Tuesday, 28 September 2021

Borders FHS to re-open Research Room by appointment

From Borders Family History Society on Twitter (@BordersFHS):

We are reopening our Research Room to welcome visitors on Tuesdays & Thursdays. Visit us at 52 Overhaugh Street, #Galashiels to build your #familyhistory. Book ahead by using the Archive Appointment Request option on the Contacts page on our website.

For further details on how to book please visit http://www.bordersfhs.org.uk

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 27 September 2021

Sharing Your Family History Online update

I've just learned from Pen and Sword that my last book, Sharing Your Family History Online, which was published at the start of this year, has already sold over 800 copies! A quick thank you to all who have bought the book - I've spoken on the topic this year to several societies, and it seems to have really resonated with many folk in a way that I wasn't quite expecting, so it is truly appreciated!

 

Last week, in one of my Pharos course lessons, I set an exercise for students which involved looking for the children of a couple of ancestors of mine, to make a point about dealing with how names are registered. One of the students (thank you David!) went a little further, and on FamilySearch identified that a photo of a brother of my great grandfather had been uploaded in July this year, to its online tree hosting facility. This is someone I have been trying to locate an image of for many years, because the London based brother, James, helped to look after my civilian family in Brussels during the First World War after the death of my civilian great grandfather David. 

 

By contacting the person who uploaded the image, I have since received several additional images, including an image of a clock that David is believed to have given James on a visit to Belgium, prior to his death in 1916. I had contacted a second cousin of my father about ten years ago to enquire about his line, and although he gave me some great stories, no images had been forthcoming - well it transpires that those images did in fact exist, as it was his son-in-law who uploaded them a few months ago!

We're used to going to archives and websites to look for documents about our family, but not all useful records are in archives, and we can actually use what we find to generate further leads for our research if we only put it back out there. So put some cousin bait on your line, and go fishing!

pen-and-sword.co.uk/Sharing-Your-F #genealogy #familyhistory - and once again, thank you!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Sunday, 26 September 2021

Registry of Deeds Indexing Project Ireland update

From the Registry of Deeds Index Project Ireland (https://irishdeedsindex.net) is fast approaching the half million entries mark:

Update of 26 September 2021 - 445,105 index records from 46,707 memorials of deeds.

Thanks to the continuing wonderful work of our volunteers we now have 445,105 index records from 46,707 memorials of deeds.

We continue to link more index entries to the associated images on FamilySearch and we now have almost two thirds linked. Moreover, all index entries for memorials in books 85 and below are linked. This means it is very quick to access the transcription book check the indexing and get more details form the memorail.

Of course all these index entries together with transcription of grantors and townland indexes are fully searchable for free at: https://irishdeedsindex.net/search/search.php

 

The Registry of Deeds, as well as the Land Registry and Land Commission records, are just some of those discussed in my newly released book, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records. A very useful record set indeed!

 

(With thanks to the project via its Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/RegistryofDeedsIndexProjectIreland)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 25 September 2021

British Newspaper Archive passes 45 million pages

The British Newspaper Archive (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) has passed 45 million pages of digitised content, with the county currently at 45,132.896 pages.

The following cntent has been added in the last 30 days:

Bury Free Press
1988, 1993-1994

New Milton Advertiser
1928-1931, 1989

Diss Express
1986, 1988-1990

Deal, Walmer & Sandwich Mercury
1989

Spalding Guardian
1993-1994

Fenland Citizen
1986, 1989

Saffron Walden Weekly News
1993-1995

Newark Advertiser
1910, 1912, 1987-1990

Newmarket Journal
1987, 1993

Faversham News
1895-1896, 1898, 1900-1906, 1908-1911, 1913-1919, 1936-1949, 1951-1980

Suffolk and Essex Free Press
1987, 1993

Grantham Journal
1986, 1993

Cornish Post and Mining News
1889-1895, 1898-1899, 1919-1944

Haverhill Echo
1888, 1986, 1993

Croydon Times
1861-1870, 1875-1878, 1880-1884, 1891-1899, 1901-1909, 1912-1918, 1920-1950, 1952-1961

Daily News (London)
1922-1938, 1940-1949, 1951-1954, 1957-1960

West Londoner and Select Advertiser for the Borough of Marylebone
1870-1872

North Londoner
1869-1875

Liverpool Chronicle 1767
1767-1768

Surrey & Middlesex Standard
1835-1840

Paddington Advertiser
1862-1866

North-West London Times
1861-1866

British Banner 1856
1856-1858

British Banner 1848
1848-1856

Liverpool Telegraph
1836-1838

Palladium 1825
1825-1826

Age
1852-1853

Fleming's British Farmers' Chronicle
1827

British Mercury or Wednesday Evening Post
1822

Metropolitan
1856-1857

Australian and New Zealand Gazette
1850-1882

Lynn News & County Press
1871-1873, 1875-1889, 1891-1892, 1913, 1915, 1918, 1924, 1938-1939, 1942

Sheerness Times Guardian
1878-1882

Islington Times
1857, 1859-1862, 1864-1865, 1871-1874

Borough of Greenwich Free Press
1855-1856, 1858-1865

South London Times and Lambeth Observer
1856-1865

Lynn Advertiser
1990

Eastern Counties' Times
1913

Brockley News, New Cross and Hatcham Review
1891

Southwark Mercury
1879-1881

Hammersmith Advertiser
1861-1866

Clerkenwell Dial and Finsbury Advertiser
1862, 1864-1865

Westminster Times
1863-1866

West London Times
1860-1867

Kingsland Times and General Advertiser
1860-1863

Chelsea & Pimlico Advertiser
1860-1866

Liverpool Daily Post
1858-1859, 1865, 1872

East London Advertiser
1862-1866

Morning Herald (London)
1808

Daily Director and Entr'acte
1859-1860

Birkenhead News
1897, 1899, 1912, 1914

Albion
1852-1853

Sheffield Independent
1929

Limerick Reporter
1849

Bright's Intelligencer and Arrival List
1860

Carlisle Patriot
1856

Daily Record
1917

Cambridge Daily News
1900

Dundalk Democrat, and People's Journal
1872

Stonehaven Journal
1847

Gloucestershire Echo
1924

Tipperary Free Press
1832

Galway Mercury, and Connaught Weekly Advertiser
1856

Cumberland Pacquet, and Ware's Whitehaven Advertiser
1857-1858, 1874

Peterhead Sentinel and General Advertiser for Buchan District
1898

Dublin Evening Post
1818

Barnoldswick & Earby Times
1954

St James's Gazette
1894

Faversham Gazette, and Whitstable, Sittingbourne, & Milton Journal
1855-1856

Clerkenwell News
1864

Dublin Medical Press
1868

Leicester Evening Mail
1913-1914, 1919, 1928, 1944

True Briton
1801-1804

North London Record
1858-1869

Agricultural Advertiser and Tenant-Farmers' Advocate
1846

World and Fashionable Sunday Chronicle
1818

Constitution
1831-1832

Richmond & Ripon Chronicle
1877

Sunday News
1823

Tower Hamlets Mail
1857-1858

Duckett's Dispatch
1818

Pen and Pencil
1855

New Globe
1823

Representative
1822-1823

National Protector
1847

Morning Gazette
1837

Vindicator (London)
1859

London Daily Guide and Stranger's Companion
1859-1860

Sunday Evening Globe
1836-1837

National
1835

Picture Times
1855-1856

The Palladium.
1829

West End News
1859-1860

London Chronicle and Country Record
1853-1854

Illustrated London Life
1843

Political Observer
1819-1820

Railway Bell and London Advertiser
1844-1846

Illustrated Weekly Times
1843

Watchman
1827-1828

Francis's Metropolitan News
1859

London Railway Newspaper
1845

Golden Times
1852

Union
1857-1862

London Journal and General Advertiser for Town and Country
1836-1837

Common Sense
1824-1826

Weekly Globe
1824-1825

Sunday Morning Herald
1824

Colonist and Commercial Weekly Advertiser
1824-1825

Thacker's Overland News for India and the Colonies
1858, 1864

Crown
1838-1839

Charles Knight's Town & Country Newspaper
1855-1856

Bell's Family Newspaper
1858

English Chronicle and Whitehall Evening Post
1802

Weekly Times (London)
1826-1829

Weymouth Telegram
1865

Cambria Daily Leader
1897, 1907, 1910-1911

Liverpool Evening Express
1906

Hull Daily News
1896, 1898-1899

Derby Daily Telegraph
1983

Nantwich Chronicle
1959

York Herald
1876

Birmingham Mail
1912

Kentish Gazette
1880

Liverpool Journal of Commerce
1882

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 24 September 2021

FindmyPast updates Scottish monumental inscriptions and English/Welsh electoral records

FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) has updated the Scottish memorial inscriptions collection and added further records to its English and Welsh electoral registers collection, now spanning 1910-1932. 

For further details and links visit www.findmypast.co.uk/blog/new/electoral-registers.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 23 September 2021

Dumfries and Galloway FHS book sales

From Dumfries and Galloway FHS (https://dgfhs.org.uk/):

Printed Book Sales

We are pleased to announce that in addition to our E-Books that are available in our Online Shop at https://dgfhs.org.uk/shop-online/ we are able to supply printed versions of our own books. These can also be ordered in our Online Shop and paid for by Credit/Debit Card or with a PayPal account

Alternatively you can complete our Mail Order Form and post it to us with your remittance. The Order Form and full Publication List are available in the Downloads section of our website at https://dgfhs.org.uk/downloads/ or email mail-order@dgfhs.org.uk and they will be emailed to you

What is meant by “Our Own Books”? Generally this refers to 1841 Census, Memorial Inscriptions, Old Parish Registers, Newsletters and Publications with extensive name indexes. These we can supply as E-Books or as Printed books.

Third Party books are generally those where we do not have permission to supply as E-Books and are only available as Printed versions. These are Through the Lens series, and Local History Publications except for Agricultural Glossary, Dalbeattie Granite and D&G Placenames. Currently to obtain printed versions of Third Party books you need to order via our mail order system. We will be working to make these available in our Online Shop and as they become available they will be added to the Online Shop as Printed only versions.

Thank you for your support and should you have any questions regarding our Online Shop please email onlineshop@dgfhs.org.uk

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

A video introduction to my new Irish land records book

Hi folks, 

Now that my new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records has been released - and with copies having arrived at my door! - I have recorded a short video introduction to explain what the purpose of the book is, and how I hope it might help. 

You can view it embedded below, or via YouTube at https://youtu.be/BdAM54kgGY0:

I hope it helps!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Tuesday, 21 September 2021

ScottishIndexes adds Crown Counsel Procedure Books index

Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes) has added 22.391 indexed entries from the Crown Counsel Procedure Books to its Scotland's Criminal Database. The indexes added cover the period from 28 November 1863 to 21 September 1871, with more to be added soon.

Emma Maxwell from Scottish Indexes has blogged an introduction to the new records at www.linkedin.com/pulse/new-records-added-scotlands-criminal-database-emma-maxwell/, including a short introductory video explaining how the indexes can be used to determine in which court a case may have been heard, which can be used to them locate the relevant records in the National Records of Scotland. 

The following is the result of a quick look-up to see if I could find the entry for James Crichton, who was tried in Perth in 1867 for the murder of my three times great grandmother Janet Rogers (nee Henderson), in a case found to be not-proven:

For coverage on what else in included in the Scotland's Criminal Database, visit www.scottishindexes.com/coveragescd.aspx.

(With thanks to ScottishIndexes via Twitter)

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

FamilySearch has digitised all of its microfilm records

This is a MASSIVE moment for FamilySearch (www.familysearch.org) - it has just completed the digitisation of ALL of its microfilm records. Here's the press release: 

September 21, 2021
FamilySearch Completes Digitization of Massive Microfilm Collection
Effort makes billions of historical genealogy records freely available online

FamilySearch completes initiative to digitize its 2.4 million rolls of microfilm for free online access.It is a milestone 83 years in the making. Today FamilySearch International announced the completion of a massive project to digitize its collection of millions of rolls of microfilm containing billions of family history records from around the world. The archive containing information on more than 11.5 billion individuals is now freely available to the public on FamilySearch.org.

"We hope that all those who contributed to this milestone in the last 80 years feel a sense of humble accomplishment today,” said Steve Rockwood, the CEO of FamilySearch International. “And we hope the millions of individuals who will discover, gather, and connect generation upon generation of their family members for years to come because of these efforts will have a deep sense of gratitude for the many unheralded contributors who made those discoveries possible."

“It's a game-changer for everybody in the world. So, instead of having to come to the library, people can start accessing these records from home,” said Becky Adamson, a research consultant at the FamilySearch Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Over 200 countries and principalities and more than 100 languages are represented in the digitized documents. Completion of the project makes it much easier for individuals to make more personal and family discoveries.

To explore FamilySearch’s free collections of indexed records and images, go to FamilySearch.org and search both “Records” and “Images”. The Images feature enables users to peruse digitized images from the microfilm collection and more. A free FamilySearch account will be required to access the service. 

For further information on the full project history, visit the original announcement at https://media.familysearch.org/familysearch-completes-digitization-of-massive-microfilm-collection/.

COMMENT: A massive congratulations to all at FamilySearch, for a monumental effort on this front!

FamilySearch has evolved massively over the last decade, transforming our ability to use its online resources. Whilst in the past we may have confined our searches to the available databases on the site, there are now many digital microfilms equally accessible through the online catalogue - amongst the records I regularly use, for example, are the Glasgow burial registers and the Irish Registry of Deeds records, which can only be accessed in an unindexed format via the catalogue.

However, despite the announcement, not all of the digitised material will be instantly available to us in our homes - for more on the reasons why, read the following article from the Legal Genealogist herself, Judy Russell, entitled 'Digitization Done', available at https://www.legalgenealogist.com/2021/09/21/digitization-done/.

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

RootsIreland adds further records for Co. Armagh

From RootsIreland (www.rootsireland.com) via email:

New Armagh Records Added

We are delighted to announce the addition of over 20,000 Armagh records of the following types:

    Kilmore Church of Ireland - additional baptisms
    Portadown Church of Ireland baptisms
    Kilmore Church of Ireland deaths
    New gravestone inscriptions (see online sources list for full details) https://rootsireland.ie/armagh/online-sources.php
    Various corrections and additions to existing Armagh record sets have also been made.

For an up to date list of sources for Armagh and to search these records, go to armagh.rootsireland.ie and login or subscribe as required.

Yours Sincerely
rootsireland.ie 

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Now on sale - Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records

So, I've had a little surprise this morning, in discovering that Pen and Sword has brought forward by ten days the publication of my next book, Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, which is now available for sale at https://www.pen-and-sword.co.uk/Tracing-Your-Irish-Ancestors-Through-Land-Records-Paperback/p/19283. Here's the back cover blurb!

The history of Ireland is one that was long dominated by the question of land ownership, with complex and often distressing tales over the centuries of dispossession and colonisation, religious tensions, absentee landlordism, subsistence farming, and considerably more to sadden the heart. Yet with the destruction of much of Ireland's historic record during the Irish Civil War, and with the discriminatory Penal Laws in place in earlier times, it is often within land records that we can find evidence of our ancestors' existence, in some cases the only evidence, where the relevant vital records for an area may never have been kept or may not have survived.

In Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records, genealogist and best-selling author Chris Paton explores how the surviving records can help with our ancestral research, but also tell the stories of the communities from within which our ancestors emerged. He explores the often controversial history of ownership of land across the island, the rights granted to those who held estates and the plights of the dispossessed, and identifies the various surviving records which can help to tease out the stories of many of Ireland's forgotten generations.


Along the way Chris Paton identifies the various ways to access the records, whether in Ireland's many archives, local and national, and increasingly through a variety of online platforms.


The following are the chapter headings:

Contents

Introduction
Timeline


1.    The Lie of the Land
        National Archives of Ireland
        Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
        The National Archives (UK)
        National Library of Ireland
        Local archives, libraries and museums
        Valuation Office
        Property Registration Authority
        Land and Property Services
        Irish Manuscripts Commission
        Irish Architectural Archive
        Other heritage services
        Place-names
        Gateway websites
        Commercial websites
        Family history and local studies societies
        Professional genealogists       
        Ye don’t ask, ye don’t get!

2.     A Brief History
        Gaels, Vikings and the Old English
        The Tudor Conquest
        The Plantations of Ulster
        A war in three kingdoms
        Rebellion, union and more rebellion
        The Land War and reform
        The partitioned island
        Terminology

3.    Boundaries and Administration
        The island of Ireland
        Provinces and counties
        Counties corporate and county boroughs
        Charter towns and boroughs
        Baronies and civil parishes
        Townlands
        Other historic land divisions
        Poor Law Unions and District Electoral Divisions
        Civil registration
        Converting administrative units
        Religious parishes, dioceses and ecclesiastical provinces
        Manors and demesnes
        Grand Juries
        Units of measurement

4.     Where Were They?
        Vital records
        The 1813 census
        Decennial census records (1821-1851)
        Census extracts for Old Age Pension applications
        Decennial census records (1861-1891)
        Decennial census records (1901-1911)
        Subsequent censuses
        Census reports
        1939 National Identity Register (Northern Ireland)
        Earlier censuses
        Early taxation
        Ecclesiastical censuses
        Street directories
        Electoral records
        Newspapers

5.    Valuation Surveys
        The Down Survey of Ireland
        Tithe records
        Townland Valuation
        Valuation field work
        Tenement Valuation (Griffith's Valuation)
        Valuation appeals
        Valuation Revision Books / Cancelled Land Books
       
6.    Tenancy and Ownership
        Estate records
        Freeholders
        Leases
        Rental records
        Estate maps
        The Quit Rent Office
        Manorial records
        Inheritance laws
        Probate records
        Finding Pre-1858 probate records
        Post-1857 probate records
        The Registry of Deeds
        Landowners in Ireland 1876
        Irish Land Commission
        The Land Registry
        Church land commissions

7.    A Sense of Place   
        Irish Historic Towns Atlas
        Ordnance Survey maps   
        Ordnance Survey Memoirs
        Gazetteers, journals and parish histories

8.    Further Reading

9.    Index


Just for good measure, Pen and Sword has also just posted the book's first review, which is short and sweet, but to the point!

Rating: 5 out of 5 stars

What a wonderful, well-researched resource for anyone wanting to trace your Irish roots! Chris Paton’s Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is a wealth of information all in one place! A book I will return to again and again to help me on my journey to find my Irish ancestors!

NetGalley, Jamie Lovett

I've enjoyed writing this, and it also marks a personal milestone for me, in that this is my twentieth publication over the last decade. I sincerely hope it helps with your Irish research. Due to the pandemic, this title was actually pulled forward, as I had enough material to hand to write this during the various lockdowns - the next title I will be working on, which was pushed back in my schedule, will also concentrate on Ireland, specifically Northern Ireland, and one of the greatest cities on Earth - but more on that in due course!

Enjoy!

Chris

My new book Tracing Your Irish Ancestors Through Land Records is now available to buy at https://bit.ly/IrishLandRecords. Also available - Sharing Your Family History Online, Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed), and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records - to purchase, please visit https://bit.ly/ChrisPatonPSbooks. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 20 September 2021

Visitors to PRONI no longer need to pre-order documents

As first mentioned on this blog ten days ago (http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2021/09/proni-will-shortly-remove-need-to-pre.html), the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (PRONI) has now removed the need to pre-order the documents you wish to view upon a visit to its site in Belfast's Titanic Quarter, although booking a slot for a visit is still a requirement.  

From PRONI's Facebook page (www.facebook.com/publicrecordofficeni):

Today we return to an on-demand (onsite) document ordering service, you are no longer required to submit record references when booking an appointment & you can order an unlimited number of records onsite during your visit. 

To book a research appointment this week, visit https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/o/public-record-office-of-northern-ireland-17939211570.

Further information on preparing for a visit to PRONI can be found at https://www.nidirect.gov.uk/information-and-services/public-record-office-northern-ireland-proni/your-visit.

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Remains of Scotland's earliest railway uncovered

An archaeological project has discovered the remains of Scotland's oldest railway. The Tranent Wagonway in East Lothian was constructed in 1722 for a coal mining operation, just fifteen years after the Act of Union with England, and some 23 years before the Forty Five Jacobite Rebellion. The project has unearthed timbers from the rail line which suggest several upgrades, dating from 1722-25, 1728-30, and 1743-44. 

For more on the story, visit the 1722 Waggonway Project at www.1722waggonway.co.uk/post/archaeological-digs-unearth-stunning-industrial-sites-in-east-lothian-linked-to-william-adam.


Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Saturday, 18 September 2021

Scottish Catholic Records talk by Mary McHugh

The Catholic Family History Society has announced that it will be hosting a talk entitled Scottish Catholic Records, to be given by Mary McHugh of the Scottish Catholic Heritage Collections Trust (www.blairsmuseum.com) on Saturday 25th September 2021, at 2pm.

For further details visit https://catholicfhs.wordpress.com/2021/09/16/scottish-catholic-records/.


Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

We're all Scottish now! Part Two

In September last year, AncestryDNA's latest ethnicity (admixture) update told me that I was now substantially more Scottish than Irish, with my Scottish DNA component now at 82% and my Irish at 16%; for my father, he was at 92% Scottish and just 8% Irish (see https://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2020/09/were-all-scottish-now.html).

Well Ancestry has revised the figures again. Apparently I am now 84% Scottish and 15% Irish, whilst my father's test shows him at 96% Scottish. 


My father sadly passed away in February this year, but I think he would have been bemused to know that he had become the spiritual reincarnation of Jock Tamson!

You can read more about this Ancestry update at https://www.ancestry.co.uk/dna/lp/ancestry-dna-ethnicity-estimate-update

I'm heading off now to "trade in my lederhosen for a kilt"...! 

(PS: Ancestry still can't spell 'whisky' when it refers to Scotland correctly - it's 'whiskey' when it is Irish!)

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Researching Agricultural Labourers in Scotland

The following is from an article I first produced for Discover my Past Scotland in 2011, with links updated, a few corrections, and somewhat expanded from the original: 

Agricultural Labourers

Some of the hardest occupations to research within a family tree are those of our agricultural labouring forebears, who causes so much depression for many of us upon their discovery within the censuses. Many will have worked as farmers, ploughmen and farm servants (referred to in some parts as 'hinds'), dairy maids, and female servants. Some worked collectively in ‘touns’, sharing land cultivated through the ‘runrig’ system, with each member of the settlement allocated strips of raised soil (known as ‘rigs’) for the growth of a particular crop. Others existed as pendiclers or cottars, inhabiting a small hut or building surrounded by an acre or two of cultivated soil from which they eked a living. They worked for the benefit of their feudal landowner, and if they made any kind of profit from their year’s labour after the payments of taxes and rents, they were indeed fortunate in the extreme.

Prior to the 18th century rent was paid in kind, with yield such as grain, butter and milk, and some financial payment. Tenants and their families also had to work for their landowner for several days in a year, known as ‘bondage days’, as well as through other means, such as the practice of ‘thirlage’ in feudal baronies. This much hated law required all tenants to grind their corn at the landowner’s mill, and to give a proportion of the grain known as a ‘multure’ (pronounced ‘mooter’) to the mill operator, often as much as a twelfth of the total amount. The law was abolished in 1779, leading to the decline of many mills not long after. Tenants were also required to pay local taxes such as cess, scat, and wattle, and to perform other duties such as the carrying of coals to a proprietor’s house from a great distance.

The Agricultural Revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries began to change the countryside and the agrarian lifestyle dramatically. Many Lowland estate holders enclosed vast numbers of smallholdings on their land into larger farms in an attempt to better manage and improve the soil through new agricultural techniques, many of them introduced from England. At the same time rents were increased dramatically. On other estates in the Highlands tenants were forcibly cleared to make way for more profitable sheep farming. As a result of all of these changes many families lost tenancies on the land on which they had previously worked. Some were repatriated to coastal settlements created by the landowners, others increasingly flocked to the cities to work in the factories, whilst many more were forced to emigrate.

Those who remained to work within the rural economy, and who were unable to secure or continue working a tack as a farmer, became part of a more mobile agricultural workforce, often moving regularly within a parish or from one parish to another to seek employment, whilst others became specialists in particular trades essential to the farming environment. At the bottom of the rung were the day labourers, who literally were hired by the day as and when required by farmers. Some lived within cottages which they built on waste ground, with the landowners’ permission, from which they would then hire themselves out. With the day’s chores complete, in their spare time they would plant potatoes and grain in the soil around them, feeding themselves and at the same time improve the quality of the land for the landlord. Others were more mobile, and were housed temporarily in bothies, small buildings which were often nothing more than basic rat infested huts with little furnishings but the simplest of amenities.

Particularly skilled agricultural workers such as ploughmen would be hired at fairs across the country for six months or a year at a time, usually reckoned from one of the term days of Martinmas (in November) or Whitsun (in May), a practice which all but died out towards the end of the 19th century. Once hired the ploughman and his family would take up their new position from the appropriate term day and be given accommodation close to the farm, where they would reside until the end of the contract, at which point they would seek employment at the next fair, and so on, though some remained with the same masters for several years on recurring contracts.

Trying to trace the movements of agricultural labourers can be difficult, but not always impossible. The censuses from 1841 to 1911 can of course help to locate them every ten years, but it is possible to build up a much more detailed picture of their lives as labourers. If you explore the records of baptism for their children, for example, you may well find that each child appears to have been born in a different parish or locality within the parish, which will give an idea of the geographic area around which they may have moved between contracts, as well as the frequency of their moves. Census and OPR records can be accessed via ScotlandsPeople (www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk) or in many local libraries and family history centres.


Contemporary newspapers (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) can provide details of the likely hiring fairs at which they were employed, which were often boisterous and fun filled occasions, and can at times even directly identify your ancestor, perhaps if he fell foul of the law or was the victor at a local ploughing competition. Church records can also help, detailing poor relief payments in the kirk session minutes for when times were hard, or perhaps instances when a labouring ancestor was hired for a specific task, which may be noted in the heritors’ records. Church of Scotland kirk session records have now all been digitised and can be accessed at the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk), as well as in many local archives in Glasgow, Hawick, Inverness and Orkney.

The two Statistical Accounts of Scotland at https://stataccscot.edina.ac.uk/static/statacc/dist/home can be extremely helpful to build up a sense of the labourer’s lot in life. Not only do they provide considerably detailed descriptions of the country’s parishes in the 1790s and 1830s-40s, they can also describe local farming and fair customs, as well as identify the key landowners within a parish, which can help you to try to trace any relevant estate records. Whilst rental records within estate papers will not often name most labourers (as they were not tenants), other sources such as estate wages books may record payments for work carried out, and name those so paid. A guide to estate papers held at the NRS is available at www.nrscotland.gov.uk/research/guides/estate-records, although many other collections will also be found in local archives across the country, and at the NLS. 

There are many published parish histories which can also help to build up the picture further, with many books and reports also written which specifically concern the conditions endured by labourers. A useful book from 1861, for example, as hosted on Google Books at http://tinyurl.com/5r3wdhd, is The Cottage, the Bothy and the Kitchen, Being an Inquiry into the Condition of Agricultural Labourers in Scotland by James Robb, which explores the typical conditions for day labourers, ploughmen, kitchen servants and more within East Lothian, Fifeshire, Forfarshire, Aberdeenshire and Ross-shire, noting the wages paid for each form of employment and more. Other useful titles include several published transactions of the Highland and Agricultural Society of Scotland and the Farmer’s Magazine, again with many examples found on Google.

Several survey books were also published in the late 18th century and early 19th century on a county by county basis for the Board of Agriculture entitled General View of the Agriculture of the County of... Each detailed the state of the agricultural industry in that area, including discussion on those working as labourers and farmers, the state of the land, and suggestions for improvements. Most are available to view on both Google Books and the Internet Archive; for example, General View of the County of Inverness, published in 1808, can be found at https://bit.ly/GeneralViewAgricultureInverness. A compilation of fourteen of the surveys from 1794, entitled General View of the Agriculture of the Counties of Scotland, Issues 1-14 is available at https://bit.ly/GeneralViewAgricultureScotland, and covers Fife, Galloway, the Hebrides, Central Highlands, East Lothian, Midlothian, Southern Districts of the County of Perth, Renfrew, Roxburgh, Selkirk and Tweedale (Peebles), along with an account for the Isle of Man.

Finally, to gain a sense of the rural labouring lifestyle endured by most of our ancestors, a visit to the National Museum of Rural Life (www.nms.ac.uk/national-museum-of-rural-life/) at East Kilbride in Lanarkshire is well worth a visit. Various local museums across the country will also have agricultural displays, such as Dalgarven Mill (www.dalgarvenmill.org.uk) in Ayrshire (as pictured in this blog post!).

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 16 September 2021

Update on Glasgow Registrars ScotlandsPeople service access

The following was issued from Glasgow Registrars at the end of last week, concerning the Genealogy Centre:

Due to the ongoing challenges of the Coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, the Genealogy Centre - run by Glasgow City Council's Registrars Services at the Mitchell Library (ScotlandsPeople Family History) will remain closed and bookings will not be taken until further notice.

Whilst we were hoping to confirm a re-opening date for the Family history Centre in the coming weeks, due to pressures elsewhere in the service, the decision has been taken to push back the date in order to allow our staff the necessary time to work through the extensive backlog of high priority statutory duties that we are dealing with at the moment.

We understand that this is frustrating for some of our citizens/service users,  however,  rest assured our team continue to work hard and we are hopeful that we will be in a position to re-open the centre soon.  All updates will be provided on our website (https://glasgow.gov.uk/index.aspx?articleid=17698) when any further information is available.

Thank you for your continued patience and support as we continue to face the challenges of the ongoing pandemic and the impact on our resources and services.​

This leaves Alloa and Glasgow the only centres at present not offering some form of access.

(Source: https://www.glasgowfamilyhistory.org.uk/DiscoverLearn/GettingStarted/Pages/Registrars.aspx)

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

ScotlandsPeople Centre to re-open to all customers again

From the National Records of Scotland (https://www.nrscotland.gov.uk/about-us/service-status), news that the ScotlandsPeople Centre is re-opening some provision to the general public again, after months of only permitting professional genealogists access:

Dundas Search Room

NRS is pleased to confirm we are now able to welcome all groups of customers back to the ScotlandsPeople Dundas Search room from Tuesday 21st September

Whilst we await the launch of our online seat booking system, we are opening up a restricted number of seats for all customer groups for the period Tuesday 21st September to Friday 1st October whilst work on the online seat booking system continues. Seats will be allocated on a strictly first come first served basis.
If you want to book a search room seat then please Contact us and select the category ‘Seat Booking ScotlandsPeople Centre’. If seats are available we will email you to let you know.

Please register for free at www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk prior to contacting us to ensure that you have an account set up.

Note that the Dundas Search Room is smaller than the main Reid Room, where most folk normally use the ScotlandsPeople system (which was commandeered by the NRS as a consequence of the pandemic for use instead of its Historical Search Room), hence why there are a limited number of seats available. 

This leaves the ScotlandsPeople service provision at Alloa, Clackmannanshire, and in Glasgow, as the only services still unavailable in Scotland to the public, although Highland Life in Inverness is currently only offering limited access on a trial basis.

(With thanks to Emma Maxwell and Ken Nisbet) 

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 15 September 2021

An Introduction to NRS Archives talk by Tessa Spencer

Scottish Indexes (www.scottishindexes.com) has placed a talk online that was recently given at one of its conferences, entitled An Introduction to NRS Archives, by archivist Tessa Spencer. You can find the talk below, or at https://youtu.be/e0fY74K87Qo:


It's a great overview of the records held at the National Records of Scotland (www.nrscotland.gov.uk) - and it's especially nice to see the Inland Revenue Field Books get a mention, a great resource for house history research!

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Monday, 13 September 2021

Digital walkthrough of Perth from the year 1440

This has been doing the rounds this morning on social media - a digital reconstruction of the city of Perth, Scotland, from the year 1440, as featured in History Scotland magazine, and created by a partnership between Perth and Kinross Heritage Trust, Smart History Ltd and the Open Virtual Worlds group at the University of St Andrews. 

 

(Also available via https://vimeo.com/455716281)

This is a little bit before my Paton lot reached the city (in the 1780s!). You can read more about the project at https://www.historyscotland.com/history/explore-15th-century-perth/, and on medieval Perth at https://medievalperth.org.

(Thanks to Janet Few, Pharos Teaching and Tutoring Ltd, and others!)

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Who Do You Think You Are? Series 18 to air in October

Series 18 of Who Do You Think You Are? has been announced as commencing transmission on BBC1 at some stage next month, October 2021. The following candidates will have aspects of their family histories explored:

  • Judi Dench
  • Josh Widdicombe 
  • Alex Scott
  • Joe Lycett
  • Pixie Lott
  • Joe Sugg
  • Ed Balls

I've heard of three of them, but I'm sure their ancestors will be the real stars!

For more information, read the annoucnement at the Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine site at https://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/tutorials/tv-series/dame-judi-dench-who-do-you-think-you-are-2021/.

Incidentally, you may be interested to know that several early episodes of the series, including the very first edition with Bill Oddie, exist in podcast format at https://www.walltowall.co.uk/program/who-do-you-think-you-are-podcast_2165.aspx.

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Friday, 10 September 2021

PRONI will shortly remove need to pre-book documents for a visit

I attended the latest stakeholder forum this morning for the Public Records Office of Northern Ireland (www.nidirect.gov.uk/proni), where I heard some very welcome news for readers who use the institution.

Having received new advice on best archival practice in the pandemic, PRONI is shortly intending to remove the need to pre-order the limited number of documents that you can currently look at, as it will no longer be required that documents be quarantined prior to a visit and after - this basically means that you will be able to order up any document whilst on site.

Just to add to the good news, the Public Search Room will also be re-opened, and access restored to the self-service microfilm area, with microfilm printer availability also. In addition, two of the four GRONI access terminals are to be restored, providing access to the https://geni.nidirect.gov.uk service for civil registration BMD events (including within the online closure periods), and access to two terminals restored for access to off-site resources (e.g. FindmyPast). Each attendee will be allocated a dedicated microfilm reader and a computer offering access to the on-site CALM catalogue, theirs for the duration of a visit.

A timeline has yet to be clarified, but it is intended that this will be implemented fairly imminent - not next week, but potentially by the back end of September, as there are some technical challenges to sort with removal of online ordering and other issues. Slots for research will still need to be booked in advance, and other Covid mitigations put in place (for example, a one way system for travel between the public search room and the historic documents room). PRONI intends to announce the specifics on these updates over the next week or two. 

Please note - these measures are not yet in place, so please await the formal announcement!

Some other news from PRONI:

The on-site CALM catalogue (basically the version of the catalogue you see at the centre as opposed to that available online) has been in use for 14 years now. There has been an extension of the contract until next year, but a new catalogue system will then be implemented, the contract having gone to Axiell Collections. For the humble user, there will be a fresher feel to the system, but the actual functionality will be essentially the same, with no major changes foreseen.

On the cataloguing front, the following are amongst the materials being worked on recently (the references may not be accessible on the online catalogue yet):

  • D4794 Reid family papers from 1806, including material from the Rev. James Seaton Reid
  • D4780 Research papers from the Lost Lives book on Troubles victims

I was also delighted to hear that papers from the Ultach Trust (Ulster Languages Traditions and Culture) are also being catalogued for the first time. As a student in the 1990s the agency was incredibly helpful with regards to a student documentary I made on the use of the Irish language in Ulster. This will be the first collection to be catalogued bilingually at PRONI in both English and Irish.

In terms of new accessions, there's a fair bit happening of interest to genies:

  • Church of Ireland records from Inch in Co. Down – vestry records from 1757 onwards.
  • St. Cedma's Church, Larne - baptisms from 1806, marriage records from 1817, and burials from 1826. Also the vestry records from 1763.
  • Reformed Presbyterian Church - overseas missionary work registers from 1907, including work in Syria and other places.

Another big acquisition is a major update to Ulster Unionist Council material held at the archive, with fifty more boxes being deposited at PRONI, including seven boxes of material on the Ulster Vanguard movement.

There are also some further estate papers, and other materials to be worked on over the next few months, including potential acquisitions concerning Belfast's Jewish history, thanks to a partnership with the Belfast Jewish Community.

Dave Huddleston gave us an update on CAIN (the Conflict Archive on the Internet), which PRONI contributes to. There have been 24 million visits to the site now, with 87 million page views, and with links to 30 associated sites. Recent records added include 440 declassified documents from 1993-94, which discuss the IRA ceasefire. It was pointed out that the Clinton Library in the USA has further materials from the era, as indeed has the National Archives of Ireland, which can be cross-referenced to add further context.

On other fronts, the Mellon Centre for Migration Studies (https://mellonmigrationcentre.com) near Omagh has now re-opened once again, and the North of Ireland FHS (www.nifhs.org) has a new book coming out shortly on Belfast resources.

COMMENT: For all of us exiles on this side of the water, compare the service from PRONI with the service that we have had from the NRS in Edinburgh over the last year. PRONI deserves immense praise for the incredible lengths it has gone to serve its user base - it has been simply outstanding.

(With thanks to all at PRONI and others at the meeting)

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Thursday, 9 September 2021

Thanks to Caithness FHS and Queensland FHS

Thanks to Caithness Family History Society (https://caithnessfhs.org.uk) last night for its warm welcome when I gave a talk via Zoom on the subject of Genealogy Without Borders. It was the society's first hosted talk event on Zoom, so it was an honour to be the one to give the talk, and we had a great session after with some Q&As. 

The society has a new book out, Stroma Monumental Inscriptions (Member price £5.00 / Public price £6.00), which I promised to plug! Details on this and other titles are available at https://caithnessfhs.org.uk/publications.php

 

A big thanks also to Queensland FHS (www.qfhs.org.au) for its warm welcome on Tueday last week, when I gave a talk on Scotish Kirk Session Records, with an equally warm reception. I've heard some great feedback, so glad it helped those who found it useful!

Next week I'll be even busier on the talks front, with the following sessions planned:

Tuesday 14 SEP 2021
Society for One Place Studies
Scottish family history resources pre-1800
https://www.one-place-studies.org/

Thursday 16 SEP 2021
Dunbartonshire FHS
There's Been a Murder - the Mount Stewart Murder of 1866
https://www.scottishmemories.co.uk

Saturday 18 SEP 2021
Anglo-Scots branch, Manchester and Lancashire FHS
Instantly Buckled for Life - Scottish Marriage Records
www.mlfhs.uk/anglo-scots

I hope to maybe see you there!

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

It's good to keep up family traditions! Part 2

Last month (http://scottishgenes.blogspot.com/2021/08/its-good-to-keep-up-family-traditions.html) I posted an old but still very funny IRN BRU advert from YouTube, showing a father who, when asking his wife and mother-in-law what they should name their new baby, has to gulp down copious amounts of IRN BRU to deal with the suggestion of "Fanny", a name once popular in Scotland, but avoided by many today! 

(Also available at https://youtu.be/IcKlVojfMD4)

I've just had an email from reader Chris Schuetz pointing out an Australian run on the same gag, concerning a once popular name avoided by many today - Calum Murray. Enjoy...!


(Also available at https://youtu.be/I0oUVTJ5HzI)

Are there any other examples?! 

(With thanks to Chris - and apologies to any Calum Murrays out there!)

Chris

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.

Wednesday, 8 September 2021

Old Scottish updates Registers of Deeds indexes

Old Scottish Genealogy and Family History (www.oldscottish.com) has announced an update to its Register of Deeds records:

We've just updated our index to Registers of Deeds - now over 25,000 entries from over 170 registers.

The records are drawn from the following Sheriff and Commissary Courts:

  • Cromarty Sheriff Court (1806-1931, NRS references SC24/15/1-2)
  • Cupar Sheriff Court (1809-1900, NRS references SC20/34/1-54)
  • Dingwall Sheriff Court (1794-1889, NRS references SC25/59/1-4)
  • Dunblane Sheriff Court (1809-1902, NRS references SC44/59/5-10)
  • Dunoon Sheriff Court (1809-1888, NRS references SC51/50/3-8)
  • Haddington Sheriff Court (1809-1895, NRS references SC40/58/1-16)
  • Linlithgow Sheriff Court (1809-1899, NRS references SC41/68/22-28)
  • Moray Commissary Court (1785-1823, NRS references CC16/9/7-12)
  • Paisley Sheriff Court (1809-1899, NRS references SC58/59/1-30)
  • Stirling Sheriff Court (1809-1901, NRS references SC67/49/1-42)
  • Tain Sheriff Court (1812-1884, NRS reference SC34/19/2/1)

You can access the indexes at https://www.oldscottish.com/register-deeds.html 

(With thanks to Fergus Smith @oldscotbooks)

Chris 

Just out, Sharing Your Family History Online is on sale at https://bit.ly/SharingFamHist. Tracing Your Scottish Family History on the Internet, at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scottish2 is also out, as are Tracing Your Irish Family History on the Internet (2nd ed) at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Irish1 and Tracing Your Scottish Ancestry Through Church and State Records at http://bit.ly/ChrisPaton-Scotland1. Further news published daily on The Scottish GENES Facebook page, and on Twitter @genesblog.