprinted on August 30th, and it too is currently available at a pre-order price of £10.49 (RRP £14.99) - see https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Scottish-Family-History-on-the-Internet-Paperback/p/17717



Plenty of other titles are available also - and happy anniversary Pen and Sword!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

TheGenealogist releases Edinburgh and England/Wales Poll Books

From TheGenealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk):

TheGenealogist releases over 260,000 individuals in a new selection of Poll Book records

TheGenealogist has just released over 260,000 records into its ever growing Poll Book Record Collection. This useful resource for family historians can be used to find the address of an ancestor's residence from the period before and after the census records. The newly released Poll Books range from 1747 to 1930 and join records that also cover periods between the census years.

The release allows researchers to:
  • Find ancestors who had the vote
  • Discover where ancestors were registered to cast their ballot
  • See the nature of their qualification to vote, such as owning rateable property
  • Search Poll Books that range from 1747 to the 1930s

The records cover 36 different registers of people who were entitled to vote and covers constituencies situated in Bath, Devon, Hampshire, Hertford, Kent, Lincolnshire, London, Monmouthshire, Northumberland, Rutland, Scotland, Shropshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk and Surrey.

They join the millions of electoral resources on TheGenealogist which include Electoral registers, Voters Lists and Absentee Voters.

Read TheGenealogist’s article at:
https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2020/poll-books-and-electoral-rolls-used-to-locate-ancestors-address-1296/

COMMENT: From what I can see, the 'Scotland' collection is actually one book for Edinburgh! It's the Street List of Electors of the City of Edinburgh from 1854, available in the site's 'Polls and Electoral Rolls Searchable Books' database (rather than the similarly sounding 'Poll Books' database, which has no Scottish records). Certainly handy if you have ancestors in the capital in the mid-19th century!



(With thanks to Nick Thorne)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Banffshire records and Scottish burgessess & guild records join FindmyPast

The latest additions to FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk):

Scotland, Burgess & Guild Brethren Index

This fascinating collection of occupation records has grown with over 60,000 additions. They include exclusive portrait photos you won’t find elsewhere online. These amazing records date from the 1200s all the way up to the 1970s. In them, you can unlock details about Scotland's medieval burgesses - a minority of powerful merchants and craftsmen who controlled their burghs.

Scotland, Banffshire & Moray Life Events

Explore over 250,000 birth, baptism, marriage, death and burial records in three new collections from North East Scotland. As well as searching all three vital collections at once, you can delve into each one separately:
  • Scotland, Banffshire & Moray Births & Baptisms
  • Scotland, Banffshire & Moray Marriages
  • Scotland, Banffshire & Moray Deaths & Burials

Newspapers
Brand new to the site are:
  • Middleton Albion from 1893-1895
  • Newmarket Journal from 1897 and 1912
  • Patriot; or, Political, Moral, and Philosophical Repository Consisting of Original Pieces from 1792-1793
  • Bootle Times from 1887
  • Ashbourne Telegraph from 1926
  • Shetland News from 1885-1887, 1903 and 1919
  • Kirkcaldy Times from 1879, 1883, 1886 and 1892
  • Northman and Northern Counties Advertiser from 1881 and 1884
  • Helensburgh News from 1877, 1886 and 1892
  • Kelso Mail from 1869, 1881-1882 and 1885
  • Bolton Free Press from 1835 and 1842-1846

Meanwhile, we've added thousands of new pages to the following papers:
  • Daily Mirror from 1921
  • Huddersfield Daily Chronicle from 1897
  • Middlesex Chronicle from 1990
  • Luton Times and Advertiser from 1889
  • Kilmarnock Weekly Post and County of Ayr Reporter from 1864-1865
  • Leicester Chronicle from 1917

For further details and links visit https://www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/scottish-records


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 20 August 2020

Ancestry to sponsor virtual Back To Our Past event

Ireland's Back To Our Past team has announced that its virtual event in September is to be sponsored by Ancestry.

You can find out more about the event, from September 18th-20th, at https://backtoourpast.ie/.


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Donegal Grand Jury records online

Donegal County Archives have just dropped a nice announcement online - they have digitised the county's Grand Jury records and placed them online at http://www.donegalcoco.ie/culture/archives/donegalgrandjurydigitised/. They are mainly financial records, but name rich.

Here's the announcement from the Donegal County Archives Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/DonegalCountyArchives/posts/1743996555757783):

As we celebrate Heritage Week 2020 we are delighted to announce that the rest of microfilms of Donegal Grand Jury archives are now online to view along with a PDF of the Catalogue (list of items). This Collection is our oldest public collection and dates from 1753 to 1898. It is of great importance for local, family and academic history. The Grand Juries of Ireland were the predecessor bodies of modern local authorities and the records reveal much of the social, political and economic history of 18th and 19th century Ireland.


And details on the collection itself:

Donegal Grand Jury 1753 - 1899

Grand Juries were in existence since Norman times. Landowners made up the Grand Jury itself, selected by the Sheriff of the County. Grand Juries had no corporate existence, they were discharged by the Judge of Assize. Before the assizes, presentment sessions were called in each of the six baronies of Donegal, where proposals for work to be done were considered and submitted to the Grand Jury for ratification. Services provided and paid for by Grand Jury Cess, a rate payable by occupiers, included making, and repair of roads and bridges and construction of courthouses, levying for support of district hospitals, schools and prisons. Records of the Grand Jury of Donegal, including assizes, general information, treasurers' accounts; other financial records; resolutions; minutes of meetings; correspondence; and memoranda.

*Most items have been digitised, but the catalogue does indicate where digitisation has yet to take place.*

Covering dates: 1753 - 1899

Extent 50 items, incl files

The records are not indexed, so this is a go-in-and-do-it-the-auld-fashioned-way record set. Have fun!



(With thanks to Audrey Wyper via Facebook)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 19 August 2020

Is Google Maps archived?

I have just been reading a news report about the closure of a school in Dundee tonight, because six adults connected to the place have tested positive for Covid-19. Hopefully if this is a cluster forming it will be dealt with quickly and that all involved recover, but my interest in this story is the fact that if this is the start of another cluster, my son is due to return to university in Dundee in six weeks time, so an understandable concern.

Of course, the genie bug is never far away, and out of interest, I looked up a Google map of Dundee, to try to work out where the school is in relationship to my son's student digs.

In so doing, I noticed that many institutions are listed as 'Temporarily closed' (click on image to see in more detail):


For the last couple of days I have been working with historic OS maps from Northern Ireland to try to locate a particular property connected to my family history. I have had to use a few maps throughout the 19th century, and in looking at the Google map, the question suddenly hit me - does Google have a map archive? In a hundred years time, won't people find it useful to know from such a map what was open, and what was not, because of Covid-19, or any other number of historical queries utilising Google map based data? But also, in addition to maps, what about Google StreetView - is that archived, as places change across time?

Where else to start to find the answers but Google's own search engine! I soon found an article from The Atlantic in 2014 which noted that it has been possible to see historic images of an area as previously recorded by Google through its StreetView tool - see https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/04/google-maps-now-lets-you-time-travel-through-its-street-view-archives/361118/.

The facility to view historic StreetView images is acessible by clicking a small clock icon in the top left of the screen - see this example from Dundee, which shows that there are several versions of the same view dating back to 2008:


But what about maps? According to Google it is possible to see earlier images of an aerial view of an area through its free to download Google Earth Pro (https://www.google.com/intl/en_uk/earth/versions/#earth-pro). I downloaded it to test the feature, and was astonished to see a timeline showing the present day back to 1945 - although Google's images are clearly much more recent! Compare these two, the present day view above Greyfriars Burial Ground in Perth, and an image from 2006 (click to enlarge):



Handy as this will also undoubtedly turn out to be, this still does not show the mapping information, just the satellite imagery.

So my question remains - does Google actually archive the data on its Google Maps facility - in a hundred years, will I be able to note which buildings were closed because of Covid-19 from a historic Google map, or any other number of possible historical queries utilising similar data?!

If anyone knows the answer, I'd love to hear your thoughts in the comments section - thanks!

(All images courtesy of, and copyright to, Google)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Latest Broadsheet magazine from the Scottish Council on Archives

The latest edition of Broadsheet, the quarterly emagazine from the Scottish Council on Archives, is now freely available online.

Amongst the articles is a piece concerning a new Instagram account from the Ballast Trust depicting images from its Dan McDonald Collection. From the article:

Dan, a ship enthusiast born in Glasgow in 1899, was a keen amateur photographer who captured many stunning images of Scottish vessels, coastlines and scenery between 1920 and 1980. As a youngster, Dan saved his Saturday pennies to buy his first second-hand camera. He was also a frequent visitor to Glasgow’s dockside, where he chatted with the workers. After leaving school, Dan began working at the Glasgow Corporation Parks Department, where he remained for the rest of his working life. He had a keen interest in puffer vessels, eventually writing a book on the subject at the age of 76, The Clyde Puffer, which was published in 1977.

The full issue is available at at https://www.scottisharchives.org.uk/latest/broadsheet/.


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 18 August 2020

PRONI issues video on new Covid restrictions for reopening

The Public Record Office of Northern Ireland  (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni) has issued a short video on its YouTube channel about its forthcoming reopening on August 24th, as announced last week (see https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/08/proni-to-re-open-on-august-24th-with.html), with a walk through guide for those intending to visit showing what will and what will not be available.

The video is available at https://youtu.be/8Grxqny79ik and is reproduced below for convenience:




Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 17 August 2020

Highland Archives reopening update

From Highland Archive Service (https://www.highlifehighland.com/archives-service/), by email:

Highland Archive Service is pleased to welcome you back to our facilities. We are reopening in a phased way to help us to ensure that our centres provide a safe space for all, and that our services can be delivered safely. It also gives us the opportunity to review our approach with the flexibility to adjust our plans accordingly as required.

Summary of our updated procedures;

  • Opening hours will initially be 2 days per week, Tuesday and Thursdays. This will be reviewed regularly, and changes made accordingly.
  • Initially we will be open to provide access to original archive documents only. Access to ScotlandsPeople, PCs, microfiche and microfiche readers and reference books is not yet available.
  • You must make an appointment and pre-order all documents before visiting. Please do this a week in advance to ensure that the documents you require are available.
  • You must wear a face covering whilst in the building (exceptions accepted)
  • Physical distancing and hand sanitising stations will be in place throughout the building.
  • You will be asked to leave the building over lunchtime (12.30-2.00) to allow for enhanced cleaning of public areas.
  • Please note that, in line with Scottish Government guidance, we will retain your name and contact details for use in Test and Protect for 21 days.

The Highland Archive Centre will be re-opening on the 25th August. Visits will be by appointment only. For more information on booking and what to expect when you visit, see our latest update.

Skye and Lochalsh Archive Centre will be re-opening on the 1st September. Visits will be by appointment only. For more information on booking and what to expect when you visit, see our latest update.

Lochaber Archive Centre will be re-opening on the 8th September. Visits will be by appointment only. For more information on booking and what to expect when you visit, see our latest update.

Nucleus: The Nuclear and Caithness Archives currently remains closed to the public, although our staff will be on site from late August. For more information on what services we will be offering once back in the building please see our latest update.

Booking for all sites will be available one week before the opening date.

We look forward to welcoming you back into our buildings as well as continuing to connect with you digitally via:
https://www.facebook.com/highlandarchives/
https://www.facebook.com/skyearchives/
https://www.facebook.com/LochaberArchiveCentre/
https://www.facebook.com/nucleuscaithnessarchive/
https://www.facebook.com/ambaile/
https://twitter.com/HLHArchives
https://twitter.com/HighlandHistory

COMMENT: Note the comment on the ScotlandsPeople service access - I suspect this will only be up and running once the NRS in Edinburgh is up and running, and there is no news still on that front.


(With thanks to Highland Archives)

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

My new Pharos course: Progressing Your Irish Research Online

I have been tutoring two Scottish courses on Pharos Teaching and Tutoring Limited (www.pharostutors.com) for some ten years now. Both courses were previously written by Canadian based genealogist Sherry Irvine, but have been regularly updated by yours truly to keep on top of a whole host of developments in the online world since I first took over. They have both been an immense amount of fun, not least this year where the courses have kept me busy for the last twenty weeks during the lockdown, with two runs of both having recently ended - and I'm certainly not going anywhere on that front as yet, with the next Scottish Research Online course starting on August 31st! (See https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/08/my-next-scottish-research-online-course.html)

This is just a quick note, however, to advise of another course that I am writing and which I'll be starting next year, with my other hat on - and I am equally looking forward to getting stuck in on this one. So If you are seeking some tips for your Irish research, this might be of interest!

Progressing Your Irish Research Online (260)
Tutor: Chris Paton

There is a common belief that if you have Irish ancestors then you should give up hope of finding out about them, because 'nothing survived the fire', referring to the destruction of Ireland's Public Record Office during the Civil War in 1922. The overall aim of this course is to point out that this is a nonsense, and that the glass is half full and not empty. Whilst there are certainly challenges to be overcome, a great deal can still be accomplished with the many resources now rapidly finding their way online.

This course will describe the many state created records and church records that can be used to research your Irish ancestry. It will provide a context to understand why they were created, and by whom – and point out exactly where to find them online, and how to use them effectively.
Lesson Headings:

* Understanding Ireland – boundaries, key repositories and platforms
* The vital records of Church and State
* Documenting the people: Irish censuses and substitutes
* Valuation records and inheritance
* The Decade of Centenaries

Each lesson includes exercises and activities and a minimum of 1 one-hour chat per week. See How the Courses Work.

Relevant Countries: Ireland
Course Length: 5 weeks
Start Date: 05 Apr 2021
Cost: £49.99

I'll hopefully see you then - if not sooner!


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Self-Employment Income Support Scheme now open for second grant claims

The UK Government's Self-Employment Income Support Scheme is now open for grants for a second, and what it describes as 'final', claim from applicants adversely affected by the Coronavirus pandemic. If eligible to make a claim, and if your business has been adversely affected on or after 14 July 2020, you need to make your claim for this second grant on or before 19 October 2020.

To make a claim visit https://www.gov.uk/guidance/claim-a-grant-through-the-self-employment-income-support-scheme. You will need your UTR number, national insurance number, and your Government Gateway user ID and password.


UPDATE: Apparently this is being rolled out to applicants, so you may find upon applying that you are given another day this week to make your application. In response to a user query, HMRC has stated on Twitter that "The grant is available from 17/08/20. We have staggered dates for customers so everyone can claim the grant smoothly and efficiently."


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Using the Internet and PRONI for Northern Irish Research

As part of Australia's current Family History Month, I'll be giving a talk online this Wednesday 19th August at 8:00pm - 9:00pm AEST (that's 11am - 12noon UK time!) entitled Using the Internet and PRONI for Northern Irish Research. The talk is hosted by the Society of Australian Genealogists (www.sag.org.au) - here's the blurb!

Hosted by the Society of Australian Genealogists and presented by Chris Paton, author of Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (Second Edition), this webinar will explore how to access records for family history research available from Chris’s native Northern Ireland, whether they exist online, or at PRONI, Northern Ireland’s dedicated national archive in Belfast. Chris will explore the many resources available online, from vital records to land based research, what can be prepared for prior to a visit to the PRONI archive, and how to carry out research whilst there.
Please book for this event here – https://www.sag.org.au/event-3848200.

For further details on this and other SAG events, please visit https://familyhistorymonth.org.au/events/?pno=2


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 16 August 2020

My next Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st

My next Scottish Research Online course starts on August 31st - here's the blurb!


Scottish Research Online (102)
Tutor: Chris Paton

Scotland was one of the first countries to digitise its major family history records collections for accessibility online, and continues to this day to use such resources to promote a worldwide interest in family history for those with Caledonian connections.

This course, originally created by genealogist Sherry Irvine, and now taught and regularly updated by Scottish based genealogist Chris Paton, describes the major sites and record types that you will encounter in your research, and how to analyse the results. Most importantly it will inspire you to actively pursue your interest in Scottish genealogy and take it to the next level.

Lesson Headings:
  • Understanding Scotlands People, FindmyPast, Family Search, Ancestry, and FreeCen
  • Essential Maps and Gazetteers
  • Civil Registration and Census Research
  • Searching in Church of Scotland Registers
  • Scottish Wills and Inventories
  • Bonus lesson - Take It From Here

Note: it is recommended but not required that students in this course sign up for the basic search option, 30 units/seven days, at ScotlandsPeople (cost is £7.50 for 30 credits)

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat - See How the Courses Work.

STUDENTS SAID: "I particularly liked the fact that the course didn't just focus on the well-known BMD resources available, but on a much wider range of websites, including many which give extremely useful background information on the geography and history of the localities where our ancestors lived."

"a very knowledgeable Instructor"

Relevant Countries: Scotland

Course Length: 5 Weeks
Start Date: 31 August 2020
Cost: £49.99

For a wee video introduction to the course, see below or visit https://youtu.be/ssdYLlGtoHw



I'll hopefully see you there!

Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 14 August 2020

GRONI to re-open in Belfast with limited service on September 2nd

From the General Register Office Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/information-and-services/family-history-heritage-and-museums/research-family-history-general-register-office-ni-groni):

The General Register Office for Northern Ireland (GRONI) public search room is reopening with a limited service from Wednesday 2 September 2020.

Visitors must book their appointment in advance – appointments will be between 9.30 am and 12.30 pm or 1.00 pm and 4.00 pm.

Access will be limited to one person per booking.

Booking will be limited to a maximum of three visits per week per person or company.

No visitors will be allowed to enter the building without an appointment.

A number of changes to GRONI services will be in place to make sure of the health and safety of staff and the public.

All visitors must agree to follow the guidance contained in the public search room protocol document they will receive at the time of booking.

The public counter remains closed and you can apply for life event certificates by phone on: 0300 200 7890 or online ordering life event certificates.

Comment: don't forget that GRONI has an online service at https://geni.nidirect.gov.uk (and historic records can also be obtained at www.irishgenealogy.ie)


Chris

My next 5 week Scottish Research Online course starts August 31st - see https://www.pharostutors.com/details.php?coursenumber=102. My book Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is now out, also available are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.